Search found 35 matches

by 305376058
Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:34 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent vs linear
Replies: 56
Views: 794

Re: Bent vs linear

The bent molecule contains lone pairs, linear does not.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:33 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: melting point
Replies: 8
Views: 95

Re: melting point

The melting point would most likely decrease.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 13
Views: 117

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Typically, yes, because the hydrogen is attracted to atoms N, O, and F, that have stronger partial negative charges.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:30 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Hybridization
Replies: 7
Views: 62

Re: Hybridization

It is when an atom uses both its s and p orbitals to bond, in cases where the number of bonds exceeds the number available in the unhybridized state.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: AXE Format
Replies: 34
Views: 240

Re: AXE Format

You can just write one X or E- it's like writing X in an equation.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:48 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 2
Views: 58

Re: Radicals

Since oxygen has greater electronegativity, it will attract the lone electron.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:46 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis structure
Replies: 5
Views: 56

Re: Lewis structure

The phosphorus in the center is less electronegative than oxygen so it wouldn't make sense for it to attract such a large negative charge. Additionally, it is less stable in general for any one element in the structure to have such a large charge.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:44 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Drawing Lewis Structures
Replies: 18
Views: 156

Re: Drawing Lewis Structures

They should not always have a formal charge of zero. Instead, the formal charges should equal to the overall charge of what you are drawing.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:42 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal Charges
Replies: 15
Views: 147

Re: Formal Charges

Since the central atom is typically the least electronegative, it probably should not have a negative charge. I think that, in general, it is best for the central atom not to have a formal charge.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:41 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Electronegative
Replies: 14
Views: 123

Re: Electronegative

Yes, elements with stronger electronegativity are more likely to attract electrons.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:59 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: central atom
Replies: 16
Views: 246

Re: central atom

The atom in the center should be the one with the least electronegativity.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: formal charge
Replies: 6
Views: 40

Re: formal charge

I don't think it is necessarily required, but it does help ensure that you draw the most stable compound.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:57 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Re: Lewis Structure

Yes, you do.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 12
Views: 110

Re: Lone Pairs

You figure out the number of pairs not included in one of the bonds.
by 305376058
Sun Nov 03, 2019 10:54 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Drawing lewis structures
Replies: 5
Views: 61

Re: Drawing lewis structures

When drawing Lewis structures, I think you should try to draw the one with the lowest formal charge possible.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:55 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 2.A.17
Replies: 3
Views: 44

Re: 2.A.17

When it is positive, that means they lost electrons, so you look at their valence number and subtract the amount of the charge.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:53 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Valence Electrons
Replies: 16
Views: 210

Re: Valence Electrons

You can look at the group number to figure this out.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:51 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Bonds
Replies: 14
Views: 155

Re: Covalent Bonds

Yes, it is only between nonmetals!
by 305376058
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:49 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Metalloids
Replies: 5
Views: 64

Re: Metalloids

They can do either!
by 305376058
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:41 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Metals Vs. Nonmetals
Replies: 8
Views: 183

Re: Metals Vs. Nonmetals

Metals tend to form cations, while nonmetals form anions. This is because metals typically lose from their valence shells in order to obtain a full outer shell because it would require more energy to gain them.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:04 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron affinity
Replies: 5
Views: 138

Re: Electron affinity

Electron affinity is essentially how attracted an atom is to an electron. It is highest toward the upper right part of the periodic table with the exception of the noble gases because their shells are already filled.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:56 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Atomic Radius
Replies: 16
Views: 256

Re: Atomic Radius

I think you can only do it when they are in the ground state!
by 305376058
Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:18 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: homework 1A.3
Replies: 8
Views: 98

Re: homework 1A.3

When frequency decreases, wavelength increases because the two have an inverse relationship.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:14 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: What are the units of hertz
Replies: 41
Views: 412

Re: What are the units of hertz

Hertz can also be expressed as s^-1, which means one cycle per second
by 305376058
Sun Oct 20, 2019 6:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Unit for Wavelength
Replies: 34
Views: 313

Re: Unit for Wavelength

Wavelength is a measure of distance, so it will typically be in some variation of meters (nanometers, picometers, etc.).
by 305376058
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:29 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Calculate using kg or g?
Replies: 13
Views: 407

Re: Calculate using kg or g?

I think that leaving the answer in grams is okay, but it might depend on the question being asked.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:27 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Molar Ratio
Replies: 4
Views: 105

Re: Molar Ratio

Molar ratios express the proportion of moles between elements in a reaction. To find the molar ratio, you would balance an equation and then look at the coeffecients.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:24 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Angstrom
Replies: 16
Views: 425

Re: Angstrom

Angstroms are used to measure bond length and are expressed as 1*10^-10m
by 305376058
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:23 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Accuracy vs Precision
Replies: 11
Views: 218

Re: Accuracy vs Precision

Accuracy cares about how close a measurement taken is to some accepted, agreed upon value. Precision, however, refers to how reproducible a measurement is (in other words, when measuring something, do you get around the same value each time). Precision does not care about an accepted value for the i...
by 305376058
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:20 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Conversion
Replies: 6
Views: 263

Re: Conversion

These measure different things. A joule measures work, and can have the units of a Newton meter, while a meter just measures length.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:18 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Number of significant figures
Replies: 5
Views: 58

Re: Number of significant figures

The number of significant figures used depends on the numbers present in the given problem. Sig figs rely on the number given in the problem with the lowest number of significant figures.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:16 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Alternative to Guess and Check?
Replies: 5
Views: 65

Re: Alternative to Guess and Check?

I usually find that starting with the element that occurs the least on both sides works best. For example, if carbon was only in one place on both sides, I would start with that. This helps prevent some of the guessing and checking as you can usually build up to some of the reoccurring elements.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:03 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Percent or theoretical yield
Replies: 14
Views: 703

Re: Percent or theoretical yield

Percent yield involves both the actual and theoretical yield (the formula is actual/theoretical x100). The theoretical yield assumes that everything in the reaction occurred in perfect conditions, which is not the case in practice. Therefore, the percent yield shows the difference.
by 305376058
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:01 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Calculating Theoretical Yield
Replies: 9
Views: 163

Re: Calculating Theoretical Yield

Once you find your limiting reactant, you use the number of moles of that reactant that are present, because the limiting reactant is what dictates the amount ultimately produced through the reaction. This is how you find out what the theoretical yield should be, and you can then compare that to the...
by 305376058
Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:57 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: limiting reactant
Replies: 9
Views: 203

Re: limiting reactant

The limiting reactant is not necessarily always the one with the smallest number of moles. To determine which reactant is limiting, you have to compare the moles of each reactant to the ratios in the balanced chemical equation.

Go to advanced search