Search found 51 matches

by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:03 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: edta
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: edta

EDTA is a hexadentate because it binds to a central atom 6 times. These coordinate covalent bonds are made with the atoms that have lone pairs (the 2 N's and 4 O's).
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:00 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: weak bases
Replies: 2
Views: 102

Re: weak bases

The smaller the value of Kb and the greater the value of pKb, the weaker the base. Also, if the conjugate acid of this base is strong, then that is an indicator that the base is weak.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:57 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Differentiating Lewis Acids/Bases
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: Differentiating Lewis Acids/Bases

If you were to draw the Lewis structure out for NH3 (Ammonia), you would see that there is a lone pair on the nitrogen atom. Since Lewis bases are electron donors, this lone pair would be donated for another atom to bind to it. For example, when NH3 and water react, an H+ binds to the NH3 to become ...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:44 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: polydentate
Replies: 1
Views: 50

Re: polydentate

It can act as mono or bidentate.
"Normally Carbonate is monodentate, because it only has 120 degrees between its Oxygens, so two oxygens cannot bind to the same metal. However, in some cases carbonate bonds to two different metals, making it bidentate." - Patrick Chin 1F
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:41 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxidation State
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: Oxidation State

To find the oxidation state of K2[Ni(CN)4], potassium tetracyanonickel(II), you know potassium, the cation, has a +2 charge. Therefore, the anion must have a -2 charge in order for the compound to be neutral. Knowing that CN- has a negative one charge and there are 4 of those molecules, the oxidatio...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:34 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Naming Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: Naming Ligands

Dr. Lavelle did examples in class using the -o suffix. For example [Ni(CN)4]2- would be tetracyanonickelate (II).
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:28 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Compounds Creation
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Coordination Compounds Creation

The Lewis bases that attach to the central atom, known as ligands, have at least one lone pair of electrons that bonds to the central atom or ion. A coordinate covalent bonds is created and the ligands attached to the central atom make up the coordination sphere.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:24 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Are complex ions the same as coordination compounds?
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Are complex ions the same as coordination compounds?

A complex is a species consisting of a central metal atom or ion to which a number of molecules or ions are attached by coordinate covalent bonds. A coordination compound is an electrically neutral compound in which at least one of the ions present is a complex. A complex is present within a coordin...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:21 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Distinguishing between Strong and Weak Acids/Bases
Replies: 7
Views: 92

Distinguishing between Strong and Weak Acids/Bases

How can someone distinguish a strong acid or base from a weak acid or base? How do you know if a compound will fully deprotonate or protonate in a solution?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:18 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Meaning of the constants
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Meaning of the constants

What does the acidity and basicity constant represent in regards to pH and pOH?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Dec 01, 2019 2:17 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Acidic Oxide
Replies: 1
Views: 34

Acidic Oxide

If an acidic oxide is an oxide that reacts with water to form a Bronsted Acid, can someone explain this reaction: 2 NaOH + CO2 --> Na2CO3 + H2O
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:37 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Biological Examples
Replies: 10
Views: 88

Re: Biological Examples

I'm guessing that the biological functions of the different transition metals will be tested along with the role of cisplatin in chemotherapy. It might also help to know why cisplatin is effective in comparison to transplatin.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:31 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Biological Examples
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Biological Examples

I'm guessing that the biological functions of the different transition metal will also be tested: Chromium - Assists Insulin in control of blood sugar; Iron - Myoglobin, Hemoglobin, e- transfer in the oxidation of carbohydrates, proteins, fats; Cobalt - Vit B12; Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn - critical for enzyme ...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:18 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: Chelating Ligands

Chelating ligands can bind cations tightly. Therefore, the larger the number of ring closures to a transition metal, the more stable the compound is.
Source: Britannica
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:10 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Transplatin?
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Re: Transplatin?

In addition, by forming a coordination complex with DNA, cisplatin is able to stop further cell division.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:07 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Heme Complex
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Heme Complex

Can someone explain what a Heme Complex is? Dr. Lavelle drew a diagram with a central atom that is a transition metal, Fe, bound to the lone pairs of 4 nitrogen atoms with a structure drawn around the perimeter of the molecule. I am having a hard time identifying the different aspects of this molecu...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:43 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: How to study for VSEPR?
Replies: 9
Views: 142

Re: How to study for VSEPR?

2.E has a lot of great practice VSEPR problems. Also, if you look up a chart with all of the shapes and bond angles listed, then you can test yourself on all the different molecular shapes and the corresponding bond angles.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:35 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent shape and angles
Replies: 6
Views: 68

Re: Bent shape and angles

If a molecule has 3 total domains, then one lone pair and two bonded atoms will result in a bent shape.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Notation used in VSEPR
Replies: 8
Views: 105

Notation used in VSEPR

Do we need to be able to use the notation when identifying the shapes of molecules? For example, NH3 --> AX3E.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:25 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: How to tell polar or non polar from lewis structure?
Replies: 9
Views: 125

Re: How to tell polar or non polar from lewis structure?

If a hydrogen bond is present anywhere throughout the molecule and the dipoles do not cancel due to symmetry, than that respective molecule will be polar.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:20 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma And Pi Bond Concept Question
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Sigma And Pi Bond Concept Question

What did Professor Lavelle mean when he said that Pi bonds do not allow bonds to rotate? Why does this happen?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:31 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen bonding base pairs
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: Hydrogen bonding base pairs

AT and GC are the nucleotide base pairs that match up in the DNA structure. AT is held together by 2 hydrogen bonds while GC are held together by 3 hydrogen bonds.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:25 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen bonding
Replies: 7
Views: 48

Re: Hydrogen bonding

Hydrogen is also very important because it is plays an integral role in maintaining the shape of proteins such as DNA, RNA, cellulose, etc.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:19 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: What's a dipole
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: What's a dipole

You can determine if there is a dipole moment if you identify the relative electronegativities of each element in a respective compound. The larger the difference between the values, the larger the dipole moment.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:12 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Character
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Covalent Character

Can someone explain what it means to have increasing covalent character?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:56 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Incomplete octets
Replies: 3
Views: 129

Re: Incomplete octets

There are some exceptions such as boron being most stable with 6 shared electrons and hydrogen with 2.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: MeV
Replies: 2
Views: 41

Re: MeV

M is just the prefix that means Mega. It is Megaelectron volts.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:41 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Distortion
Replies: 4
Views: 41

Distortion

Can someone explain further how highly distorted electrons are highly polarizable? I'm not exactly sure what distorted means in this case.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:39 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Strength and Length
Replies: 18
Views: 219

Strength and Length

Can someone explain the relationship between the length of the bonds and how the strength of those bonds increase or decrease accordingly?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:23 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: En
Replies: 3
Views: 53

Re: En

You would use this formula when you want to find the energy of an electron at a certain energy level. This can be used further to find the change in energy between energy levels.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:18 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge and Nuclear Charge
Replies: 6
Views: 81

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge and Nuclear Charge

The nuclear charge is the total charge of the nucleus while effective nuclear charge is the charge the the outermost electron experiences. Therefore, the nuclear charge is always greater than the effective nuclear charge.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:05 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: IE, EA, EN, AR Trends
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: IE, EA, EN, AR Trends

Also take this into account while studying Ionization energy: the further away an electron is from the nucleus, the easier it is to remove.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:01 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Effective charge
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: Effective charge

The effective nuclear charge increases left to right across a period due to the increasing atomic number of the elements. However, the nuclear charge decreases going down a respective group due to the effects of shielding.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:55 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Double bond placement
Replies: 15
Views: 177

Re: Double bond placement

Like Dr. Lavelle did in lecture, I would add up all of the valence electrons present in the compound, also taking into account the charge of the compound, first. Then, I would place the element with the lower ionization energy as the central atom. Arrange the other atoms around the central atom and ...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:47 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: P, Cl, and S octet tule exceptions
Replies: 4
Views: 52

P, Cl, and S octet tule exceptions

Why is it that these specific elements have the ability to expand their octet to accommodate more electrons?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:20 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: S-orbitals symmetry
Replies: 4
Views: 73

Re: S-orbitals symmetry

The s- orbital is symmetrical because it has no nodal planes. Therefore, there it has a symmetric e- potential distribution. The p- orbital has two lobes on either side of the nucleus, creating a nodal plane with a px, py, pz axes.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:55 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Which Element to Use in Electron Configurations
Replies: 5
Views: 73

Re: Which Element to Use in Electron Configurations

Unless it asks for the full electron configuration of an element, noble gas configuration is an easier way to write it. The noble gas is used because they have no more room for electrons and are stable.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:16 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 1D.19
Replies: 6
Views: 81

Re: 1D.19

a) 3 orbitals
b) 5 orbitals
c) 1 orbital
d) 7 orbitals
To find the orbitals present in a respective subshell, you identify the subshell and the l value it is associated with. For s, l=0. For p, l = 1. For d, l = 2. The number of orbitals is then determined by the ml value: l, l-1,..., -l.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:55 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Special Case Electron Configuration
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: Special Case Electron Configuration

It would probably be helpful to know other exceptions in the periodic table. For example gold would be {Xe} 4f14, 5d10, 6s1. But, Professor Lavelle also mentioned that we would primarily be focusing on s, p, d orbitals. Those exceptions that you mentioned earlier are probably the main ones that we w...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Positive Sign on the Magnetic Quantum Number
Replies: 2
Views: 60

Re: Positive Sign on the Magnetic Quantum Number

I always put the plus sign to be safe in order to differentiate from the negative values of the magnetic quantum number.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:38 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Homework for Week 4
Replies: 4
Views: 79

Re: Homework for Week 4

Yes, we do 5 more problems from the Quantum World section.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:39 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Lyman and Balmer
Replies: 3
Views: 80

Re: Lyman and Balmer

The Lyman series is the ultraviolet region and the Balmer series is the visible region. In the Balmer series, the spectral emission lines result from energy transitions between higher energy levels down until the 2nd energy level (astronomy.swin.edu). In the Lyman series, the spectral emission lines...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:25 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atom Spectroscopy
Replies: 2
Views: 75

Re: Atom Spectroscopy

The equation, -h*R/n^2=E(n), is used to calculate the change in energy for a Hydrogen atom, as it gives accurate results. As this equation is used for elements with more than one electron, then this equation starts to produce inaccurate results. (ThoughtCo.)
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:54 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 42

De Broglie's Equation

Why can't De Broglie's Equation be used for light in order to find its frequency or wavelength?
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:42 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: wave like properties
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Re: wave like properties

In addition, in Professor Lavelle's lecture, he showed us an example of light passing through two openings in a barrier, proving how light waves show diffraction patterns, both constructive and destructive interference. All matter has wavelike properties but it can be only noticed for moving objects...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:34 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Properties of electron being Particle v Wave
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Properties of electron being Particle v Wave

Also, diffraction patterns results from constructive and destructive interference. Since diffraction patterns result from interacting waves, electrons must have wavelike properties in addition to particlelike properties.
by Aayush Patel 3B
Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:48 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Units
Replies: 5
Views: 114

Re: Units

I am not sure exactly to what extent we need to know units but memorizing this list of prefixes and its values will probably help. Mega - - kilo hecto deca base deci centi milli - - micro - - nano - - pico Every unit to the right of "base", including the dashes, decreases by a factor of 10...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:39 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Mass % Composition
Replies: 7
Views: 195

Re: Mass % Composition

In order to find the mass percentage composition of citral, you would multiply the number of carbon atoms by the molar mass of a carbon atom. Since there are 10 atoms of carbon, you would multiply it by 12.01 (mass of carbon) giving you a total of 120.1 g/mol. You would do the same for hydrogen and ...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:24 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Avogadro's Number [ENDORSED]
Replies: 12
Views: 405

Re: Avogadro's Number [ENDORSED]

A good example of when to use avogadro's number can be seen in example E.1 in the textbook. The number of hydrogen atoms is given in a sample, 1.29 X 10^24 H atoms. The questions wants to know how many moles of hydrogen atoms can be stored in a hydrogen storage device. Avogadro's number comes into p...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:56 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Naming Compounds?
Replies: 10
Views: 327

Re: Naming Compounds?

Nomenclature for compounds such as NH3 (ammonia), SO4 2- (sulfate), etc. are the compounds that have to be memorized. However, I found naming inorganic molecular compounds to be a little easier because it can be done just by identifying the names of the two elements in the molecular compound, along ...
by Aayush Patel 3B
Tue Oct 01, 2019 5:39 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Moles and Molar Masses E. 23
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Moles and Molar Masses E. 23

Question E. 23 asks to calculate the amount of moles of Cu 2+ ions in a 3.00 g of CuBr2. I am confused on how to finish the problem after finding the amount of moles of CuBr2.

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