Search found 19 matches

by Chris Charton 1F
Wed Jul 31, 2019 12:37 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: CO3(2-) Carbanato
Replies: 2
Views: 178

Re: CO3(2-) Carbanato

Hmm, I saw it stated as such when looking it up earlier. I see in our textbook it's only referred to as monodentate so I'm just going to go with that.
by Chris Charton 1F
Wed Jul 31, 2019 12:08 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: CO3(2-) Carbanato
Replies: 2
Views: 178

CO3(2-) Carbanato

Because CO3(2-) can either be monodentate or bidentate do we use bi- tri- etc as the prefix or bis- tris-?
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 11:58 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Angles
Replies: 2
Views: 140

Re: Angles

In the seesaw shape, the lone pair does not effect the axial angles. So the angles are 90, <120, and 180.
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 11:37 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Delocalization of charge and stability
Replies: 2
Views: 346

Re: Delocalization of charge and stability

One thing it can refer to is the electronegativity of the central atom of the conjugate base. For example; ClO4- vs H2PO4- Cl is more electronegative than P, so it handles the negative charge more effectively. HClO4 is thus a stronger acid than H3PO4.
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 11:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: how to draw lewis structure
Replies: 9
Views: 289

Re: how to draw lewis structure

With a radical you assign the lone electron to the atom with the lowest Electronegativity. For example in HOCO (17 e) the lone electron would be put on C.

I checked out ClO2, it involves something called a triple electron bond, which is beyond this class.
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 11:09 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar v. Nonpolar
Replies: 11
Views: 265

Re: Polar v. Nonpolar

Yes, the vectors would cancel out with that shape, but more importantly C-H is not a polar covalent bond, they both have similar Electronegativities. CH3+ would also be a symmetrical shape with canceling vectors, but again, the bonds are not polar.
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 10:57 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Water as an Acid/Base
Replies: 10
Views: 315

Re: Water as an Acid/Base

You can recognize it because it will have a H+ to give, and be able to receive an H+.

An example would be HPO4 (2-)
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 10:54 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Strength of Acids vs. Number of Oxygens
Replies: 6
Views: 631

Re: Strength of Acids vs. Number of Oxygens

Yes, if the acid is polyprotic, it will be strongest when it has the most H. For example, H3PO4 is a stronger acid than H2PO4-

This is because it is easier to remove the first H.
by Chris Charton 1F
Tue Jul 30, 2019 10:47 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: shape
Replies: 2
Views: 182

Re: shape

Chem_Mod wrote:Because there are 6 ligands, 3 from the Na and 3 from the oxalate, it will have an octahedral shape.


I thought oxalate was bidentate, and thus 3 of them would provide the 6 areas.
by Chris Charton 1F
Mon Jul 29, 2019 11:31 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: What are polydentate ligands ?
Replies: 4
Views: 219

Re: What are polydentate ligands ?

Hexadentate is 6 binding sites.
by Chris Charton 1F
Mon Jul 29, 2019 11:28 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic vs covalent
Replies: 8
Views: 219

Re: Ionic vs covalent

If the difference is between 1.5 and 2 does the bond exhibit qualities of both ionic and covalent bonds?
by Chris Charton 1F
Mon Jul 29, 2019 12:38 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxidation states
Replies: 5
Views: 215

Re: Oxidation states

I think they might be referring to finding the oxidation state of a metal in a coordination compound.
by Chris Charton 1F
Mon Jul 29, 2019 12:30 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: charges and roman numerals
Replies: 5
Views: 393

Re: charges and roman numerals

The Roman Numeral indicates the Oxidation State.
by Chris Charton 1F
Mon Jul 29, 2019 12:25 am
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Why can h20 only donate 1 lone pair?
Replies: 5
Views: 399

Re: Why can h20 only donate 1 lone pair?

In my understanding with coordinate covalent bonding the element can only donate one pair to another element, no matter how many lone pairs it may have.
by Chris Charton 1F
Fri Jul 05, 2019 2:56 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: kinetic energy of electron
Replies: 8
Views: 358

Re: kinetic energy of electron

How can something be released with a KE of 0? That would mean it has no velocity, so its position would not change.
by Chris Charton 1F
Thu Jun 27, 2019 10:12 am
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Use of Kelvin
Replies: 6
Views: 291

Re: Use of Kelvin

Temperature is the measure of the average kinetic energy of the particles of a substance. At absolute zero the kinetic energy of the particles is zero, ie they stop moving. Because you can't have negative kinetic energy, you can't go past zero.
by Chris Charton 1F
Thu Jun 27, 2019 10:06 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Moles and Molarity HW Problem E.29b
Replies: 2
Views: 195

Re: Moles and Molarity HW Problem E.29b

In each molecule of CuCl2 there will be two ions of Cl, hence you need to double the amount of moles found of CuCl2 to find the number of moles of Cl- ions.
by Chris Charton 1F
Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:59 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: the mole
Replies: 4
Views: 257

Re: the mole

Grams per cubic centimeter is also commonly used.

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