Search found 59 matches

by AVerma_F19
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:50 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Line Structures
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: Line Structures

generally carbon will always have 4 bonds in an organic compound, nitrogen will have 3+ a lone pair or 4. Oxygen would have a double bond and 2 lone pairs unless a hydrogen is drawn
by AVerma_F19
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:47 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: hydrogen
Replies: 2
Views: 122

Re: hydrogen

The hydrogen in question must be bound to a Nitrogen, Oxygen or Fluorine. This is so that the electron density is almost completely pulled away from the hydrogen, essentially having it become an exposed proton that can bind to any lone pairs. The lone pairs, however, can come from any atom (typicall...
by AVerma_F19
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:45 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating vs Polydentate Ligands
Replies: 3
Views: 89

Re: Chelating vs Polydentate Ligands

A chelating ligand is one that binds to a cation in more than one location, thus it is polydentate.

Some of the common polydentate ligands are

oxalate (bidentate)
ethylenediamine (bidentate)
diethylenetriamine (tridentate)
ethylenediaminetriacetate (EDTA - hexadentate)
porphyrin (tetradentate)
by AVerma_F19
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:43 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Metals
Replies: 6
Views: 53

Re: Metals

I'd know the common ones for the anion coordination compound naming:

iron (ferrate)
copper (cuprate)
chromium (chromate)
silver(argenate)
gold (aurate)
by AVerma_F19
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:49 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Homework Problem J. 17
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Homework Problem J. 17

K+ does not influence pH since it is the conjugate base of a strong base (it is highly stable and doesn't need to take a proton).

By process of elimination, ClO- is the conjugate acid of a weak base. Thus, it is able to accept a proton.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:43 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: cations and anions with naming
Replies: 1
Views: 34

Re: cations and anions with naming

The second name you said, potassium tetracyanonickelate (II) is the correct naming.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Dec 03, 2019 3:18 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Textbook 9C.9
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Textbook 9C.9

For (c), en is bidentate (since it forms a ring and connects to the cation 2 times. Since there are 2 en's, the en's contribute a total of 4 bonds to the TM cation. Then, the 2 chlorides provide 2 bonds that bring the coordination number to 6. For (d), if you look at the structure of EDTA, it has 2 ...
by AVerma_F19
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Define Acid and Base
Replies: 7
Views: 84

Re: Define Acid and Base

A lewis acid is an electron pair acceptor. A lewis base is an electron pair donor. A bronsted acid is a proton donor. A bronsted base is a proton acceptor. SO4 does not form H2SO4 in water; however, H2SO4 dissolved in water is a strong acid.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: transition metal is acid?
Replies: 2
Views: 27

Re: transition metal is acid?

I believe that transition metals are a Lewis Acid, but not a Bronsted acid.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:31 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bases & Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Bases & Coordinate Covalent Bonds

The H2O acts as a weak acid, since it is a proton donor. It's a coordinate covalent bond since both electrons are provided by the O2-.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:28 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: What is kA value?
Replies: 5
Views: 71

Re: What is kA value?

It basically gives you the ratio between the (product of the concentration of each of the products)/(product of the concentration of each of the reactants). Using this, you can calculate the concentration of the reactants or products using the kA given.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:40 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong Acids/Bases
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Strong Acids/Bases

They are able to protonate/de-protonate biological molecules like DNA, proteins, enzymes, etc. which many times inactivates their function. Additionally, many biological systems are pH sensitive, meaning that proteins will fold differently/act differently under different pHs.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:37 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization & Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: Hybridization & Sigma and Pi Bonds

Pi bonds do not affect hybridization. They are generally p orbitals that have not hybridized that are overlapping side by side.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Nov 19, 2019 7:38 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: boiling point
Replies: 6
Views: 211

Re: boiling point

I believe that since Iodine is larger than the Bromine, the induced-dipole/induced-dipole forces would cause the IMFs in the HI to be stronger than those in the HBr molecules.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Nov 19, 2019 6:12 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of H2
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: Hybridization of H2

There is no need for the orbitals to hybridize since they each have 2 unpaired electrons in the s orbital. Hybridization is observed when there are more sigma bonds than the number of unpaired valence electrons in the ground state of the central atom.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Nov 19, 2019 6:10 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Hm. 2e15?
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Hm. 2e15?

So, because different atoms have different sizes, the angle is never truly/exactly 109.5 degrees unless all 4 atoms surrounding the central atom are the same. However, this phenomenon has a much smaller impact on bond angles than the presence of a lone pair, since lone pairs are untethered at one en...
by AVerma_F19
Mon Nov 18, 2019 7:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar and Nonpolar Question [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 992

Re: Polar and Nonpolar Question [ENDORSED]

You cannot, since the C-H and the C-Cl bonds are NOT equally polar. Additionally, this molecule is tetrahedral, so unless all 4 bonds are of the same polarity, the dipole moments don't cancel out.
by AVerma_F19
Mon Nov 18, 2019 6:42 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 2
Views: 122

Re: Polarizability

Molecules/atoms that are bigger have more electrons, which means that the induced-dipole/induced-dipole forces would be stronger since the electron cloud can be more distorted, which creates a stronger partial charge.
by AVerma_F19
Mon Nov 18, 2019 6:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Sigma and Pi Bonds

I think that is exactly the kind of question that we would be asked on a test.
by AVerma_F19
Mon Nov 18, 2019 6:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond angles
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: Bond angles

It would just be linear.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:19 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 2F.3 Help
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: 2F.3 Help

We haven't learned this yet in class; however, it refers to sp hybridization. Typically, a single bond is an s bond. A double bond requires the contribution of the s and p orbitals. A triple bond requires the contribution of 1 s orbital and 2 p orbitals.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:18 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen bonding
Replies: 7
Views: 48

Re: Hydrogen bonding

They are very strong intermolecular forces that give molecules like H2O special properties.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:05 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Antioxidants
Replies: 9
Views: 267

Re: Antioxidants

Antioxidants are able to give a single e- to a free radical without becoming destabilized themselves.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:35 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electronegativity
Replies: 9
Views: 244

Re: Electronegativity

Yes it does. They both refer to similar properties about an atom's electron-nucleus relationship.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:32 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: High Distortion
Replies: 4
Views: 71

Re: High Distortion

In a perfectly covalent bond, the electrons are perfectly shared between the two atoms. However, this is never the case unless the two atoms are the same, since there will be differing electronegativities between two different element's atoms. When an atom is more electronegative than the other, it ...
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:30 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Re: Polarity

Yes, you would likely have to draw/imagine the shape of a molecule and consider the dipole moments within it. For example, CH4 is symmetrical, so the dipole moments between C-H bonds cancel. However, H2O is not, and this can be seen by the strong dipoles in H-O bonds.
by AVerma_F19
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:29 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond strength
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: Bond strength

Yes this is correct.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Nov 06, 2019 4:01 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Octet
Replies: 10
Views: 116

Re: Expanded Octet

It's because elements in Period 3 and higher have available space in the d shell to accommodate more electrons.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Nov 06, 2019 3:53 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Xenon and Expanded Octets
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Re: Xenon and Expanded Octets

The FC charge equation gives a FC of 0 when you look at these structures. FC = # of valence e - (# of lone pair e + # of bonding/2)
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 30, 2019 3:38 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity trends
Replies: 5
Views: 60

Re: Electronegativity trends

I think we just need to know the general properties of all the trends.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 30, 2019 2:23 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Bonds:
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Re: Bonds:

a bond is 2 electrons.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Oct 29, 2019 6:19 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave vs. Particle Model
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Wave vs. Particle Model

I imagine there would be an experimental set up where we were to determine how an electron/photon will act in a certain situation as a wave/particle. Or, we could be asked to use one of the equations (De Broglie, etc) to calculate energy of a particle.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Oct 29, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Dipole vs ionic bond
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Dipole vs ionic bond

I believe you're right, since the partial charges are from covalent bonds and formal charges from elements within the compound.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Oct 29, 2019 4:13 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Exceptions to the Octet Rule Question
Replies: 3
Views: 59

Re: Exceptions to the Octet Rule Question

I believe that they generally do. To have an FC of 0, they need an expanded octet.
by AVerma_F19
Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:41 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Question about speed uncertainty
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: Question about speed uncertainty

Firstly, the position uncertainty that you would enter into your calculation would be 10 meters. Since the car has such a large mass, and since the speed uncertainty is on the order of 10^-39, this calculation is unhelpful since we can measure the speed of the car quite accurately. This calculation ...
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 23, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: E- removal
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: E- removal

The first and second electron have an energetic relationship, meaning that there is some e-/e- repulsion between the 2. When the first is removed, that repulsive force disappears, leaving the second electron more tightly bound to the nucleus. Additionally, since the nucleus has less electrons to hol...
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 23, 2019 3:36 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Ion
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Ion

I believe the ground state of an ion is essentially the element in its normal electron configuration (without charge or excited electrons).
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 23, 2019 3:27 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Oribital Notation
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Re: Oribital Notation

You should write it from lowest to highest energy.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 23, 2019 3:10 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Trend in periodic table
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: Trend in periodic table

Yes you are correct. And going down the table means that you get more energy levels.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 23, 2019 3:01 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: octet rule
Replies: 6
Views: 114

Re: octet rule

Yes, he hasn't covered this yet but some of the elements in Periods 3 and down can have something called an expanded octet. I think he will go over this on Friday.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 23, 2019 2:52 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Diffraction Patterns for Electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Diffraction Patterns for Electrons

Yes, they do. They have a small enough mass where theycan exhibit wave like properties via the De Broglie equation.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 16, 2019 8:17 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: General question 1B.27
Replies: 4
Views: 72

Re: General question 1B.27

Δp = m Δv is the equation to relate Δv to Δp. I believe that the Δ accounts for +/-.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:03 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: how to express answer
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: how to express answer

In class, Prof. Lavelle used a best-case scenario and maintained an "=" in his subsequent calculations; however, I don't believe it would be wrong to include the ">"
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:01 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Schrodinger's Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: Schrodinger's Equation

Schrodinger's equation is taught to us to demonstrate how we "define" electrons. Because of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, we can never truly know where an electron is, and Schrodinger's equation materializes the properties of electrons as the solutions to the equation.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 16, 2019 1:10 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Week 3 HW Help
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: Week 3 HW Help

I believe that there is a set number of orbitals based on the subshell. s has 1 orbital, p has 3, d has 5 and f has 7. Each orbital holds 2 electrons, with an opposite spin.
by AVerma_F19
Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:25 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Schrondiger's Wave Function Equation
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: Schrondiger's Wave Function Equation

Psi^2 represents something called a probability density. Probability density is DIFFERENT from probability in that probability density has a unit (volume^-1). When you take psi^2, you can multiply it by the volume in question (for example: the volume of an atom) to get the probability of finding the...
by AVerma_F19
Mon Oct 14, 2019 3:46 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: frequency and speed
Replies: 7
Views: 109

Re: frequency and speed

Using the equation you mentioned (KE(electron) = E(photon)-Threshold Energy), the speed of the photon is not in question. Photons (and all radiation) will travel at 3*10^8 m/s. However, depending on how much energy the photon has, the KE of the electron (not radiation) will change via velocity (sinc...
by AVerma_F19
Mon Oct 14, 2019 3:21 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: frequency and speed
Replies: 7
Views: 109

Re: frequency and speed

The speed of radiation does not decrease with increased frequency. c = Frequency*Wavelength, where c is the speed of light (3*10^8m/s). Since c is constant, frequency and wavelength are inversely proportional. This means that if frequency goes up, wavelength will go down, and vice versa.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 09, 2019 4:02 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Atomic Spectra
Replies: 5
Views: 59

Atomic Spectra

Do the emission and absorption spectra of atoms always correspond?
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:58 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy
Replies: 6
Views: 86

Re: Energy

Think of the energy levels like hitting a golf ball into the hole. If you hit the ball too lightly, it won't go into the hole. If you hit the ball too hard, it again won't go into the hole. If you miss, you have to bring the golf ball back to try and hit it again. Similarly, an electron will only mo...
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:52 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: E=hv
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: E=hv

Using this equation, the energy you get is the energy of 1 particle - whether it be a photon or electron. Therefore, if you wanted to find the amount of energy to remove 1 mole of electrons, you would need to calculate the energy needed for the removal of 1 electron, and then multiply by avagadros n...
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:49 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy Levels
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Re: Energy Levels

I believe that 1 photon is always released per energy change. This can be observed by the fact that light of just ONE frequency can cause an electron to jump 2 energy levels.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:43 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: wave/particle properties of mass
Replies: 3
Views: 54

Re: wave/particle properties of mass

I think that photons are considered massless packets of energy, so I'm not sure whether the same rules would apply.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:26 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: E21b. Sig Figs
Replies: 5
Views: 133

Re: E21b. Sig Figs

I agree with the above answers; it must have something to do with the molar mass calculations.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:23 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: M.9
Replies: 5
Views: 141

Re: M.9

The net ionic reaction essentially means that you only include atoms/molecules that do NOT remain in an aqueous state after the reaction has completed.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:21 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: G7)
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: G7)

Exactly, since H2O and the compound are the only two molecules present in the solution.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:20 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: HW problem F9
Replies: 8
Views: 133

Re: HW problem F9

I believe these would be the lowest whole number ratios that you get--essentially the empirical formula.
by AVerma_F19
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: 5 Homework Problems Due
Replies: 21
Views: 311

Re: 5 Homework Problems Due

Technically, you would only need to do 5 problems by this Friday; however, I did many more to prepare myself for the tests, etc.

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