Search found 72 matches

by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Tue Feb 11, 2020 2:41 pm
Forum: Calculating Standard Reaction Entropies (e.g. , Using Standard Molar Entropies)
Topic: 4H.1
Replies: 1
Views: 11

4H.1

In problem 4H.1: which substance in each of the following pairs has the higher molar entropy at 298K a) HBr or HF (gases) b)NH3 or Ne (gases) c) I2 (s) or I2 (l) d)1.0 mol Ar (g) at 1.00 atm vs at 2.00 atm, can anyone explain the difference in entropy for each part and why one is greater than the ot...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Feb 08, 2020 2:40 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 4A.7
Replies: 3
Views: 26

4A.7

How do you solve problem 4A.7: Calculate the heat that must be supplied to a copper kettle of mass 400 g containing 300 g of water to raise its temperature from 20 degrees to the boiling point, 100 degrees. What percentage of heat is used to raise the temperature of the water?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Feb 08, 2020 2:38 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 4A.3 part c
Replies: 3
Views: 18

4A.3 part c

How do you determine the change in internal energy in 4A.3 part c? Why does delta U not = w in this case?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Wed Feb 05, 2020 9:41 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Heat capacity
Replies: 4
Views: 20

Heat capacity

How do you know the value of C at constant pressure and constant volume? What is C for an ideal gas?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Tue Feb 04, 2020 4:28 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: 4B.13 part a
Replies: 1
Views: 14

4B.13 part a

How do you solve part a of 4B.13, where the gas sample is expanding against a constant pressure of 1.00 atm?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Mon Feb 03, 2020 10:17 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Heat capacity
Replies: 3
Views: 13

Heat capacity

Conceptually, what does heat capacity mean and how does constant volume heat capacity differ from constant pressure heat capacity?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 4:26 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard States
Replies: 2
Views: 8

Standard States

What does it mean for reactants/products to be in their standard states?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 3:59 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible Processes
Replies: 3
Views: 11

Reversible Processes

In the expansion of a gas, how do you know if the process is reversible or not?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:23 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Closed Systems
Replies: 8
Views: 25

Closed Systems

How do closed systems exchange energy with the environment but isolated systems do not?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Feb 01, 2020 5:21 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Pressure in an open beaker
Replies: 12
Views: 42

Pressure in an open beaker

In an open beaker system, how do we know that the system is at constant pressure?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:59 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6E.1
Replies: 1
Views: 19

6E.1

How do you calculate the pH of 0.15 M H2SO4?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Wed Jan 22, 2020 3:54 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6D. 15 part b
Replies: 1
Views: 26

6D. 15 part b

In problem 6D.15 part b, how do you find the pH of 0.055 M AlCl3?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:56 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Weak acids & bases
Replies: 7
Views: 23

Weak acids & bases

How do you calculate the % protonated of a weak acid/base?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:50 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Buffers
Replies: 3
Views: 10

Buffers

What is a buffer and how is it made?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:49 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 7
Views: 20

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

Le Chatelier's principle predicts what will happen to a system if it is exposed to change- in pressure, volume, concentration of reactants/products, heat...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:39 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: K less than 10^-3
Replies: 5
Views: 15

K less than 10^-3

What assumption do we make if K < 10^-3 and why does this make the change in the concentrations negligible?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:36 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Pressure & Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 6
Views: 14

Pressure & Le Chatelier's Principle

How does changing the pressure of a system affect equilibrium?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:02 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: when to use Kc vs Kp
Replies: 11
Views: 35

Re: when to use Kc vs Kp

The brackets indicate that the number inside is a concentration (molarity). Parentheses mean that the number is a partial pressure of a gas.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:58 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Using the "ICE" box
Replies: 8
Views: 55

Re: Using the "ICE" box

Solids and liquids are also omitted from ICE box calculations because a negligible amount of the pure substances is used in the reaction. Solids and liquids don't have concentrations and are not included in the K expression or the ICE box.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:45 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Concentration and partial pressure
Replies: 2
Views: 8

Concentration and partial pressure

How is the concentration of a gas related to its partial pressure, and when given an equilibrium expression should we assume we're given the concentration or partial pressure?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:40 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G.9
Replies: 1
Views: 15

5G.9

In problem 5G.9 part c, why is the ratio of partial pressure O2/partial pressure of O3 different for the two experiments?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:31 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 5
Views: 15

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

No, solids and liquids are present in a constant amount throughout the reaction so adding or removing some solid/liquid will not affect the reaction.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 6:40 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: 6C.17
Replies: 2
Views: 27

6C.17

In problem 6C.17 from the textbook, it asks "which is the stronger base, the hypobromite ion BrO- or morphine C17H19O3N." Why is the hypobromite ion the stronger base?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:25 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentates and Chelates
Replies: 4
Views: 24

Re: Polydentates and Chelates

Yes, all polydentate ligands bind to the central atom at multiple sites and can form a loop/ring which includes the central atom.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:22 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Acid Rain & Solutions
Replies: 4
Views: 66

Acid Rain & Solutions

Why does rain become acidic and what are some solutions to lessening the acidity?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:26 am
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Anion Stability & Acid Strength
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Anion Stability & Acid Strength

How does the stability of the resulting anion change as you go down a group or across a period in the periodic table?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Fri Dec 06, 2019 2:30 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization from Atomic Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 12

Hybridization from Atomic Orbitals

From a conceptual standpoint, how does hybridization arise from atomic orbitals?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:45 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: J.9
Replies: 2
Views: 15

Re: J.9

We can assume strong acids/bases will completely dissociate in water, whereas very few ions will be found in a weak acids/base solution.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:40 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Weak acids & pH
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Weak acids & pH

How does the solvent play a role in the pH of a weak acid solution?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: Oxoacids Trends
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Oxoacids Trends

Why does the strength of the acid increase for an oxoacid when the oxidation number of the central atom increases?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:23 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Ka & Entropy
Replies: 1
Views: 19

Ka & Entropy

How does the Ka/Kb value depend on entropy and enthalpy?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:17 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bases & Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Bases & Coordinate Covalent Bonds

When an O2- ion in solution takes a proton from a water molecule, does the H2O molecule act as a strong or weak acid? Why is the bond between the proton and lone pair of electrons on O2- a coordinate covalent bond?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:46 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Bronsted vs. Lewis Acids
Replies: 9
Views: 43

Bronsted vs. Lewis Acids

What is the difference between the Bronsted and Lewis definitions of acids/bases and which definition includes more acids?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:42 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Compounds
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: Coordination Compounds

Coordination compounds have a central atom/ion bonded by coordinate covalent bonds to other molecules/ions.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:31 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Polydentate Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Polydentate Ligands

What does it mean for a ligand to be polydentate? What would it look like and how would it affect the shape/naming of the compound?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:27 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxidation states
Replies: 6
Views: 35

Oxidation states

How are oxidation states determined in coordination complexes?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 10:53 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization Notation
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: Hybridization Notation

Yes, sp^3d would be the correct notation.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:44 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Determining if a molecule is polar or non polar
Replies: 9
Views: 51

Re: Determining if a molecule is polar or non polar

We don't have to determine polarity of the molecule using exact electronegativity values. We can determine if a bond is polar/nonpolar using trends from the periodic table. If polar bonds cause dipoles and don't cancel out in a molecule, it will be polar. If the dipoles do cancel out, the molecule w...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:33 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Lone pairs

Why do lone pairs of electrons occupy a greater amount of space (and cause more repulsion) than bonded electron pairs?
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:31 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Notation
Replies: 5
Views: 37

Re: VSEPR Notation

A is the central atom, X's subscript refers to the number of bonding electron pairs around the central atom, and E's subscript refers to the number of lone electron pairs on the central atom.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:29 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Symmetry and Polarity
Replies: 13
Views: 73

Re: Symmetry and Polarity

The 2D representation of the Lewis structure may not accurately represent the molecule's shape. Symmetry can be determined after determining the molecule's VSEPR shape.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:26 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Deciding Between Trigonal Planar vs Trigonal Pyramidal
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Deciding Between Trigonal Planar vs Trigonal Pyramidal

You first look at the number of regions of electron density around the central atom. In the trigonal planar shape, there are 3 bonding electron pairs around the central atom. In the trigonal pyramidal shape, there are 4 regions of electron density around the central atom, but the shape is not tetrah...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 9:41 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance Hybrids
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Re: Resonance Hybrids

The actual structure of the molecule is a hybrid of all possible resonance structures- after drawing all possible resonance structures, you can just draw arrows to indicate that the actual structure is actually an average of all these structures.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 9:30 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Ionization energy and electronegativity
Replies: 8
Views: 30

Re: Ionization energy and electronegativity

The trends for ionization energy and electronegativity in the periodic table increase across a period and down a group. Ionization energy is the energy it takes to remove a valence electron from an atom. Electronegativity measures how much the atom is able to attract electrons.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 9:26 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: dipole moments
Replies: 7
Views: 27

Re: dipole moments

Larger differences in electronegativity lead to larger dipole moments (the electrons are pulled towards the atom with higher electronegativity).
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 9:21 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: formal charge
Replies: 7
Views: 44

Re: formal charge

If a molecule can potentially have multiple possible structures, it is a good idea to calculate the formal charge of each atom so that you are drawing the lowest energy structure possible.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 9:17 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: incomplete octet
Replies: 6
Views: 56

Re: incomplete octet

H, Li, and Be all form duplets in Lewis structures to achieve the noble gas configuration of He. B also has an incomplete octet of 6 electrons (like in the compound BF3) because F is unlikely to share more electrons with boron due to its high electronegativity.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:55 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: Polarity

You can compare the electronegativity of the elements using the periodic table- there will be a greater electron density around the element with a higher electronegativity.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:46 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Polarizability

For cations, polarizing power decreases down a group and increases across a period (it is highest for small, highly charged cations). For anions, their polarizability increases down a group and decreases across a period (highest for larger anions).
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:39 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Expanded Octet for Lowest Formal Charge
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: Expanded Octet for Lowest Formal Charge

Atoms in period 3 and beyond can have expanded octets. In order to make each atom's formal charge as close as possible to 0 (and find the lowest energy molecule) we can use expanded octets if necessary.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 03, 2019 1:02 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Noble Gases and Electronegativity
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Re: Noble Gases and Electronegativity

Electronegativity increases across a period in the periodic table, with the exception of noble gases, which have no electronegativity because of their complete octet.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Nov 03, 2019 12:53 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures for ionic compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: Lewis Structures for ionic compounds

Ionic compounds can also be drawn as Lewis structures- with compounds that have mostly ionic character (like NaCl) you could draw the lone pair electrons as belonging to Cl rather than being shared. The compound would be written as two separate ions, Na+ and Cl-
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:50 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded valence shells
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Expanded valence shells

Yes, elements from period 3 onwards will have expanded valence shells because the octet rule applies only to the s and p blocks of the periodic table.

In PCl5, P forms five bonds (10 shared electrons) as it is bonded to 5 atoms of Cl.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Putting valence electrons on N than H
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: Putting valence electrons on N than H

The electron configuration of hydrogen is 1s2, so it can only share 2 electrons (1 bond). Therefore the remaining valence electrons must be added to nitrogen.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:41 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: What is the difference between an anion and cation?
Replies: 7
Views: 41

Re: What is the difference between an anion and cation?

Anions and cations form usually between metals and nonmetals: when one atom's electronegativity is significantly higher than the other atom's so that one atom removes an electron from the other. As a result, a positive ion (cation) and a negative ion (anion) are formed. An example would be the salt ...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:38 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: HW 2A.21d
Replies: 5
Views: 45

Re: HW 2A.21d

Ag is one of the exceptions to the usual electron configuration pattern. Since a full d-shell is much more stable than a partially full d-shell (d9), the electron configuration becomes [Kr]4d10 5s1.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:33 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Bonds and Electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds and Electrons

In an ionic bond, one atom removes an electron from another atom, so you will be more likely to find an electron near the more electronegative atom (anion). Covalent bonds can either be polar or nonpolar- in polar covalent bonds, it is more likely to find an electron near the more electronegative at...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:49 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Inner e- and Outer e-
Replies: 14
Views: 85

Re: Inner e- and Outer e-

In multi-electron atoms, outer electrons experience less electrostatic attraction to the nucleus than the inner electrons do because of the shielding effect. This results in the effective nuclear charge felt by the valence (outer) electrons to be less than the inner electrons.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:19 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: One photon one atom interaction
Replies: 14
Views: 87

Re: One photon one atom interaction

Increasing the frequency of the light after the threshold energy has already been surpassed would increase the KE of the ejected electron. Increasing the intensity of the light (proportional to the number of photons) would increase the number of electrons ejected, because of the one photon-one elect...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:10 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Problem 1.27
Replies: 2
Views: 66

Re: Problem 1.27

Given the frequency of the light as 6.27 * 10^14 Hz, you can use the equation c=v(wavelength) to calculate the wavelength of the light. For part b, given the wavelength as 421 nm you can calculate the frequency using the same c=v (wavelength) equation.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Oct 19, 2019 8:47 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Difference between photon vs particle
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: Difference between photon vs particle

Photons refer to a specific type of particle- the discrete packets of light energy. In certain behaviors of light (like the photoelectric effect) the photons of light behave like general particles, whereas some of its other behaviors (diffraction) are wavelike.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Oct 19, 2019 8:18 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: n, l, m
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: n, l, m

"n" is the principal quantum number, which defines the size and energy of the orbital. "l" indicates the orbital's shape (s, p, d, or f) or its angular momentum (how 'fast' the electron moves around the nucleus). "m" tells us the electron's orientation in the orbital. W...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:45 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Question from module
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: Question from module

The kinetic energy of an electron is its mass x velocity. You can use the mass of an electron to find the KE, which is 9.11 x 10^-31 kg (the mass of an electron will be given to us on tests).
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:29 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: de broglies equation
Replies: 6
Views: 62

Re: de broglies equation

De Broglie's equation (wavelength = h/p) shows the relationship between wavelength and momentum (mass x velocity). The equation can be used to calculate the wavelength of a particle that is small enough to have wavelike properties. The wavelength will also be more dependent on the mass of the partic...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:02 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light's Behavior
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Light's Behavior

At the larger scale, light appears to be continuous like a wave, but when light is observed as the microscopic scale, it is actually made up of a stream of discrete photons. Certain behaviors of light are characteristic of waves (diffraction patterns) and other behaviors are characteristic of partic...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:54 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: G5
Replies: 2
Views: 85

Re: G5

You can use the given mass of the solid and the volume of the water added to calculate the molarity of the sodium carbonate solution, which is 0.07967 M. In sodium carbonate there is a 2:1 mole ratio of Na+ to Na2CO3. Then you can use the M1V1=M2V2 equation can be used to calculate the volumes of ea...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Tue Oct 08, 2019 10:24 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Estimating the greatest mass percentage
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Estimating the greatest mass percentage

Yes, in nitric acid (NO3), if you have an approximate idea of the atomic masses of N and O you can estimate which element will have the greatest mass percentage by comparing the ratio of N to O atoms.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:00 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: H.1 Chemical Principle 7th edition
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: H.1 Chemical Principle 7th edition

We can't add O to the equation because oxygen is not one of the products produced in this chemical reaction.

The correctly balanced equation would be 2Cu + SO2 --> 2CuO + S.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:57 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Fundamentals L39
Replies: 2
Views: 65

Re: Fundamentals L39

We find the identity of the oxide by using the known masses to determine the empirical formula of the oxide. We know that the mass of the crucible and product together is 28.35 g, so the mass of the total product is 1.9 g. The mass of tin (Sn) in the product is 1.50 g so we know the mass of O in the...
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:48 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity
Replies: 9
Views: 76

Re: Molarity

Molarity can be determined by dividing the moles of solute by the volume (in liters) of solution; molarity essentially just represents how concentrated a particular solution is.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:34 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Avogadro's Number
Replies: 8
Views: 131

Re: Avogadro's Number

Yes, Avogadro's number represents the number of objects, in this case, atoms, in 1 mole. For problem E7, you divide the given number of atoms (2.1 x 10^9) by Avogadro's number (6.022 x 10^23) to determine the number of moles of carbon present.
by Maya Gollamudi 1G
Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:26 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Law of Conservation of Mass?
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: Law of Conservation of Mass?

The Law of Conservation of Mass tells us that no mass is lost or gained in a chemical reaction (total mass of reactants = total mass of products). In this problem the total mass of reactants is 12g, while the mass of the product is 14g, so this reaction is not possible.

Go to advanced search