Search found 63 matches

by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Jan 16, 2020 11:53 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5J.5 d
Replies: 3
Views: 11

5J.5 d

State whether reactants or products will be favored by an increase in the total pressure (resulting from compression) on each of the following equilibria. If there is no change, explain why that is so. (d) 2 HD(g) ∆ H2(g) 1 D2(g) In the solutions manual, they explain that there is not change in whet...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:26 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.13 c
Replies: 1
Views: 10

5I.13 c

Use your results from parts (a) and (b) to determine which is thermodynamically more stable relative to its atoms at 1000. K, Cl2 or F2. The Kc for Cl2 was 1.2 x 10^-7 and the Kc for F2 was 1.2 x 10^-4. Why is Cl2 more stable than F2? Does stability just mean that the reactants (either Cl2 or F2 in ...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Jan 09, 2020 1:07 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Q versus K
Replies: 4
Views: 17

Q versus K

Can someone explain the different between K and Q? How can Q be used to tell us the direction the reaction will proceed? Thanks in advance!
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Jan 09, 2020 1:02 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G.1C
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: 5G.1C

The equilibrium constant is not affected by the initial partial pressures of the reactant due to Le Chatlier's principle. This principle states that when stress is placed on the system (such as increasing the partial pressure of a reactant), then the equilibrium will shift in order to counteract tha...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:54 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K values
Replies: 4
Views: 16

Re: K values

When K is less than 10^-3, we can say with certainty that the reaction strongly favors reactants. However when K is between 10^-3 and 1, the concentration of the reactants will be slightly higher than the concentration of the products. Therefore, I would assume that the reaction slightly favors the ...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:39 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kc vs K
Replies: 6
Views: 45

Re: Kc vs K

Kc is used when calculating the equilibrium constant using concentration, whereas Kp is used for calculating the equilibrium constant using partial pressure. However, as Dr. Lavelle explained in lecture, K can be used as an abbreviation to represent either Kc or Kp, depending on the context of the p...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Tue Jan 07, 2020 7:24 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G.9
Replies: 3
Views: 51

5G.9

In the solutions for 5G.9, the book writes the equilibrium constants using the concentrations opposed to the partial pressures. However, since the products and reactants are gasses, wouldn't it be more correct to use the partial pressure? Thanks in advance
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:52 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Transition Metal Cations
Replies: 1
Views: 15

Transition Metal Cations

How do transition metal cations function as enzymes? Is this important for the exam?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:37 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Vitamin B12
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Vitamin B12

What is the structure of Vitamin B12? I know that Co is the transition metal that makes up the central atom, but what is the ligand? Also, what is its biological significance and how does the structure enable vitamin B12 to perform its function? Thanks in advance
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Dec 02, 2019 10:25 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Heme Complex
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Heme Complex

In the marshmallow problems,it asks what the oxidation state of Fe in the heme complex is. How do we find this? it also asks about the porphryn ligand. What is this? Is it mono or poly dentate? Is this something we need to memorize?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Dec 02, 2019 2:50 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: 6C.21
Replies: 2
Views: 44

6C.21

Suggest an explanation for the different strengths of (b) acetic acid and formic acid.

Can someone explain why formic acid is a stronger acid than acetic acid? Is it because is looses protons more easily? Thank you
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Dec 02, 2019 2:16 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: 6C.17
Replies: 2
Views: 34

6C.17

Which is the stronger base, the hypobromite ion, BrO2, or morphine, C17H19O3N? Justify your answer.

How would you answer this question? Thank you
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 8:42 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Sig Figs for logarithmic funcitons
Replies: 6
Views: 57

Sig Figs for logarithmic funcitons

How do sig figs work on logarithmic functions when doing pH calculations?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:37 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How to tell
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: How to tell

You need to look at the chemical formula and see if the molecule is more likely to accept or donate an H+ ion. Since NH3 has a lone pair on the N, it is more likely to accept a proton and is therefore considered a weak base. However, it's also good to memorize common acids and bases.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:29 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Number
Replies: 6
Views: 33

Re: Coordination Number

Jorge Ramirez_4H wrote:Is there a good way of memorizing this?


You don't need to memorize the coordination number for each coordination compound. Just look at the number of ligands in the square brackets of the chemical formula and you should be able to find it.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:25 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelate and polydentate
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Chelate and polydentate

Can someone explain what a chelating ligand is and why it's important? Also, how is this related to a ligand being polydentate?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:17 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: How to Know the Charge of Ions
Replies: 7
Views: 45

Re: How to Know the Charge of Ions

Unfortunately, the only way to know the charge of a common poly atomic ions, such as SO4 2-, is through memorization. I recommend flashcards. And Lavelle won't give us the ligand table for naming coordination compounds, we have to memorize that as well.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:13 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: 6A.9 a
Replies: 3
Views: 38

6A.9 a

Which of the following can be classified as reactions between Brønsted acids and bases? For those that can be so classified, identify the acid and the base. (Hint: It might help to write the net ionic equations.) (a) NH4I(aq) + H2O(l) -> NH3(aq) + H3O1(aq) + I2(aq) Would the acid in this case be NH4...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 4:29 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Cyano vs cyanido
Replies: 1
Views: 11

Cyano vs cyanido

In lecture, Lavelle mentioned that we should write cyano for CN- in cooridation compounds, but the book says we should write cyanido. Which is correct?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:55 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Lewis Acids
Replies: 4
Views: 24

Re: Lewis Acids

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by regular acids, but if I understand correctly, a Lewis acid is a regular acid. A Lewis acid is simply a way to define chemically what an acid is. By definition, a Lewis acid is an electron acceptor, which provides a visual representation what what an acid does in...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:49 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Bronsted vs. Lewis Acids
Replies: 9
Views: 41

Re: Bronsted vs. Lewis Acids

A Bronsted atom is a proton donor, whereas a Lewis acid is an electron acceptor. While the definition of these acids are different, they are complimentary, meaning that if a molecule is a Lewis acid it is also a Bronsted acid. Therefore, both definitions are acceptable.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:35 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Chloro vs Chloride
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: Chloro vs Chloride

The suffix -ide is used for the naming of common anions. For example, Cl-1 is named "chloride," and S2- is named "sulfide." However, as Lavelle stated in lecture on Friday, when naming coordination compounds, you drop the -ide from the anion name and add the suffix -o. Therefore,...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:28 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Heme complex
Replies: 8
Views: 48

Re: Heme complex

The heme complex is an iron ion bound to a porphyrin ligand, which is a cage like molecule consisting of four tetradentate square planar nitrogen molecules. When the heme complex binds to a protein, it creates myglobin. Myglobin is important because the structure of the molecule allows the iron ion ...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:18 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Cisplatin
Replies: 15
Views: 91

Re: Cisplatin

The Cl atoms on the clisplatin molecule bind to the exposed N on two nearby (but not necessarily next to each other) guanine nucleotides, forming a coordination compound with the DNA molecule. The bound cisplatin blocks DNA replication machinery, preventing the DNA from replicating and ultimately st...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:00 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Intermolecular Force Strengths
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Intermolecular Force Strengths

Should we memorize the approximate strengths of each intermolecular force? Or is it sufficient to know the strengths relative to each other (ie knowing that hydrogen bonding is stronger than dipole-dipole, etc)
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 17, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 2E.21 d
Replies: 2
Views: 16

2E.21 d

IN 2E.21, the answer key says that the bond angle of N2H2 is 107 degrees. Are we expected to be able to predict this, or is saying the angle is less than 109.5 degrees sufficient?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:38 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: polar and nonpolar
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: polar and nonpolar

I believe that the example of the cis and trans molecule served as an example of how two molecules with the same molecular formula but different arrangements can be either polar or non polar, depending on whether the dipole moments cancel. Since the cis molecule had the Cl atoms on the same side of ...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:32 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bonds strength
Replies: 4
Views: 35

Re: Bonds strength

A double bond isn't twice as strong as a single bond because there are electron electron repulsions in the double bond that slightly reduce the strength.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:28 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent vs angular
Replies: 1
Views: 25

Bent vs angular

In the book, they use the term angular, but does the term bent also apply?Thank you
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:49 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: 3F.13
Replies: 2
Views: 43

3F.13

Identify the arrangement (I, II, or III; all molecules are CH2Cl2) that should possess the strongest intermolecular attractions, and justify your selection. (there's an image in the textbook). How are we supposed to be able to tell the difference in the arrangements of these molecules? I cannot see ...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: 3F.3 c
Replies: 1
Views: 14

3F.3 c

Which way is the dipole pointing on CHCl2? I don't understand why this molecule experiences dipole-dipole attraction. Thanks
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:40 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: 3F.1 d
Replies: 1
Views: 23

3F.1 d

Identify the types of attractive intermolecular interactions that might arise between molecules of each of the following substances: (d) SO2. The solutions manual said this molecule experiences London dispersion forces and dipole-dipole attraction. How does it have dipole-dipole attraction? Which wa...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Wed Nov 06, 2019 10:08 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Line Drawings Outline 3
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Line Drawings Outline 3

On outline three, it says we should be able to "Draw line structures of organic compounds." I don't remember Lavelle going over this, should we know it for the midterm?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:00 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic vs molecular spectroscopy: outline 2 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 59

Atomic vs molecular spectroscopy: outline 2 [ENDORSED]

On outline 2, the seventh bullet point says: "With respect to electron transitions that give rise to a UV or visible spectrum: understand the difference between electronic transitions in atomic orbitals (atomic spectroscopy) and electronic transitions in molecular orbitals (molecular spectrosco...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 12:40 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: 2D.19
Replies: 1
Views: 25

2D.19

"Use the covalent radii in Fig. 2D.11 to calculate the bond lengths in the following molecules. Account for the trends in your calculated values: (a) CF 4; (b) SiF 4; (c) SnF 4"

Can someone explain how to do this? Thank you
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:46 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Dino Nugs 12b
Replies: 5
Views: 40

Re: Dino Nugs 12b

Does Cl04- not have any resonance structures? I thought it did have resonance, but it makes more sense to me that oxygen has the negative charge because it's more electronegative. It does have resonance structures, since three of the oxygen are double bonded to the Cl and the other has a single bon...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:44 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: 2C.3
Replies: 3
Views: 38

2C.3

In 2C.3 c, the book asked up to draw the Lewis Structure for chloric acid. The answer gave three structures, two of which had expanded octets. Would all of these be considered resonance structures, or is the final structure they gave (the one with lowest energy charge) technically correct? Thanks
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:51 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Atoms to Moles
Replies: 6
Views: 95

Re: Atoms to Moles

Yes. Since Avogadro's number is in particles/mol, dividing the number of atoms by Avogadro's number will give you the number of mols.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:48 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Delocalized electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Delocalized electrons

When electrons are delocalized, it means that they aren't associated with a single atom or covalent bond. We can see this in resonance structures, where the Lewis structure can have multiple equivalent locations for a bond, such as a double bond. Here, the observed bond lengths are between the exper...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Dino Nugs 12b
Replies: 5
Views: 40

Dino Nugs 12b

On Dino Nuggets question 12b, why does ClO4- have three double bonds and not four? I know that with three double bonds the Cl will have a formal charge of zero and the single bonded O will have a formal charge of -1, but why is this more stable than the Cl having four double bonds and a formal charg...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:57 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Assigning Orbitals to Elements
Replies: 4
Views: 34

Re: Assigning Orbitals to Elements

It doesn’t matter if an electron is in the px, py, or pz orbital, but you must follow Hunds rule and ensure that each orbital is filled before electrons are paired.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:54 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: atomic Radii
Replies: 11
Views: 43

Re: atomic Radii

Yes, this is true. However, you have to remember that going across a period, the number of electrons is increasing, but so is the effective nuclear charge. Therefore, the atomic radius gets smaller across a period, but increases down a group.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:50 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Question on 1F.5 b
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: Question on 1F.5 b

The ionization energy is the energy it takes to remove an electron from an atom. Ionization energies are paired with atomic radius. Since atomic radius increases from left to right on the periodic table so does ionization energy. Na is to the left of Mg so this would mean that Na has the smaller at...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:40 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Octet
Replies: 6
Views: 29

Expanded Octet

Can someone please explain why certain elements can have an expanded octet?
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:30 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Question 1E.25
Replies: 1
Views: 19

Question 1E.25

"Give the notation for the valence-shell configuration (including the outermost d-electrons) of (c) Group 5 transition metals."

Can someone please explain this? The answer says it is (n-1)d5ns2, but i thought it was (n-1)d3ns2. Thanks!
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:02 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Coulomb's Law
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Coulomb's Law

Can someone help explain the significance of Coulomb's Law to me? I don't understand why Coulombs Law states that the electrostatic energy is lower at a larger distance, but electrons further from the nucleus have higher energies. These statements seem to contradict each other, so I'm confused. Than...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:54 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Linear Momentum
Replies: 6
Views: 61

Re: Linear Momentum

Linear momentum is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. It is a vector quantity with units of kg*m/s, and is conserved.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:50 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Threshold Energy
Replies: 7
Views: 51

Re: Threshold Energy

If the energy of the light matches the threshold energy, then electrons will be emitted from the surface. If the energy of light is greater than the threshold energy, then the electrons emitted will have increasing kinetic energy.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Tue Oct 15, 2019 10:16 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: 1B. 25
Replies: 1
Views: 29

Re: 1B. 25

1.054 457x10^-34 isn't the value for h, but it is actually the value of h bar. H bar is equal to h/(2pi), and is denoted as an h with a line through the top. Although it's used in the uncertainty principle in the book, it's not necessary to know it because it's just a shorthand.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Oct 14, 2019 2:23 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Problem 1B.27
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Problem 1B.27

A bowling ball of mass 8.00 kg is rolled down a bowling alley lane at 5.00 +/- 5.0 m/s. What is the minimum uncertainty in its position? In the answer key, they used 5.00 m/s as the uncertainty in velocity (delta v). Why wouldn't the uncertainty be 10.00 m/s? I thought it would be that because 10.00...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:34 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Question on 1A 11
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Question on 1A 11

The grouping has to do with both the wavelength of the emitted photon and the quantum level. The lyman involves jumps to or from the n=1 energy level. Therefore, the change in energy will be greater, causing the emitted photon to have a larger frequency and therefore a smaller wavelength. Thus, the ...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:18 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Balmer Series
Replies: 1
Views: 48

Balmer Series

In the book, it says that the Balmer Series consists of lines in the visible region of the spectrum where n1=2. However, in class, Lavelle said that in the Balmer series the electron transitions to n=2, meaning that the final state, n2, is 2 (n2=2). These two statements contradict each other. Am I m...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Oct 10, 2019 5:15 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Help on A1.15
Replies: 4
Views: 64

Re: Help on A1.15

Thank you, but can anyone explain how to do this using Lavelle's method? He doesn't use the Rydberg equation, he uses the change in energy.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Oct 10, 2019 4:00 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Help on A1.15
Replies: 4
Views: 64

Help on A1.15

"In the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen, a line is observed at 102.6 nm. Determine the values of n for the initial and final energy levels of the electron during the emission of energy that leads to this spectral line" Can someone please walk me through this problem using Professor...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Tue Oct 08, 2019 12:25 am
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Test 1 Outline Question
Replies: 4
Views: 74

Test 1 Outline Question

On Lavelle's Test One outline, one of the bulleted points is:
"Use various means of representing molecules and write formulas from molecular structures."
What does this mean? Any help would be appreciated. Thank you!
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Oct 07, 2019 5:29 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Question 1A.3 c
Replies: 5
Views: 73

Question 1A.3 c

Which of the following happens when the frequency of electromagnetic radiation decreases? Explain your reasoning. (c) The extent of the change in the electrical field at a given point decreases I’m confused on this question, and the detailed answer didn’t make sense to me. Can someone please explain...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:05 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Question L35
Replies: 2
Views: 49

Re: Question L35

I believe that the textbook made an error. The third equation should be written with Fe3Br8 instead of FeBr2. This can then be balanced as explained above.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:05 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Please clarify what M means
Replies: 5
Views: 55

Re: Please clarify what M means

Capital M stands for molarity, which is mols/liter. When you see "0.4M," you can read it as "0.4 molar," which helps me remember that it is talking about molarity.
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:01 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: G.25
Replies: 1
Views: 35

G.25

"Practitioners of the branch of alternative medicine known as homeopathy claim that very dilute solutions of substances can have an effect. Is the claim plausible? To explore this question, suppose that you prepare a solution of a supposedly active substance, X, with a molar concentration of 0....
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:47 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Homework Problem G.17
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: Homework Problem G.17

Does anyone know if having the 5H20 on copper sulfate changes the moles of copper sulfate needed to create a .20M solution? Because we would be adding water to the solution as we add the copper sulfate, which would change the volume I don't think that the moles of copper sulfate would change becaus...
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Sep 30, 2019 3:17 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: F3 Naming compunds
Replies: 2
Views: 45

F3 Naming compunds

F3 asks us to write the formula for nitric acid. I know the answer is HNO3, but can someone help me review the rules for naming/writing the formulas for acids and bases? Thanks, I'm a little rusty!
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Sep 30, 2019 2:56 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Symbol for Molarity
Replies: 7
Views: 75

Symbol for Molarity

Sort of a general question are the symbols for molar mass and molarity both M? Is there any way to distinguish between the two (other than the context of the problem)? Thanks in advance!
by Gabriella Bates 2L
Mon Sep 30, 2019 2:36 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Advice from a Medical Student - Part II [ENDORSED]
Replies: 128
Views: 2859

Re: Advice from a Medical Student - Part II [ENDORSED]

Thank you for sharing, it's great to hear your story! I was wondering if you participated in any extracurriculars during your time at UCLA that helped you gain medical experience? Also do you have any advice for chem 14A? Thank you!

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