Search found 101 matches

by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Mar 16, 2020 11:04 pm
Forum: *Enzyme Kinetics
Topic: catalysts
Replies: 4
Views: 78

Re: catalysts

The catalyst would have an effect in whichever step it was involved in. It would affect both the forwards and reverse rate.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:31 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: comparing rates
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: comparing rates

Yes, the rates would be the same because one mole of reactant results in one mole of product.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:29 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Arrhenius equation
Replies: 5
Views: 33

Re: Arrhenius equation

A is a variable that represents the proportion of interactions that have the minimum activation energy and are in the right orientation.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:29 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 4
Views: 91

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

Le Chatlier's principle says that a system will adjust to maintain its conditions. For example, if temperature increases, the system will try to counteract the change.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:05 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: isobaric compression
Replies: 7
Views: 143

Re: isobaric compression

Using the formula PV=nRT, you can change V and P by accounting for differences in the other variables (ex: temperature).
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:03 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: How do you know a cell can do work?
Replies: 7
Views: 49

Re: How do you know a cell can do work?

A difference in cell potential (Ecell not Ecell naught) means the cell can do work.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:02 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: activation energy units
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: activation energy units

The units for activation energy are joules/mol. Joules gives the energy and the moles makes it standard for the reaction.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:01 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: U vs H
Replies: 15
Views: 269

Re: U vs H

Delta U is change in internal energy, while delta H is change in enthalpy. Under certain conditions, they can be equal to each other.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:01 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: reversing reactions
Replies: 14
Views: 177

Re: reversing reactions

When you reverse the reaction, you have to invert K. Therefore, for a forward reaction, the equilibrium constant is equal to K. For the reverse reaction, the equilibrium constant is equal to 1/K.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 5:58 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: HW 6.57
Replies: 6
Views: 133

Re: HW 6.57

If you write the Ka out, it is [H+][A-] and in order to get [H+], you would need to take the square root of the value.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 5:57 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: q and delta H
Replies: 4
Views: 104

Re: q and delta H

q is equal to delta H under the condition that pressure is constant.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 5:56 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Enaught in Concentration Cells
Replies: 4
Views: 84

Re: Enaught in Concentration Cells

The equation that relates E and delta G uses Ecell and delta G, not delta G naught. As a result, even if Ecell naught is zero, Ecell could not be zero, so delta G does not have to be zero.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Mar 12, 2020 5:53 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Fast and Slow Step Reactions
Replies: 5
Views: 84

Re: Fast and Slow Step Reactions

The slow step is the rate determining step. The fast step could be before or after the sloe step.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Wed Mar 11, 2020 2:49 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: same equation?
Replies: 5
Views: 53

Re: same equation?

The equations are the same, they’re just written differently.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 2:46 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Instantaneous and average reaction rate
Replies: 4
Views: 37

Re: Instantaneous and average reaction rate

Rate laws are given for instantaneous rates.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 2:45 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: how to know actual order
Replies: 4
Views: 95

Re: how to know actual order

First order means the exponent is equal to one. The exponent is based on the rate order, not the coefficient.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 2:44 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: rate constants
Replies: 19
Views: 248

Re: rate constants

Yes, rate constants are always positive because they represent concentration which is based on mass (always positive).
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 2:42 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Graph
Replies: 9
Views: 137

Re: Graph

The graph will look linear and the slope is -k.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 2:41 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: activation energy/ energy barrier
Replies: 6
Views: 77

Re: activation energy/ energy barrier

The activation energy is how much energy the reaction requires to proceed and this is for both endergonic and exergonic reactions. When there is not enough energy to overcome this barrier, the reaction will not proceed.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 3:27 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Slow and Fast step
Replies: 2
Views: 64

Re: Slow and Fast step

It will most likely be given to you, but you can also work backwards from the rate law to determine the slow step.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 3:26 am
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: instantaneous rate
Replies: 16
Views: 145

Re: instantaneous rate

Instantaneous rate is more accurate for a specific time, while average gives you the overall rate of the reaction.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 3:25 am
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: derivations
Replies: 9
Views: 137

Re: derivations

I would focus on the derivations that were given in class, specifically those for 1, 2, and 0 order.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 3:24 am
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: units of T
Replies: 11
Views: 423

Re: units of T

Make sure units are consistent in all your calculations. Generally, time should be reported in seconds.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 3:23 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Units
Replies: 3
Views: 73

Re: Units

For units, make sure you use the units of the components that go in. The order of the rate constant will determine the units.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Mar 08, 2020 3:23 am
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Units
Replies: 3
Views: 73

Re: Units

For units, make sure you use the units of the components that go in. The order of the rate constant will determine the units.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:20 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Cp and Cv
Replies: 4
Views: 71

Re: Cp and Cv

Cp is the heat capacity at constant pressure. Cv is the heat capacity at constant volume. According to PV = nRT, if temperature is changing, that means one other variable also has to change and this could be number of moles, pressure, or volume. It is important to know which ones are constant when c...
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:18 am
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: units
Replies: 9
Views: 77

Re: units

w is given in joules. Some problems may represent it as kJ so it is important to pay attention.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:17 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Constant pressure
Replies: 19
Views: 190

Re: Constant pressure

Yes, they would be referring to a constant external pressure.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:17 am
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Textbook question 4A.13
Replies: 5
Views: 59

Re: Textbook question 4A.13

The reaction is transferring heat to its surroundings, so the system itself is losing heat. Therefore, it will have a negative value.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:16 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Insulated system
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: Insulated system

Delta S = q / t. An insulated system has no change in temperature, so the value of T in the denominator is not going to change. However, even though the initial and final temperatures of the system are the same, it would change throughout the progress of the reaction. Therefore, there can still be h...
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:12 am
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: HW Question 4H.9
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: HW Question 4H.9

Vibrational activity would have more degeneracy than nonvibrational activity, so Sc>Sb. Monatomic gases have more degeneracy than diatomic gases because there are more possible states for them to exist in. Therefore, the final answer is Sb < Sc < Sa.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:10 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Heat capacity
Replies: 4
Views: 40

Re: Heat capacity

If you are not given a specific heat, you can use the generic formula for a gas. It depends on both the shape and conditions of the molecules observed. For an ideal gas in atomic form, Cv = (3/2)R and Cp = (5/2)R.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:08 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: 4F12
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: 4F12

R is the gas constant and C is a heat capacity.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:05 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Question 4.37
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: Question 4.37

In general, if delta G is negative, then the reaction is spontaneous. Simply knowing change in entropy or heat does not directly tell you if a reaction is spontaneous or not.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Feb 06, 2020 11:02 am
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Entropy Decreasing, Temperature Increasing
Replies: 6
Views: 57

Re: Entropy Decreasing, Temperature Increasing

At a higher temperature, entropy is already higher than it would be at a lower temperature. As a result, the change in entropy will be lower.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:34 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: q vs k
Replies: 9
Views: 50

Re: q vs k

Q represents the current state of the system but K is the equilibrium state. Eventually, Q will go towards K.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:32 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: definition of a buffer
Replies: 8
Views: 123

Re: definition of a buffer

A buffer is a solution that resists changes in pH and it’s made by mixing a weak acid/base with its conjugate.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:31 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Delta H
Replies: 10
Views: 360

Re: Delta H

If delta H is negative, it is exothermic. If delta H is positive, it is endothermic.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:30 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Writing K Expression
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: Writing K Expression

You include all aqueous solutions and gases in the K expression.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:28 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE tables
Replies: 5
Views: 48

Re: ICE tables

You use an ICE table to observe how concentrations change at equilibrium.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:27 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Combined gas law
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Combined gas law

You use the combined gas law to convert from liters of gas to moles.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:26 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: increasing yield
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Re: increasing yield

Remove products from the reaction so Q is less than K.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:24 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Autoprotolysis
Replies: 15
Views: 144

Re: Autoprotolysis

It is when a molecule transfers a proton to another one of the same molecule.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:23 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 6
Views: 38

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

If the change in pressure changed the volume, it affects the concentration. If the change in pressure was caused by the addition of an intert gas, the volume hasn't changed so the concentrations have not changed.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Wed Jan 15, 2020 1:23 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: When to omit "x-term"
Replies: 6
Views: 61

Re: When to omit "x-term"

You omit the -x term when the equilibrium constant is very small (less than 10^3) because those changes are too small to have a significant effect on the concentration of reactants.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Exercise 5G.1
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: Exercise 5G.1

C is asking about the equilibrium constant, which is a fixed value. D is asking about equilibrium concentrations, which depend on the initial reactions.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:52 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Pressure and Volume
Replies: 8
Views: 51

Re: Pressure and Volume

The value of K would depend on whether pressure would change from a change in volume (would change) or addition of an inert gas (no change) based on how concentration would change.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:50 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: ICE table
Replies: 7
Views: 405

Re: ICE table

Set up and ICE table with initial, change, and equilibrium and use x to represent an unknown change.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:49 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 7
Views: 130

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

Le Chatlier's Principle states that if a system is disturbed, it will counteract the disturbance.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:46 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.13
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: 5I.13

Kc uses concentration while K uses partial pressure.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:44 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Why Q would be greater than K
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Why Q would be greater than K

Q would be greater than K if there are too many products. An external change could cause the system to have Q greater than K.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 08, 2019 2:52 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted vs Conjugate
Replies: 3
Views: 121

Re: Bronsted vs Conjugate

Bronsted can accept or donate protons. Conjugate Avis is the conjugate of a base.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 08, 2019 2:51 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: Polyproptic Acids/Bases
Replies: 4
Views: 116

Re: Polyproptic Acids/Bases

They would have multiple H or OH.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 08, 2019 2:50 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: salt solutions
Replies: 6
Views: 112

Re: salt solutions

You need to know whether they are neutral, acidic, or basic.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 08, 2019 2:49 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: b12?
Replies: 3
Views: 142

Re: b12?

Cobalt is the coordinating metal in the middle.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 08, 2019 2:49 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: pH sig figs
Replies: 9
Views: 220

Re: pH sig figs

The number of dog figs starts after the decimal place for pH. So, if there are two dig figs you would use 2.46.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:02 am
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: strong or weak base?
Replies: 13
Views: 164

Re: strong or weak base?

A strong base completely dissociates in water and there are only a few. A weak base does not completely dissociate in water.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 01, 2019 3:00 am
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Product of Acid and Base
Replies: 5
Views: 70

Re: Product of Acid and Base

The reaction between an acid and base is a neutralization reaction. The products of this reaction are a salt and water.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:58 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted Acid and base
Replies: 8
Views: 89

Re: Bronsted Acid and base

A bronsted acid donates protons while a bronsted base accepts protons.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:56 am
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 12
Views: 558

Re: Sigma and Pi Bonds

A triple bond would have 1 sigma bond and 2 pi bonds.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:54 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Shape
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: Shape

The shape of a coordination compound that has 3 ligands is trigonal planar.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:06 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent vs linear
Replies: 56
Views: 1057

Re: Bent vs linear

Bent has lone pairs while linear does not.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:06 am
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding and Dispersion
Replies: 5
Views: 153

Re: Hydrogen Bonding and Dispersion

Dispersion occurs between two nonpolar atoms/molecules. Hydrogen bonding occurs when an H is bonded to a highly electronegative atom.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:05 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: Sigma and Pi Bonds

Sigma bond is the first bond that is formed and it the overlapping of two orbitals. Pi bonds are all the remaining bonds and they are formed by side by side orbitals.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:04 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Are terminal atoms hybridized?
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: Are terminal atoms hybridized?

Each atom is hybridized based on the number of electron domains it has.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 25, 2019 1:04 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Transition Metals
Replies: 7
Views: 82

Re: Transition Metals

Yes, all transition metals can form coordinate compounds.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:11 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Strength and Length
Replies: 18
Views: 218

Re: Strength and Length

The shorter the bond, the stronger it is.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:11 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization
Replies: 6
Views: 57

Re: Hybridization

Hybridization is when 2 or more orbitals combine. For example, if a carbon has 4 bonds, all 4 of those bonds are the same. All the electrons cannot be in the same orbital, so in order for them to be equal, the orbitals have to hybridize.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 17, 2019 11:09 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Naming the Molecular Shapes
Replies: 7
Views: 106

Re: Naming the Molecular Shapes

The molecular shape names of the electron domains have roots that you can memorize. Then, try to memorize how you remove electrons to figure out the ones where there are lone pairs.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:49 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Oxygen
Replies: 9
Views: 266

Re: Oxygen

Oxygen can have triple bonds, but it is usually most stable with two.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:48 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Trend for Polarizability
Replies: 5
Views: 147

Re: Trend for Polarizability

Larger molecules are more polarizable than smaller ones, so the general trend is decreases across the row and increases down the column. Anions are more polarizable than cations because they are larger.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:56 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Noble Gases
Replies: 20
Views: 1016

Re: Noble Gases

No, neon gases are not included in the electronegativity trend, so neon is not more electronegative than fluorine.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:56 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Size
Replies: 9
Views: 103

Re: Size

Larger size means larger bond length.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:55 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole dipole forces
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Dipole dipole forces

A dipole-dipole force occurs when both compounds naturally have dipoles (HI). Induced dipoles occur when both molecules don't have a dipoles, and the induced dipole is caused by a random shift in the electron cloud.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:54 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Water molecules and ionic substances
Replies: 5
Views: 89

Re: Water molecules and ionic substances

Hydrogen bonding and the polarity of the water molecule allow ionic substances to dissolve in water.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:53 pm
Forum: *Liquid Structure (Viscosity, Surface Tension, Liquid Crystals, Ionic Liquids)
Topic: Viscosity
Replies: 15
Views: 373

Re: Viscosity

A liquid has high viscosity when it has strong intermolecular forces so it tends to by sticky and slow-moving.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:21 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: 2D.5 - Electronegativity
Replies: 4
Views: 97

Re: 2D.5 - Electronegativity

You would have to follow the electronegativity trend. You would have to look at the electronegativity difference of O and S, not S and C. O is more electronegative than S, so there would be a greater difference between O and C compared to S and C, so CO2 would be more ionic than CS2.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:33 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent and Ionic Bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 86

Re: Covalent and Ionic Bonds

You can use the electronegativity difference between the two atoms to determine whether it has more ionic or covalent character. If the difference is greater than 1.5, it is ionic. If it is between 0.5 and 1.5, it is polar covalent. If it is less than 0.5, it is nonpolar covalent.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:28 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic Solids
Replies: 2
Views: 65

Re: Ionic Solids

In an ionic solid, there is an anion with a negative charge and a cation with a positive charge. The electrostatic attraction between the charged ions holds the solid together.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:27 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Radicals: Homework Problem #2C1
Replies: 8
Views: 94

Re: Radicals: Homework Problem #2C1

NO2- has 18 electrons. Since 18 is an even number, there aren't going to be any unpaired electrons, so it would not be a radical. NO2 on the other hand would have an unpaired electron, so it would be a radical.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Mon Nov 04, 2019 12:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: General Concept
Replies: 3
Views: 74

Re: General Concept

The dual nature of light refers to its properties as a wave and particle. Formulas like c = λv are based of light's wave-like properties. The E = hv formula treats light as quantized photons.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:30 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: C-C bond lengths
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: C-C bond lengths

There was a discrepancy in these numbers because C-C bonds have resonance. So, they are partial single/double bonds.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:29 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Valence Electrons
Replies: 16
Views: 225

Re: Valence Electrons

You look at the number of electrons in the outermost shell. This is the number of valence electrons.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:27 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Dots vs Lines in Lewis Structures
Replies: 6
Views: 79

Re: Dots vs Lines in Lewis Structures

When drawing a bond, both dots and lines are synonymous. Lines are usually clearer in depicting the bonds. Unbonded electrons are always shown as dots.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Shielding
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Electron Shielding

Electron shielding refers to the blocking of valence shell electron attraction by the nucleus due to the presence of inner-shell electrons. Penetration describes the proximity to which an electron can approach to the nucleus. The principal quantum number gives you an idea of how close the electron i...
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:09 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: 1F.3
Replies: 3
Views: 63

Re: 1F.3

You need to look at the number of protons and effective nuclear charge to determine the order.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Short Hand
Replies: 11
Views: 114

Re: Short Hand

You put the last noble gas configuration in brackets and then continue using spdf normally after that.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Baler v. Lyman Series
Replies: 10
Views: 150

Re: Baler v. Lyman Series

The Balmer series is when the electron falls to the n = 2 energy level. The Lyman series is when the electron falls to the n = 1 energy level.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:35 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Energy of photons
Replies: 4
Views: 178

Re: Energy of photons

E = hv calculates the energy of an individual photon.
E = 1/2mv^2 calculates the kinetic energy of a particle. Since photons have no mass, this equation is not applicable.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:34 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Focus 1B.25 & 27 Homework
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Focus 1B.25 & 27 Homework

The Heisenberg equation states that the product of the uncertainty in momentum times the uncertainty in position has to be greater than or equal to h/4π. This means there is a minimum number of uncertainty at all times.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:31 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Unit for Wavelength
Replies: 34
Views: 366

Re: Unit for Wavelength

The standard unit for wavelength is m, and this is the output of equations relating to light. However, nanometers (10^-9) are also a common unit of measurement.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:24 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron After Excited State
Replies: 7
Views: 104

Re: Electron After Excited State

An electron jumps to a higher energy state when it absorbs energy. It falls back to its original state when it emits that energy.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Atomic Spectra Post Module
Replies: 4
Views: 48

Re: Atomic Spectra Post Module

The energy transition from n=5 to n=1 requires more energy than the energy transition from n=4 to n=2. More energy means shorter wavelength (E=hv), so the electron going from n=5 to n=1 would emit more energy.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave Properties of Electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Wave Properties of Electrons

The wave nature of electrons affects the electron's energy levels. Electrons form standing waves and each energy level has to have a whole number of wavelengths for the standing wave to exist. So, the wave property of electrons dictates how there are fixed energy levels for each electron.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:43 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Energy Problem
Replies: 4
Views: 145

Re: Energy Problem

Use the formula E=hv. We know that h is planck's constant (6.626*10^-34 m^2kg/s) and that v is frequency (1.09 x 10^15 s-1). If we plug these into the equation, we get E = (6.626*10^-34) (1.09 x 10^15) = 7.22 x 10^-19 J. Using the minimum frequency will also give the minimum amount of energy.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:37 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Do we use molar mass ?
Replies: 8
Views: 92

Re: Do we use molar mass ?

Use the number of significant digits given to you in the problem. Make sure you round your answer at the end to avoid losing precision.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:51 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: When to round for sig figs?
Replies: 12
Views: 157

Re: When to round for sig figs?

Round at the end of your calculation so you don't loose precision.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:50 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactants or Reagents Module
Replies: 2
Views: 54

Re: Limiting Reactants or Reagents Module

I believe he wanted you to focus on the reactants for the purpose of finding the limiting reactant.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:42 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: 2.Mass Percentage and Decimal Rounding:
Replies: 10
Views: 123

Re: 2.Mass Percentage and Decimal Rounding:

I would use the same number of significant figures as what is given in the problem.
by aishwarya_atmakuri
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:38 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 196
Views: 138950

Re: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]

The best thing you can do is to review problems that focus on fundamentals. Make sure you check your answers and try to figure out what you can improve on!

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