Search found 36 matches

by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:46 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Fe------ferrate? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 232

Re: Fe------ferrate? [ENDORSED]

All anionic complexes have the transition metal ending in "ate" The complex [Fe(CN)6] 4- has an anionic charge of 4- making the Fe--- Ferrate. Im not absolutely sure about cyano, but I think it is because it is a charge of -1, making it also an anion. And for neutral atoms it would be cyan...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:37 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory Applied To Transition Metals
Topic: prefix
Replies: 3
Views: 186

Re: prefix

Tip : do not consider prefixes when naming the coordination compound alphabetically, but still include the prefixes in the name.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:28 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Ionic Character
Replies: 7
Views: 287

Re: Ionic Character

Oxygen is more electronegative than Cl because electronegativity decreases down the columns and increases across. Thus, O is more electronegative than P
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:20 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Lewis Acids and Bases
Replies: 10
Views: 299

Re: Lewis Acids and Bases

Lewis Acid : electron pair acceptor
Lewis : electron pair donor

Say if you draw the lewis structure NH3 + BF3 , you will notice that the lone pair on N from NH3 will be accepted by BF3, making NH3 the base and BF3 the acid
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:15 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: What are polydentate ligands ?
Replies: 4
Views: 119

What are polydentate ligands ?

Can someone explain how you can tell if a ligand is a monodentate , bidentate, triedentate ligand etc... ?
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Geometry vs molecular shape
Replies: 5
Views: 83

Re: Geometry vs molecular shape

Molecular Geometry : bonds

Electronic Geometry/ arrangement : Bonds and lone pairs
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 11:01 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: How to tell?
Replies: 2
Views: 90

Re: How to tell?

Typically acids have a hydrogen atom. For instance HCl and HPO+
Also acids can typically gain a hydrogen atom for solutions involving water for instance NH3 + H2O (double arrows in both directions) NH4^+ OH^-
H2O is the acid and NH4^+ is the conjugate acid
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 10:54 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: How to determine which bond is more covalent?
Replies: 1
Views: 69

Re: How to determine which bond is more covalent?

F-Cl would be more covalent because they share an equal amount of valence electrons thus having it be nonpolar while P-O would be less strong as a covalent bond because they share a different amount of valence electrons. Some things to keep in mind is that ionic bonds are atoms are metal + nonmetal ...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 10:37 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Importance of Sigma/Pi Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 83

Re: Importance of Sigma/Pi Bonds

They help give us the shape of the molecule by giving a 3D interpretation.
Pi bonds are perpendicular to the plane of hybrid orbitals which are sigma bonds.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 28, 2019 10:33 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted and Lewis Acids and Bases
Replies: 2
Views: 86

Re: Bronsted and Lewis Acids and Bases

Bronsted Acids - Proton donor
Bronsted Bases - proton acceptor
Lewis Acids- electron pair acceptor
Lewis Bases - electron pair donor
Arrhenius Acids - forms H+ / H3O+ ions in (aq) solution
Arrhenius Bases - forms OH- ions in (aq) solution
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:57 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Central Atom
Replies: 3
Views: 129

Re: Central Atom

The central atom is restricted to the element that has the lowest ionization energy. Fluorine (as far as I know) has the highest ionization energy, so whatever element that has a higher ionization energy than Fluorine would allow Fluorine to be the central atom.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:51 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: pi bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 195

Re: pi bonds

I might not be able to answer this question correctly, but I think because pi bonds do not allow bound atoms to rotate, so I think the electron densities would be pointed in one direction instead of both in and out.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:44 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Inter and Intra
Replies: 8
Views: 238

Re: Inter and Intra

Intra means within, this is one dipole
Intermolecular is between two dipoles that make a bond and can be easily broken.

ClH----ClH

ClH is the intramolecular force

The dashed lines are the intermolecular force

Another example is

H2O-----H2O
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:41 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizing Power [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 288

Re: Polarizing Power [ENDORSED]

High Polarizing Power: Smaller cations that have higher positive charges, cations with the same radius, the higher the charge is
Li+ is the highest of polarizing power among alkali metal ions
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:34 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Which do you prioritize first
Replies: 10
Views: 271

Re: Which do you prioritize first

Valence electrons because you need to know the number of valence electrons for a certain structure in order to make bonds and lone pairs before you start adding formal charges.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 20, 2019 6:33 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 7
Views: 262

Re: Radicals

Radicals are unequal pairs of electrons that can be found when you are given a compound. For instance, the compound OF has 13 valence electrons. This is an unequal pair of electrons because 13 does not make an equal pair of electrons since it is an odd number, one electron will be left by itself.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 2:09 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power
Replies: 1
Views: 96

Re: Polarizability vs. Polarizing Power

Polarizability -
- Generally for anions, are electrons that are further away from the nucleus
- more energy shells = more polarizability
Polarizing power- Generally for cations, are less electrons closer to the nucleus
- less electron shells = more polarizing power
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:58 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Intermolecular vs. Intramolecular forces
Replies: 5
Views: 189

Re: Intermolecular vs. Intramolecular forces

Intermolecular forces : Forces that hold molecules in a substance

Intramolecular forces: Forces that hold atoms in a molecule

Intramolecular forces are stronger because they contain covalent, ionic, and metal bonds.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:51 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals beyond f-
Replies: 4
Views: 280

Re: Orbitals beyond f-

I think you are absolutely true because electrons can jump to higher energy levels when excited which means they can also jump to higher energy orbitals. On the contrary, if you want an electron to remain in the g orbital or beyond, you probably need a significant amount of energy and the ability to...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:29 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Valence electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 136

Re: Valence electrons

Elements in the d block are transition metals, so they normally express valence electron from the s orbital. For example, Fe has 2 valence electrons because the electron configuration is 1s^2 2s^2 2p6 3s2 3p^6 4s^2 3d^5. Notice that both ns^2 have 2 electrons so we have 2 valence electrons. Another ...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:15 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Reasoning for Al amphoteric
Replies: 3
Views: 196

Re: Reasoning for Al amphoteric

According to what I found from google, depending on what Al reacts with, makes the reaction as a base or acid. For instance when Al(OH)3 s + 3HCl aq ==> AlCl3 aq + 3H2O reacts as a base in acidic conditions. This is possible as we know that anything with -OH is a base. However, I think it may be bec...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:07 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals beyond f-
Replies: 4
Views: 280

Re: Orbitals beyond f-

I think the reason for this is because there are more elements beyond what the periodic table provides, but those elements remain unknown. I read somewhere that there are elements beyond 121 that make up the g orbital. However, maybe it is possible to compute them based on the patterns given from th...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jul 13, 2019 12:56 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ground State
Replies: 13
Views: 298

Re: Ground State

So Copper can't have a d-orbital 3d^9 because any atom written as 3d^9 or 3d^4 has to have its electrons evened out in the d orbital subshell, so it becomes [Ar] 3d^10. If you set up a d orbital sub shell for 3d^10 , you will be able to fill 2 electrons for each of the 5 orbitals to make 10 electron...
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:49 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: De Broglie's equation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 7
Views: 308

Re: De Broglie's equation [ENDORSED]

De Broglie's equation proves that all matter has wavelike properties. Thus, it can be used to to find the wavelength of a proton or an electron by simply using the mass of a proton or electron and velocity.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:45 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light variables
Replies: 3
Views: 173

Re: Light variables

Aside from the speed of light, if you were given the variables from the de Broglie's equation, you can solve for the wavelength and therefore use this wavelength in the equation c = wavelength x frequency.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:40 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of Light
Replies: 21
Views: 477

Re: Speed of Light

The speed of light is constant, it helps maintain the equation c= wavelength x frequency by allowing wavelength and frequency to be inversely related.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:37 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photo electric effect
Replies: 7
Views: 212

Re: Photo electric effect

The vacuum prevents air molecules from electrons emitted from being mixed.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sun Jul 07, 2019 5:35 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: How do we know that an electron can't be between an energy level?
Replies: 3
Views: 150

How do we know that an electron can't be between an energy level?

Why do energy levels have to be integers without decimals. For instance, the principle quantum number of an electron moves from energy level n=1 to n=2 when it absorbs light. Why couldn't this electron have moved to n=1.5? How do we know energy levels exist?
by Radha Patel 1A
Mon Jul 01, 2019 6:36 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Do we need to know how to set up a net ionic equation for test 1? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 122

Do we need to know how to set up a net ionic equation for test 1? [ENDORSED]

Question M9 on the section for Limiting Reactants asks to write the net ionic equation for the reaction?
How do we determine what is "net"? Will be asked on Test 1 to set up a net ionic equation?
by Radha Patel 1A
Mon Jul 01, 2019 6:30 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: M.9 part a
Replies: 3
Views: 179

Re: M.9 part a

So do we still include NaOH in this equation, what do you mean by net molecule?

Also, how exactly do we approach this problem to set up a balanced equation?
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Test Studying Strategies
Replies: 6
Views: 200

Re: Test Studying Strategies

I normally do these: review homework problems, ask questions about things I don't understand, and try my best to comprehensively understand the word problems we are given.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:32 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: How to distinguish limiting or excess reactant.
Replies: 4
Views: 178

Re: How to distinguish limiting or excess reactant.

The limiting reactant is only when there is little of a certain molecule in the reactant that limits how much there should be in the end product. In this case both sides of the equation are equivalent.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:25 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Numbers to memorize
Replies: 24
Views: 699

Re: Numbers to memorize

There will be chemical formulas and equations given on the exam, including a periodic table.
by Radha Patel 1A
Sat Jun 29, 2019 9:21 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: What does dilution mean in a chemistry problem?
Replies: 3
Views: 139

What does dilution mean in a chemistry problem?

Does dilution mean you are adding or subtracting the amount of liters in a solution ?
by Radha Patel 1A
Thu Jun 27, 2019 10:12 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Stoichiometric reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 271

Stoichiometric reactions

Could someone explain how you are supposed to understand stoichiometric reactions. For instance, in the chemical equation N2(g) +3H2(g) -> 2NH3 (g), how and why is 1 mol N2 chemically equivalent to 3 mol H2 and 2 mol NH3?
by Radha Patel 1A
Wed Jun 26, 2019 10:06 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Moles and Molarity HW Problem E.29b
Replies: 2
Views: 121

Moles and Molarity HW Problem E.29b

The homework question for E29 b says "How many moles of Cl- ions are present in the sample?" The sample is 8.61g of CuCl2 x 4H20 , the moles of this sample is 0.0417. The answer to this problem is .0834 mol Cl- Why do we have to multiply 0.0417 mols twice? Doesn't 0.0417 represent the enti...

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