Search found 66 matches

by 205296774
Sun Dec 08, 2019 5:45 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Respiratory Acidosis
Replies: 3
Views: 147

Re: Respiratory Acidosis

The pH of the blood is monitored by the ratio of H2CO3 and HCO3-, and when one increases or decreases too much, it affects the acidity or basicity. Respiratory acidosis occurs when one does not get enough O2 and has an accumulation of CO2, instead. This CO2 reacts with water to produce carbonic acid...
by 205296774
Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:32 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Fundamentals J.13c
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: Fundamentals J.13c

Well, O is negatively charged and therefore wants to balance with two more protons, so it accepts the H+s to make water. You can also just visually look at it and see that CaO doesn't have any H+, so it doesn't really make sense for it to give off something it doesn't have.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:27 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: SO3 acidic
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: SO3 acidic

H20 with its two lone-pairs is the electron donor so, therefore, the lewis acid. SO3 does not have any lone pairs, just 3 regions of electron density, so it gains electrons from the H20 and is, therefore, the lewis base.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:05 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Acids bases and salts
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Re: Acids bases and salts

It is the acid that reacts with water to make it more acidic and the base that reacts with the water to make it more basic. You can definitely rule out the salt because, remember, adding salt to water just makes it more salty, it does not contribute to pH. Salts are actually an equal combination of ...
by 205296774
Mon Dec 02, 2019 7:57 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Homework 6.5
Replies: 1
Views: 75

Re: Homework 6.5

If you compare their lewis dot structures, the S gained another bonding region by attaching an OH; therefore, the S gained an electron pair and is the lewis acid.

Hope this helped!
by 205296774
Mon Dec 02, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentates
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Re: Polydentates

I think that CO3 2- would actually be monodente or bidente, not tridente. This is because the structure (Trigonal Planar) doesn't allow the 3rd oxygen to reach around and bind to the transition metal. This also applies to Oxalate: the C bound to another carbon and two oxygens makes a trigonal planar...
by 205296774
Mon Dec 02, 2019 7:46 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: HW 6.13
Replies: 1
Views: 43

Re: HW 6.13

B(OH)3 has no resonance because all the bonds are the same; therefore, there are no possible other structures (no double bonds to exchange with single bonds for example). Next, below the table it indicated that the conjugate would actually be B(OH)4 so the result would be just an additional OH singl...
by 205296774
Sun Dec 01, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis vs. Bronsted
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Lewis vs. Bronsted

Lewis Acids accept electron pairs while Lewis Bases donate electron pairs. Bronsted Acids donate a proton and Bronsted Bases accept protons.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:51 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C.7 Chelaxing
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: 9C.7 Chelaxing

Chelaxing is when a polydente attaches back to a metal, forming a ring. In 9C.7, only one of the figures has close enough NH2 molecules to form a bond that will subsequently form a ring.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:00 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydente - CO3 2-
Replies: 1
Views: 64

Polydente - CO3 2-

Can someone explain why CO3 2- can be both monodente and didente? Thank you!
by 205296774
Thu Nov 28, 2019 1:57 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2.45
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: 2.45

The answer for the sigma bond between C-O is sigma( C 2sp2, O 2sp2). This is the case because both the carbon and oxygen have three regions of electron density (C - 2 single bonds and 1 double bond) (O- 2 lone pairs and 1 double bond). Pi bonds are p-orbitals overlapping (not s-orbitals) so it will ...
by 205296774
Thu Nov 28, 2019 1:50 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: sp^2 Hybridization of Carbon
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: sp^2 Hybridization of Carbon

The answer is electron-electron repulsion. There is more repulsion when two electrons share an orbital making it less favorable and unstable. Therefore, to avoid this, one of the electrons in the s-orbital jumps to fill an empty p-orbital.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:49 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: What does a cage-like molecule look like?
Replies: 1
Views: 20

Re: What does a cage-like molecule look like?

By "cage-like" I think you are referring to when the formula is encased by square brackets. If so, this just means that whatever is in the brackets is also within the coordination sphere.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Nov 20, 2019 2:39 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Identifying Induced-Dipole
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Identifying Induced-Dipole

Dipole moments occur when there is a difference in electronegativity, also known as when there is unequal sharing and a polar molecule results. If this is the case, then the molecule is OVERALL polar and interactions with itself (polar and polar) will only give rise to dipole-dipole and london and p...
by 205296774
Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:17 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Effect of lone pair on bond angles
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Effect of lone pair on bond angles

I think it is because of the atomic radii. The larger the radius, the greater the distance between bonded atoms, and therefore the longer, weaker bond. Since O and S have larger radii than N or H, I think the bond lengths would be slightly weaker and, therefore, leaving them more susceptible to dist...
by 205296774
Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:10 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole-Dipole and induced dipole
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: Dipole-Dipole and induced dipole

You should look at the OVERALL characteristic. This molecule is polar overall because of the electronegativity difference between the C and Cl. Assuming that this molecule is interacting with only itself, dipole induced-dipole is not possible because it requires a non polar molecule which ClCH3 is n...
by 205296774
Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:37 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: how to determine ion-ion
Replies: 4
Views: 58

Re: how to determine ion-ion

NaCl implies Na+ and Cl- so with would form an ion-ion interaction with itself. It would also form an ion-dipole if a polar molecule was present.

Hope this helps.
by 205296774
Mon Nov 18, 2019 8:17 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: nonpolar and polar
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: nonpolar and polar

Since the dipoles cancel, will they not interact as dipoles anymore and only form london interactions?
by 205296774
Mon Nov 18, 2019 8:16 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Determining state based on intermolecular interactions
Replies: 1
Views: 54

Determining state based on intermolecular interactions

I came across a question that asked which specific molecule would be in the liquid state at room temperature. Is there a specific interaction that guarantees a liquid state at room temperature? How would one distinguish and answer this question?

Thank you!
by 205296774
Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dipole-Dipole Forces
Replies: 3
Views: 103

Re: Dipole-Dipole Forces

The separation of the partial charges creates a dipole where one pole is partially negative and the other is partially positive. I think you are either referring to the overall charge being zero as the two opposite partial charges cancel, or most likely, when two polar molecules (which therefore eac...
by 205296774
Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:10 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Midterm 2019 Question 3A
Replies: 2
Views: 150

Re: Midterm 2019 Question 3A

I think that the solutions manual has an error. Our constants and equation sheet says 9.109 X 10^-31 kg and I used this value on my exam and received full credit.
by 205296774
Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:06 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Boiling Point
Replies: 6
Views: 80

Re: Boiling Point

The rankings for intermolecular forces are as follows: london dispersion < dipole-dipole < H-bond < ionic bond It can therefore be determined that ionic bonds will have the highest boiling point because, as the strongest bonds, they require the greatest amount of energy (heat in this case) to be bro...
by 205296774
Wed Nov 13, 2019 4:00 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole-Dipole Moments
Replies: 3
Views: 67

Re: Dipole-Dipole Moments

Yes, the dipole-dipole moment is dependent on the difference in electronegativity and the ability to be polarized. Atoms with a high electronegativity and therefore smaller radius have a stronger polarizing power to distort something else with a larger radius and lower electronegativity. (The electr...
by 205296774
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:51 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Week 9 homework
Replies: 11
Views: 178

Re: Week 9 homework

I think homework will still be due regardless but will probably be accepted at a later date.

You should ask your TA, though.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Nov 13, 2019 2:49 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Midterm grade
Replies: 4
Views: 81

Re: Midterm grade

It should be uploaded on CCLE eventually, just like the homework and first test. I think it is just delayed considering the volume each TA has to grade, check, and input.

Hope this helps
by 205296774
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:30 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 2
Views: 106

Re: Midterm

I'm not sure if acids and bases are on it, but I would just know what we went over in class: acids are acceptors of electrons to fill their octets and bases are doners that "donate" electrons for sharing. Also that this new class of reactions (Lewis Acid-Bases reactions) creates a new bond...
by 205296774
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:23 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge Cancellation
Replies: 3
Views: 77

Re: Formal Charge Cancellation

Sometimes, because of the octet rule or combination of atoms, it isn't possible for each atom to have a formal charge of zero, but if the overall formal charge is zero then make sure that the charges on the atoms sum to the overall charge. For example, if one atom as a plus 1 and another has a minus...
by 205296774
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:18 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: 1A.11
Replies: 3
Views: 166

Re: 1A.11

The lines each belong to respective energy levels which are quantized or discrete values. For example, the Lyman series classifies lines to n=1, Balmer series to n=2, and Paschen to n=3 which are all the lower energy level involved in the transition of an electron.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:14 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 1E.5
Replies: 1
Views: 125

Re: 1E.5

a. false, effective nuclear charge is dependent on the number of electrons because electrons in lower energy levels (s for example) will shield electrons in higher energy levels from the nuclear charge. b. true, the closer the electron is to the nucleus (and therefore the lower energy level) the mor...
by 205296774
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:07 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond strengths
Replies: 9
Views: 90

Re: Bond strengths

No, assumed that if the bond is longer, then it is also weaker.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Mon Nov 04, 2019 9:38 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Resonance

Pretty much, but not just those with a formal charge of zero. For example, you could be asked to make a structure for something that has a formal charge of plus 1 or minus 2 depending on what is given; therefore, your results would not have a FC of zero. You are mostly right, though, resonance struc...
by 205296774
Sat Nov 02, 2019 11:09 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Calculator Issues!
Replies: 3
Views: 55

Re: Calculator Issues!

I am having the same problems! I think it has to do with plugging in scientific notation and may be able to be solved with parentheses, but I'm still trying to figure it out, too!

Hopefully someone else has a concrete solution.
by 205296774
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:03 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Which equations can you only use for light?
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: Which equations can you only use for light?

Yes, you only use these for light because they are only measuring properties (wavelength and frequency) unique to light.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:08 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet confusion
Replies: 2
Views: 41

Octet confusion

So, I understand how octets work with the s and p orbital but how do they work with the d orbital since there is a total of 10 electrons? I know that having a full d-orbital is desirable because it is stable, but would that leave 2 electrons in the valence shell since the previous shell would be fil...
by 205296774
Wed Oct 30, 2019 2:58 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Faster way to write resonance structures?
Replies: 2
Views: 45

Re: Faster way to write resonance structures?

Dr. Lavelle showed us a short-hand that researchers or scientists use as an example (it was a hexagon with a circle inside of it implying that hydrogens are at the corners), but I would say to just do the normal notation as that is the format for correct test responses.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Tue Oct 29, 2019 9:47 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: HW 2A19
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Re: HW 2A19

Ni 2+ would have an electron confirmation of [Ar] 3d^10 that changes to [Ar] 3d^8 so after first adding one electron to each orbital (5), you follow by adding 3 additional electrons to completely fill 3 out of the 5 orbitals, leaving 2 electrons alone or unpaired in their orbitals.
by 205296774
Tue Oct 29, 2019 9:41 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: HW 2A.5
Replies: 2
Views: 45

Re: HW 2A.5

My TA explained it like this: Always write out the complete ground state, then move backwards subtracting electrons from right to left. So for this one, begin with [Ar]3d^10 4s^2 4p^1. Then, move from right to left, taking away the 4p and 4s orbitals to get a positive charge of 3. Technically, becau...
by 205296774
Mon Oct 28, 2019 10:33 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: grading
Replies: 5
Views: 83

Re: grading

Yes, for this class all grades will be posted in myucla, but many others post grades in CCLE. Just go to the left column tab and scroll down until you see "grades."
by 205296774
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:03 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Electron Affinity

Electron affinity is the likelihood of a neutral atom to gain an electron, making it an anion. Lithium, needing 1 more electron to complete the 2s orbital, has a high electron affinity because it really wants that extra electron to stabilize. Beryllium, on the other hand, has a full 1s and 2s orbita...
by 205296774
Tue Oct 22, 2019 9:17 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 1E.23
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: 1E.23

Ga: [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p1 - 1 unpaired electron
Ge: [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p2 - 2 unpaired electrons
As: [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p3 - 3 unpaired electrons
Se: [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p4 - 2 unpaired electrons
Br: [Ar] 3d10 4s2 4p5 - 1 unpaired electron

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Mon Oct 21, 2019 9:34 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Isotopes
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: Isotopes

Yes, that is correct!
by 205296774
Mon Oct 21, 2019 9:23 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Week 4 homework problems
Replies: 5
Views: 64

Re: Week 4 homework problems

Our homework and units aren't broken up by week. The quantum unit is multiple weeks long so the page with the key concepts and hw problems apply to this week, too.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Mon Oct 21, 2019 2:42 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Nodal Plane Significance
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Nodal Plane Significance

I would say that it's just important to know what nodal planes generally are since they do relate to Schrodinger's equation, but maybe ask your TA if a more in-depth understanding is required. Overall, I'd say that the level in which Dr. Lavelle covers topics in lecture is a good representation of w...
by 205296774
Mon Oct 21, 2019 2:37 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Week 4 Homework
Replies: 3
Views: 66

Re: Week 4 Homework

Yes, the Quantum unit is longer than one week, so all the problems, important concepts, and modules are applicable to this week as well.
by 205296774
Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:44 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: The units for each equation we're using?
Replies: 4
Views: 85

Re: The units for each equation we're using?

I would also really appreciate someone listing out the units. If it's possible, could whoever answers this also distinguish the units for each variable as well as the equation overall? Thank you!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:41 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 91

Re: Orbitals

I agree with what's above! You can also do it the long way if you can't remember l's relationship to s, p, d, or f l=0: 0 (one value) 1-orbital l=2: 2, 1, 0, -1, -2 (five values) 5-orbitals l=1: 1, 0, -1 (three values) 3-orbitals l=3: 3, 2, 1, 0, -1, -2, -3 (seven values) 7-orbitals Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:34 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Uncertainty application
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Re: Uncertainty application

Photons, being light, do not have mass so you will never be able to use the momentum equation. With that said, I think it is safe to say that you can't calculate the uncertainty. I went to a drop-in session today, and the UA confirmed this specific point as well.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:32 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Quantum Numbers
Replies: 2
Views: 49

Re: Quantum Numbers

Yeah, I agree with the above response. Additionally, just know the general rules on how n relates to l and to Ml.

For example,

l = 0,1,2, ... n-l
Ml = l, l-1, ... -l

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 16, 2019 4:40 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Equations for Quantum Topics
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Equations for Quantum Topics

I have all that plus the Quantum numbers and Atomic orbitals we went over today: Principle Quantum # (n) - determines energy and size Angular Quantum # (l) - describes shape Magnetic Quantum # (Ml) - labels different orbitals of a sub-shell and then the Spin Magnetic Quantum # (Ms = +1/2 -1/2) Remem...
by 205296774
Wed Oct 16, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Magnetic Quantum
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: Magnetic Quantum

I don't think so. Today in lecture, Dr.Lavelle said that it did not matter.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: How Many Sig Figs
Replies: 7
Views: 284

Re: How Many Sig Figs

For addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, the sig figs in the result should match the smallest amount of sig figs in the data or problem. For logs and exponentials, there should be the same number of sig figs in the problem and the result.

Hope this helps!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW 1B.5
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: HW 1B.5

(140.511 x 10^3 eV ) x ( 1.6022 x 10 ^-19 J/eV) = 2.2513 X 10^-14 J

Here you go!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:29 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW Question #1A.15
Replies: 6
Views: 66

Re: HW Question #1A.15

During the specific experiment with the hydrogen atom, Lyman detected the ultraviolet rays which occurred when an electron went from below n=1 to n=1 so they were therefore called the "Lyman series" and it's just a name to remember. You would be told that the electron is going from n= some...
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:19 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Constants in the Quantum World
Replies: 6
Views: 78

Re: Constants in the Quantum World

Sure! I think we only need to know these (on a test, they will be provided) -
Plank's Constant: h=6.62608 x 10^-34 J.s
Rydberg Constant: R=3.28984 x 10^15 Hz
Speed of Light: c=2.99792 x 10^8 m.s-1
Mass of electron: me=9.109383 x 10^-31 kg
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 8:08 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photoelectric Effect
Replies: 3
Views: 76

Re: Photoelectric Effect

Sure, so the photoelectric effect resulted from the photoelectric experiment: light was shone onto a metal surface to measure the energy need to remove electrons from different metals. The surprising discovery was that light wasn't acting like a wave but rather a photon; therefore, light should be c...
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:55 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Atomic Spectra
Replies: 7
Views: 96

Re: Atomic Spectra

Yeah, that's correct. Also, In my notes, I specifically have that UV results from n=1 (biggest gap) and then visible light from n=2 and infrared from n=3.
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 7:51 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Difference between Photoelectric effect and the atomic spectra
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Re: Difference between Photoelectric effect and the atomic spectra

Ok! Thank you, this helps clarify the two a lot!
by 205296774
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Difference between Photoelectric effect and the atomic spectra
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Difference between Photoelectric effect and the atomic spectra

Hi there. During the Monday lecture, after going over the photoelectric effect, Dr. Lavelle mentioned that many students make the mistake of getting this topic confused with the atomic spectra. Could anyone further clarify it for me? I get the general gist but don't want to get them confused!

Thanks!
by 205296774
Tue Oct 08, 2019 2:43 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Post Video Assessment
Replies: 3
Views: 109

Re: Photoelectric Effect Post Video Assessment

Yup, the above reply is correct. You used the wavelength as the photon energy instead of first converting it with c=wavelength x v and E= vh equations. I find it easiest to organize what I know based on looking at the units, so maybe try that in the future to keep everything sorted.
by 205296774
Sun Oct 06, 2019 4:49 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: avogadro's number
Replies: 4
Views: 88

Re: avogadro's number

You also can use it when you're trying to find how many "things" there are when provided moles or vice versa. For example, if you're given the moles of oxygen and want to find the atoms (ie "things") or if you have a number of H20 moles you can find the molecules (ie "things...
by 205296774
Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:36 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Solving for remaining moles of the excess (M5)
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Re: Solving for remaining moles of the excess (M5)

Sure! First look at the moles given: 12 mol ClO2 and 5 mol BrF3. Taking into account the ratio of 1 to 2 that we used to figure out which reactant was limiting, we apply that to the reactants to see how it compares to the moles given to complete this reaction. Multiplying 6 mol ClO2 by 2 gets us 12 ...
by 205296774
Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:22 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Formula Units
Replies: 6
Views: 114

Re: Formula Units

Sure! Formula units are just a type of particle associated with ionic compounds so you only use the term formula units when the problem relates to an ionic compound. Other "particles" are atoms and molecules but those are associated with elements and molecular compounds, respectively. Basi...
by 205296774
Mon Sep 30, 2019 8:31 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity Audio-Visual Focus-Topics Question 23
Replies: 3
Views: 79

Re: Molarity Audio-Visual Focus-Topics Question 23

Sure! Here is the break down of solving: So first, let's write out the applicable formulas: g= mol x gmol-1, M= n/V, and Minitial x Vinitial = Mfinal X Vfinal We know that there are 5 grams of KMnO4 and that we have a volume of 150mL but we really need the molarity (M= n/V) and to do this, we first ...
by 205296774
Mon Sep 30, 2019 8:03 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Homework Problem E.9c
Replies: 5
Views: 88

Re: Homework Problem E.9c

Sure! So to find the moles of H2O you follow the equation (g = mol X gmol-1 ) and divide 5.15g by the molar mass of MgSO4 x 7H20 which is 246.48 gmol-1. After this, you multiply the result (.02089 mol) by 7 because you want just one mole of water but you calculated the moles for 7. To accommodate th...
by 205296774
Mon Sep 30, 2019 7:47 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: 5 Homework Problems Due
Replies: 21
Views: 324

Re: 5 Homework Problems Due

I believe you only have to do 5 total; although, it is a good idea to get more practice.:)

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