Search found 101 matches

by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Mar 14, 2020 5:21 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: graphs and order
Replies: 2
Views: 67

Re: graphs and order

For 1st order reaction: ln[A] vs time is linear
For 2nd order reaction: 1/[A] vs time is linear
For 0th order reaction: [A] vs time is linear
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Mar 14, 2020 5:20 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: molecularity
Replies: 3
Views: 131

Re: molecularity

Order of a reaction is the power dependence of the rate on the concentration of the reactants. Molecularity refers to the number of reactants present (unimolecular, bimolecular, etc.)
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Mar 13, 2020 2:04 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Concentration Cells
Replies: 8
Views: 132

Re: Concentration Cells

Based on concentration, one side acts as the anode and the other as the cathode. Thus, one of them is reduced and the other is oxidized, depending on which has a higher concentration and produces a current.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Mar 13, 2020 2:00 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation number
Replies: 12
Views: 219

Re: Oxidation number

Oxidation numbers tell you which species is being reduced or oxidized. You determine the loss of electrons when you balance the half-reactions accordingly.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Mar 12, 2020 11:20 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Thermodynamics problem 4.58
Replies: 2
Views: 74

Re: Thermodynamics problem 4.58

Yes, you can assume that. The volume and pressure return to the initial state.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 08, 2020 8:10 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Platinum
Replies: 10
Views: 66

Re: Platinum

You add platinum as an electrode when the reactants/products are not conductive solids.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 08, 2020 8:09 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Balancing basic reactions
Replies: 8
Views: 78

Re: Balancing basic reactions

Usually, you would add them to the side that needs oxygens. For example, reactions that involve MnO4 or Cr2O7, typically require the addition of water to the other side so that the number of oxygens are balanced. Use OH- when dealing with basic solutions. You would still add it to the side that need...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 08, 2020 8:07 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: 7.11
Replies: 1
Views: 25

Re: 7.11

The rate-determining step would have the highest activation energy, so that would have the largest hump. I am not too sure how to differentiate between the other two steps.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 08, 2020 8:06 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: How to determine the order of a reactant
Replies: 3
Views: 59

Re: How to determine the order of a reactant

You can still solve it using the same method. However, you would most likely need to know the order of the other species to solve for it or would need more algebra to go through the problem.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 08, 2020 8:04 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: units
Replies: 12
Views: 84

Re: units

In your rate law equation, you'd multiply out the units of the reactants to find the units.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 01, 2020 7:17 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: intergrated rate law
Replies: 9
Views: 111

Re: intergrated rate law

I believe they are given at the bottom of the equation sheet.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 01, 2020 7:13 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: galvanic v. voltaic
Replies: 1
Views: 22

Re: galvanic v. voltaic

They are both the same thing. They turn chemical energy into electric energy.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 01, 2020 7:11 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Textbook question 6M.7
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Textbook question 6M.7

For this question, you would want to find the least reduction potential as that implies that it is better as an oxidizing agent and thus will be better at reducing other compounds. What was your method for trying to solve this problem?
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Mar 01, 2020 7:05 pm
Forum: Interesting Applications: Rechargeable Batteries (Cell Phones, Notebooks, Cars), Fuel Cells (Space Shuttle), Photovoltaic Cells (Solar Panels), Electrolysis, Rust
Topic: Dissolved Metal
Replies: 3
Views: 82

Re: Dissolved Metal

If you are talking about solubility, there are lists you can find online. I don't remember the pneumonics to know this, but certain metals such as silver and mercury do not dissolve in water.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:19 am
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Test 2
Replies: 6
Views: 69

Re: Test 2

Because he extended it, I think he will tell us in class what to study until. It will most likely still be the end of Outline 5 and all of the electrochemistry material.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:17 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Self Test 6L.2A
Replies: 1
Views: 40

Re: Self Test 6L.2A

When writing out a diagram, the || means a salt bridge and a | means an interface between phases or a porous disc. The hydrogen cell is on the left, so you'd first write the hydrogen cell portion: H2 (g) | H+ We use the bar here because both phases are interacting. Because Pt is used as the conducto...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:11 am
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Work and Battery system
Replies: 6
Views: 69

Re: Work and Battery system

A battery will always do work because it's potential must be positive for it to provide energy to do work in the first place. Energy leaves a battery when it is being used.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:10 am
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst Equation usage
Replies: 6
Views: 59

Re: Nernst Equation usage

The Nernst equation relates the energy of a cell outside of standard conditions when the concentrations of the products and reactants change to energy in standard conditions. So, when there is a change in concentration, use the Nernst equation.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:08 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Oxidation versus reduction
Replies: 9
Views: 91

Re: Oxidation versus reduction

Yes, that is the convention when representing galvanic cells.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:26 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: ΔS for Irreversible Expansion
Replies: 3
Views: 57

Re: ΔS for Irreversible Expansion

For irreversible expansion, the only thing that changes is the values of Stotal and Ssurr. In irreversible expansion, the change in entropy of the system is the same as Stotal. Calculate S using the equations for changes in volume, but Stotal = Ssystem because Ssurr is 0.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Feb 16, 2020 3:12 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Free energy
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Free energy

The pressure of a system and the ratio of products to reactants affects how much energy can be produced.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:37 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: maximum work
Replies: 5
Views: 86

Re: maximum work

Maximum work refers to when a system is undergoing reversible expansion. that is when the maximum amount of work is done.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:36 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Work and Gibbs Free Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: Work and Gibbs Free Energy

I think it has to be when entropy is 0, and q = -w. So, there is no change in internal energy and no change in entropy.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:35 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: oxidation states (6K.1)
Replies: 2
Views: 14

Re: oxidation states (6K.1)

You would calculate it using the known oxidation states of elements. For example, O is typically -2, C is typically +4, etc. You can use this to calculate this by equating it to the total charge.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:34 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: delta G and K
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: delta G and K

Yes
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:48 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: U vs H
Replies: 15
Views: 269

Re: U vs H

Delta U is the change in internal energy, whereas delta H is the change in enthalpy. I believe delta H is the total energy change, whereas delta U only accounts for the kinetic and potential energy of a system.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:44 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: equation
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: equation

No, you must add the heat of phase changes. q = mC(Tf - Ti) only calculates how much energy it takes to increase a mass of a substance by a certain amount of degrees.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:43 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Explaining Le Chatelier’s principle
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: Explaining Le Chatelier’s principle

Say you have an exothermic reaction. If you increase the temperature, that means there is heat available to favor the endothermic reaction as that reaction requires heat. So, it will shift to the right side. If you decrease the temperature, that means that the heat lost needs to be replaced, and thu...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:40 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Calorimeter
Replies: 5
Views: 56

Re: Calorimeter

A calorimeter is an apparatus that measures heat involved in a chemical reaction. To calculate the heat of reactions, you can use heat capacity and the relationships between heat absorbed and lost.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 5:39 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Cp/Cv
Replies: 7
Views: 67

Re: Cp/Cv

You should assume constant pressure.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 03, 2020 12:19 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible
Replies: 7
Views: 61

Re: Reversible

Equilibrium by definition means something is reversible and happens in both directions. In terms of thermodynamics, we are talking about internal and external pressure being equal.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 03, 2020 12:15 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Degeneracy and Entropy
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Degeneracy and Entropy

Degeneracy refers to the possible states an object can have. So, the greater the degeneracy, the greater the entropy of the system.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 03, 2020 12:12 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Reversible/ Irreversible Expansion
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Reversible/ Irreversible Expansion

Reversible expansion always does more work than irreversible expansion. Additionally, the internal and external pressures are equal in reversible expansion.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 03, 2020 12:11 am
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Enthalpy and Internal Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: Enthalpy and Internal Energy

Since enthalpy involves reactions, volumes are bound to change.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Mon Feb 03, 2020 12:09 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Standard Reaction Enthalpy
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Standard Reaction Enthalpy

Standard Reaction Enthalpy is the heat given off or taken up during reaction. Enthalpy of formation is difference between the standard enthalpies of products and reactants.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:49 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: standard state
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: standard state

yes. Additionally, temperature and pressure should be at 25 C and 1 atm respectively.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:44 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Method 3
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Method 3

The pressure of gases are at 1 atm and the temperature is 25 C
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:43 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy w/ Temp
Replies: 6
Views: 63

Re: Enthalpy w/ Temp

An increase in temperature leads to a change in enthalpy. Increasing temperature increases enthalpy, and vice versa.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:41 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: heat rxn
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: heat rxn

There are 3 methods he described in class. You can add the bond enthalpies between the molecules and do broken - formed. If you have 2 reactions, you can add up the enthalpies to find the enthalpy of reaction for the combined one. Finally, you can use the enthalpy of formation to find it (products -...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 3:38 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: state functions
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: state functions

State functions do not care about the process to get the value. As Lavelle said in class, because this doesn't matter, you can add them up since they are specific points.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:50 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Percent Protonation
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Percent Protonation

I believe it is conjugate base/acid divided by the original compound.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:49 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Acids/Bases and Chemical Equilibrium
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Re: Acids/Bases and Chemical Equilibrium

A lot of it is the same. However, there will be a lot of working backwards (ex. using a Kb to find Ka for acid dissociation). Otherwise, most of the steps are essentially the same. If anything, you will have to write out the reaction yourself, requiring knowledge of common acids and bases and their ...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:47 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Adding an Acid or Base in Water
Replies: 3
Views: 96

Re: Adding an Acid or Base in Water

It is such a small quantity of the acid that there is not enough to completely change its pH.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:56 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Homework 6E.3
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Homework 6E.3

I believe if the Ka for the second dissociation is small enough, you can ignore the second one because little to no acid will deprotonate.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:54 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strength of Acids and Bases
Replies: 1
Views: 75

Re: Strength of Acids and Bases

Yes, sometimes. This goes back to 14A where we looked at bond length and electronegativity (for binary acids like HI and HF and bases like LiOH and NaOH), and the number of oxygens to compare oxoacids.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 12, 2020 11:12 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: When is the principle helpful?
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: When is the principle helpful?

Le Chatlier's principle shows us how to evaluate where equilibrium lies in a reaction. It is qualitative and helps us determine whether products or reactants are favored.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 12, 2020 11:10 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Solids and Liquids
Replies: 6
Views: 48

Re: Solids and Liquids

Solids and liquids are typically in excess and thus tend to not change much in equilibrium.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:57 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 5
Views: 38

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

No, because solids and liquids are always in excess. Thus, removing or adding it would not affect equilibrium.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Jan 11, 2020 7:31 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Meaning of K [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: Meaning of K [ENDORSED]

K is the ratio of products to reactants. There are numerous ways to increase the rate of reactions, such as increasing temperatures.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G.1 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: 5G.1 [ENDORSED]

I don't think higher pressure means that the equilibrium constant is larger. The constant is always set for a specific reaction regardless of pressure.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:25 am
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Porphyrin
Replies: 1
Views: 48

Re: Porphyrin

In order for it to form a coordinate compound, it has to be bonded to a transition metal.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:15 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: speed of light and protons
Replies: 3
Views: 155

Re: speed of light and protons

No, the speed of protons cannot be the same as the speed of light. It is physically impossible for this to occur.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:10 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 152

Re: Orbitals

Well, in the case of the question, we can look at part a. You know that n = 2 and l = 1, meaning that it is in the p orbital. So, the orientation of the p orbitals doesn't matter and thus, there are 3 possible orbitals. For part b, there is only one that can have those three quantum numbers because ...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:06 am
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Is trichloroacetic acid stronger than acetic acid?
Replies: 1
Views: 110

Re: Is trichloroacetic acid stronger than acetic acid?

Trichloroacetic acid is stronger. The Cls bonded to the molecule in place of the hydrogen has a greater electron-withdrawing power contributing to anion stability when it loses the proton.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:05 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong vs. Weak
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Re: Strong vs. Weak

No. Strong acids and weak acids are determined by bond length for binary compounds and electron-withdrawing power. An exception to the trend you noticed is H2SO4, which when it dissociates, becomes HSO4-, but is still a strong acid.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:31 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: NO2-
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: NO2-

Nitrogen is monodentate. The Nitrogen's lone pair is considered.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:29 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong Acids
Replies: 5
Views: 73

Re: Strong Acids

The longer the bond, the stronger the acid.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:28 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: the conjugate seesaw
Replies: 5
Views: 75

Re: the conjugate seesaw

Bases produce conjugate acids and acids produce conjugate bases. If the acid is a strong acid, its conjugate base is a weak base and vice versa.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:23 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Properties of Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Re: Properties of Bases

They react with fatty acids on the surface of your skin and produce the soapy feeling.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Nov 29, 2019 7:07 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Definition of Bronsted and Lewis
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Definition of Bronsted and Lewis

Are there any examples of a compound that is a Bronsted acid/base but not a Lewis acid/base and vice versa?
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:48 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Acid Naming
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Acid Naming

Yes, I think it is still cation before anion.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:46 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: Chelating Ligands

Basically, a chelating ligand is one that can bond multiple times to the central metal ion by forming a ring with it. This is a result of the ability to rotate about sigma bonds so that the ligand can conform its shape to create that structure.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:44 am
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Organic vs Inorganic Acids
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Organic vs Inorganic Acids

In organic acids, the hydrogen is bonded to an oxygen which is bonded to a carbon. So, the electronegativity of the oxygen is decreased because it is also sharing electrons with carbon, and thus, the hydrogen is harder to remove. With inorganic acids, the hydrogen is bonded to a highly electronegati...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:42 am
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Biological Examples
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Biological Examples

I think the ones he went over in class will be good to review and know for tests, as he did go over them in-depth (cisplatin and myoglobin).
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:40 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Acid and Base Strength
Replies: 7
Views: 95

Re: Acid and Base Strength

Strong acids and bases completely dissociates in water. Additionally, Ka and Kb (their respective equilibrium constants) will be really high because of this complete dissociation.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:42 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole-Dipole vs. Dipole-Induced Dipole
Replies: 1
Views: 50

Re: Dipole-Dipole vs. Dipole-Induced Dipole

Molecules with dipole-dipole bonds have polarity on both molecules. However, with dipole-induced dipole bonds, the polarity of another molecule causes a temporary dipole to occur in another molecule. It is possible for a molecule to have both kinds of forces, it just depends on the orientation of th...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:26 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: molecular shape vs. molecular geometry
Replies: 4
Views: 82

Re: molecular shape vs. molecular geometry

The molecular shape does not account for lone pairs of a molecule, but geometry does.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 14, 2019 11:23 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Formula
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: VSEPR Formula

A --> Central Atom
Xn --> number of bonding electrons
En --> number of lone pairs
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:36 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: London Dispersion
Replies: 13
Views: 144

Re: London Dispersion

Any molecule can induce a dipole on another molecule. So, any molecule can have these dispersion forces.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:12 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F.5 B
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: 3F.5 B

C4H9OH forms hydrogen bonds with each other b/c of the OH group at the end of the molecule, and thus has a stronger bond between the molecules. CHI3 is more polarizable and thus has a stronger IMF.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:08 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Midterm 1
Replies: 9
Views: 307

Re: Midterm 1

Given the energy for exciting one electron, divide the energy absorbed by that value.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:05 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Maximum Wavelength
Replies: 2
Views: 149

Re: Maximum Wavelength

I don't think you can find the maximum wavelength. however, you can find the minimum wavelength by equating the energy of the light to the work function and solving for wavelength using the speed of light.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 10:03 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge Equation?
Replies: 12
Views: 86

Re: Formal Charge Equation?

Yes, that is correct. The first one treats each bond as 1 electron, the other treats it as 2.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:59 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Energy Level Equations
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Re: Energy Level Equations

Yes, you can use it to calculate energy changes across energy levels.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 8:58 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarity vs Polarizability
Replies: 3
Views: 72

Re: Polarity vs Polarizability

Polarity is how charged an atom is. Polarizability is how likely it is to induce a dipole with another molecule. So the more polar a bond is, the more likely it is to polarize another molecule.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:50 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Figuring it out without the trend?
Replies: 4
Views: 55

Re: Figuring it out without the trend?

You can look at the rows they are in to determine which one is more electronegative.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:49 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy from the Review
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: Ionization Energy from the Review

The half-filled p orbital is more stable than the p orbital of oxygen. It is easier for an oxygen atom to lose/gain an electron to fill up the remaining unpaired shells as it is in a more unstable form.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:46 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Exceptions
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: Exceptions

One exception is for the ionization energy of group 15 and 16 elements. Although it typically increases across a row, the ionization energy of group 16 elements is actually less than group 15 elements because the half-filled orbital is more stable, and harder to remove an electron.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:26 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 1D. 11 prob
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: 1D. 11 prob

l corresponds to one of the s, p, d, or f subshells. So, based on that, you can determine the number of orbital.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:41 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Delocalization
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Delocalization

It means that the electrons in bonds are not set. For example, with benzene, the double bonds in the ring are not set. There are other configurations of it, and so you shouldn't see it as one set bond arrangement.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:32 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Week 5 Homework
Replies: 9
Views: 101

Re: Week 5 Homework

Do problems from chemical bonds.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:32 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Number of Valence Electrons
Replies: 5
Views: 86

Re: Number of Valence Electrons

The number of valence electrons is 7 for manganese. It includes the 3d orbital electrons because the difference in energy between the 3d orbital and 4s is very small, so they essentially are in the same energy level. However, transition metals can have multiple valence states, so technically 2 or 7 ...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:03 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: HW Question 1.31
Replies: 1
Views: 77

Re: HW Question 1.31

If I understand this scenario correctly, I would assume that the beam of light is ejecting an electron from the lithium and it is detected by the sensor. This essentially is the photoelectric effect, as you have light pointing at a metal that is causing an electron to be ejected. You are dealing wit...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 16, 2019 3:15 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: X Y and Z
Replies: 7
Views: 120

Re: X Y and Z

It depends on which energy level the electron is in as well as the convention the problem uses when listing l values. The plane will correspond to the appropriate electron plane. I recommend watching the corresponding module for this lecture as he shows an example where he does just this.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:46 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Problem from Audio Visual Focus Topic
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: Problem from Audio Visual Focus Topic

You would solve this using the delta E equation. Substitute hv (Planck's constant * frequency) for delta E and set up the other side using the difference in energy (-hR/n^2-(-hR)/n^2). Plug in the appropriate numbers and solve. Don't forget to inverse and square root properly and you should get the ...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 16, 2019 2:42 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Fundamentals Problem Question
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Re: Fundamentals Problem Question

For this problem, you need two separate equations to answer both parts. For part a, the net ionic equation represents only the ions that participate in the reaction to form the precipitate. So, you would have one with copper and hydroxide on the reactant side, and on the other, the precipitate by it...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:55 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1B #9
Replies: 5
Views: 64

Re: 1B #9

Calculate the frequency first using the wavelength of the light. Then, use that frequency to calculate the energy of an individual photon. Divide 32 by that value and multiply by 2 to get the number of photons emitted in 2 seconds. For the second part, divide by Avogadro's number to get number of mo...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:52 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1B #19
Replies: 2
Views: 60

Re: 1B #19

Use the De Broglie wavelength equation to solve for the wavelengths of both. Then, divide the wavelength of the neutron by the proton's so that you get the percentage.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:47 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Fundamentals L35
Replies: 5
Views: 136

Re: Fundamentals L35

T is metric tons and it is 1,000 kilograms or 1,000,000 grams.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:44 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: H.7 Catalysts [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 236

Re: H.7 Catalysts [ENDORSED]

Catalysts typically lower the activation energy of a reaction so that it can happen faster. I assume that the catalyst does the same in that reaction.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:40 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Energy of Photon = Work Function
Replies: 4
Views: 62

Energy of Photon = Work Function

What happens when the energy of the photon is equal to the work function? How is the electron emitted if there is no excess energy to be converted into kinetic energy?
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:30 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Range of Sig Figs
Replies: 8
Views: 110

Re: Range of Sig Figs

2.9995 would be correct because you round to the appropriate number of sig figs.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Wed Oct 09, 2019 2:32 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Atomic Spectra: Energy Levels
Replies: 3
Views: 68

Re: Atomic Spectra: Energy Levels

Yes, the calculations would be for that. There might also be problems where they have you solve for the energies of a quantum level given the change in energy and the final or initial energy or solve for wavelengths, frequencies, etc. You can also look at the homework problems for the corresponding ...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:23 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamental G.13
Replies: 4
Views: 85

Re: Fundamental G.13

First, you must solve for the new concentration after the florist dilutes it with 3 more liters of water. Using this molarity, you can calculate the number of moles each plant receives in the 100 mL. Now, for every mole of fertilizer, there are 2 moles of nitrogen. So, using this ratio, you can solv...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:18 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: M1V1=M2V2 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 450

Re: M1V1=M2V2 [ENDORSED]

This equation demonstrates that initial and final moles are always equal when diluting a solution. So, yes, when you do multiply it out, the units for volume cancel out, but you are left with the number of moles. This equation helps us calculate volume needed for dilutions or new concentrations usin...
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Tue Oct 01, 2019 8:58 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Question M9
Replies: 1
Views: 44

Re: Question M9

Net ionic equations only show the reactants that participate in the reaction. Since the reaction produces a copper hydroxide, the only reactants that matter are the copper and hydroxide. The sodium dissociates in the solution and does not contribute to the precipitate.
by SnehinRajkumar1L
Tue Oct 01, 2019 8:50 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Question H7a
Replies: 6
Views: 75

Re: Question H7a

Hydroxide has a -1 charge. Group 2 elements (including calcium), always have a +2 charge. So, for the charges to balance you would need 2 hydroxide molecules for the calcium ion. This applies to Group 1 elements where they always have a +1 charge. Elements in group 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17 have a +3, ...

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