Search found 63 matches

by VPatankar_3L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:22 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: X was ignored
Replies: 17
Views: 32

Re: X was ignored

The -x was ignored because the value would have been so small that 0.1-x would be rounded to 0.1. If K is less than 10^-3, you generally ignore the -x and use the initial concentration without explicitly factoring in the change.
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Jan 19, 2020 3:33 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6B.11 part a ii
Replies: 1
Views: 3

Re: 6B.11 part a ii

You can use M1V1 = M2V2 where M1 is the concentration of the original solution, M2 is 0.178 mol/L from part i, V2 is 500 mL, and V1 is 5 mL. You are using 5mL for V1 because that is the volume of the original solution that is used to dilute it to 500 mL.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:15 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6C.13
Replies: 2
Views: 14

Re: 6C.13

You could use the pKa to find the pKb by subtracting pKa value from 14. The lower the pKb value, the stronger the base.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Jan 16, 2020 1:13 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: percentage reacted
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: percentage reacted

When you are writing out your ICE table, you want to find the concentration of reactants and products at equilibrium. For your initial concentration, you would calculate 0.4 mol/3 L H2 to find the initial concentration of H2 which is 0.133 mol/L. For the change in concentration, you would multiply 0...
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:56 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5.35 part b
Replies: 4
Views: 26

Re: 5.35 part b

Yes I think you should always convert from Pa to atm or bar before you continue with calculations.
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Jan 12, 2020 12:50 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Partial pressure
Replies: 4
Views: 18

Re: Partial pressure

The partial pressure refers to the pressure of a gas that could be calculated if it were alone in a container of the same volume and at the same temperature as the original mixture.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Tables
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: ICE Tables

When writing out your equilibrium constant, you wouldn't consider liquids and solids present in the reaction since they are pure substances and don't change over the course of the reaction. So when you write out your ICE box, you would only include gases and aqueous products and reactions.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:56 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Changing Kc [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: Changing Kc [ENDORSED]

A change in pressure is brought about by a change in volume. A change in pressure can cause the reaction to shift to the left or to the right based on the number of moles of products and reactants. But this shift occurs to restore the value of the equilibrium constant.
by VPatankar_3L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 9:09 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.25 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: 5I.25 [ENDORSED]

1. First, calculate the concentration of all gasses by dividing the amount in mols (this is given) by the volume (5L) 2. Set up your ICE box (as shown below) y writing down the initial concentration for all gases 3. Write out the equilibrium constant expression 4. calculate the value of x which repr...
by VPatankar_3L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 8:49 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5.33
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Re: 5.33

Hi! Energy is actually required to break bonds which means that a certain amount of energy must be provided to the reaction in order for the dissociation of X2 to occur. As you can see in this image (https://i.stack.imgur.com/jm5uO.png) bound atoms have low potential energy, and energy is required f...
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:06 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Polarity/Dipoles
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Re: Polarity/Dipoles

What does it mean when dipoles "cancel out?" Dipoles could cancel out if the are facing the same direction and if the atoms surrounding the central atom are all the same. This would mean that the electronegativity difference between the central atom and each of the bound atoms is the same...
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:01 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Question on Test 2
Replies: 11
Views: 114

Re: Question on Test 2

If the question asks "how many atoms on the structure would form a hydrogen bond?" you would just count the number of atoms that would have hydrogen bonding sites. But if it asks for the number of hydrogen bonding sites, you would count each available lone pair where bonding could occur.
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:52 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Trend for Polarizability
Replies: 5
Views: 41

Re: Trend for Polarizability

Cations that are small and have a high charge have large polarizing power. Anions that are large and have small charge have high polarizability.
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:40 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: relationship between frequency and intensity?
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Re: relationship between frequency and intensity?

The intensity, or the number of electrons emitted from the metal, can be acknowledged when the frequency of the incident light is at or above the threshold frequency. If the threshold frequency is not reached, no electrons will be ejected no matter how high the intensity of the light is.
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:37 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: bond strength
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: bond strength

You can compare the bond length of binary acids whose central atom varies down a group to determine which acid is stronger or weaker.
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Dec 01, 2019 11:15 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugate acid and conjugate base
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Conjugate acid and conjugate base

The acid on the reactants side of the equation will have a proton that it will lose on the products side. This is how you can identify the Bronsted acid on the reactants side, and the opposite is true for the Bronsted base. Once you have found the Bronsted acid and base, you should remember that the...
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Nov 28, 2019 11:52 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Error in 6B.5 e)?
Replies: 2
Views: 227

Re: Error in 6B.5 e)?

Make sure you have the correct decimal places for your molarity. 13.6 mg --> 0.0136 g
moles NaOH = (0.0136 g)/(40 g/mol) = 3.4 * 10^-4 mol
Molarity = (3.4 * 10^-4 mol)/(0.350 L) = 9.7143 *10^-4 mol/L
pOH = -log [9.7143 *10^-4 mol/L] = 3.01
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Nov 28, 2019 11:34 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Weak Acid Strength
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Weak Acid Strength

The greater the electronegativity of A in A-H for binary acids, across a period, the stronger the acid. The stronger the bond between A and H in A-H down a group, the weaker the acid. For oxoacids, the greater the number of oxygen atoms bound to the central atom, the stronger the acid. Oxoacids can ...
by VPatankar_3L
Tue Nov 26, 2019 10:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Atoms in the same plane
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Atoms in the same plane

Also, if the structure contains trigonal planar or linear arrangement, the atoms involved will be in the same plane.
by VPatankar_3L
Tue Nov 26, 2019 10:15 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Shapes
Replies: 4
Views: 35

Re: Shapes

If the central transition metal is bound to four ions or molecules, it is considered either square planar or tetrahedral. Generally, you don't assume that transition metals have lone pairs, which is why the shapes of coordination compounds aren't as extensive.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Direction in anions increase in polarizability
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Direction in anions increase in polarizability

Anions that have the greatest polarizability are those that are large and less electronegative. Cations that have greater polarization power are those that are smaller and have a high charge.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:36 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: How to tell
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Re: How to tell

Hydrogen bonds occur between a Hydrogen atom that is covalently bonded to a more electronegative atom (F, N, O) and another electronegative atom that has lone pairs. An ion-dipole bond is an electrostatic interaction between an ion and a molecule that has a dipole.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:18 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: polarizability
Replies: 9
Views: 63

Re: polarizability

Larger molecules will have stronger London Dispersion Forces, which means that their boiling point will be high.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:16 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polar or Nonpolar
Replies: 5
Views: 68

Re: Polar or Nonpolar

Generally, you can look at the terminal toms to determine whether a structure will be polar or polar. With linear, trigonal planar, and tetrahedral structures, if the terminal atoms are the same the molecules will be nonpolar. But if the terminal atoms are different, the molecules will be polar. Reg...
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:12 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2F.15
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: 2F.15

S character is directly proportional to the bond angle, so as the s character of a hybrid orbital increases the bond angle increases as well. In VSEPR, electrons are arranged to experience minimum repulsion. A high s character would increase the electron density across the central atom, so the bond ...
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 15, 2019 3:03 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Contribution of each structure?
Replies: 4
Views: 43

Re: Contribution of each structure?

I think that if you draw a Lewis Structure for the molecule, you will see that the atom that forms a double or triple bond with the central atom is contributing more electrons than the atom that is forming a single bond with the central atom.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 15, 2019 3:01 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Problem 3F.15
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Re: Problem 3F.15

Polarity plays a part in determining which structure has a higher boiling point. AsF3 has the higher boiling point because it is a polar molecule and thus has dipole-dipole interactions, while AsF5 is a nonpolar molecule with London dispersion forces. London dispersion forces are weaker than dipole-...
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:57 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: Orbitals

In terms of resonance Lewis Structure, electrons can be delocalized if they are free to move throughout the plane. This means that a double bond between Oxygen and Nitrogen, for example in the structure NO3, can be moved between any of the Oxygens while the remaining two form a single bond with Nitr...
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:51 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Oxygen
Replies: 9
Views: 68

Re: Oxygen

Oxygen can form double, single, or triple bonds depending on the atom it is bonding with. Oxygen can form a triple bond with Carbon since the total number of valence electrons is 10 which means that there are 5 pairs of electrons. The only way that you can form five pairs of electrons for a CO Lewis...
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 15, 2019 9:46 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent or angular?
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Bent or angular?

I think you can also call it V shaped, although that sounds a little informal.
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:29 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Chlorine in center: electronegativity vs. formal charge
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Re: Chlorine in center: electronegativity vs. formal charge

I think it has to do with the fact that Chlorine's atomic radius is larger than that of Oxygen, so Oxygen's outermost electrons are held more tightly to the nucleus than Chlorine's outermost electrons. Also, the change in electronegativity is greater as you move up or down a group, than if you move ...
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:25 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Unequal Contribution
Replies: 3
Views: 53

Re: Unequal Contribution

If you are referring to ionic bonds then you just draw both atoms separately with their complete octet and place them next to each other, without bonds. The anion will pull electrons away from the cation. If you are talking about resonance structures, the atom that is either double bonded or triple ...
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:09 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Textbook question 2.25
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Textbook question 2.25

I think for the first question, the answer is that the CN bond in H3CNH2 is longer than the CN bond in HCN because Carbon and Nitrogen share a triple bond in HCN while they only share a single bond in H3CNH2. Single bonds are longer than triple bonds because less electrons are being shared. For part...
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 11:38 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: How to know where a double bond should go?
Replies: 10
Views: 71

Re: How to know where a double bond should go?

If the central atom is in row one and row two, with the exception of the incomplete octet elements, you should calculate the number of valence electrons of the structure and then divide by two to find the number of electron pairs. When you add all of the atoms around the central atom and account for...
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 11:22 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Chlorine in center: electronegativity vs. formal charge
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Re: Chlorine in center: electronegativity vs. formal charge

Also since Oxygen is more electronegative that Chlorine, it can carry the -1 charge.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Nov 07, 2019 11:18 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Rydberg Equation
Replies: 5
Views: 78

Re: Rydberg Equation

The energy gaps between the energy levels of the Balmer series are much smaller than the gaps for the Lyman series, so that's why the frequency produced is also smaller.
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 01, 2019 10:52 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: 2C.3
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: 2C.3

I think the answer key is saying that all three are possible resonance structures since Chlorine is in the third row of the period table and has an expanded octet. Thus, in the first diagram chlorine can have eight electrons surrounding in, in the second diagram Chlorine can have 10 electron, and in...
by VPatankar_3L
Fri Nov 01, 2019 10:44 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: 1B.15 help w/ part c
Replies: 2
Views: 40

Re: 1B.15 help w/ part c

For this question, you have to remember the equation: E photon - work function = Kinetic Energy (of electron). In this situation, the E=hv equation applies to the photon and finding the energy of the photon. But to find the energy of the emitted electron, you need to use KE=(1/2)m(v)^2.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 31, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Homework 2C 1
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Homework 2C 1

Another thing you could do is calculate the total number of valence electrons for each molecule. If the total number is an odd number, the specie is a radical.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 31, 2019 7:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Sulfur Dioxide
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: Sulfur Dioxide

If the question asks you to draw two resonance structures for Sulfur Dioxide, I think you should do both. But if it just asks for the Lewis structure, draw the one with the lowest formal charge.
by VPatankar_3L
Mon Oct 28, 2019 2:16 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 10
Views: 52

Re: Lone Pairs

Lone pairs are pairs of electrons in the valence shell that are not shared with another atom through bonding. The lone pairs in a lewis structure are the pairs of electrons that are drawn as dots around the atom. For example, in NH3, N has one lone pair of electrons because it shares six with the th...
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:11 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: 1B. 5
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: 1B. 5

You should convert the value of electron volts to Joules, and then write the equation of E=hv as E=(hc)/(wavelength). Then you can rewrite this equation as wavelength = (hc)/(E) and solve.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 24, 2019 4:41 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: lewis drawings
Replies: 8
Views: 91

Re: lewis drawings

I think there are some calculations you can do to tell which arrangement is the most stable. So, I think he might have us draw the most stable configuration.
by VPatankar_3L
Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Double Bond vs Single Bond Length
Replies: 6
Views: 112

Re: Double Bond vs Single Bond Length

The length of the bonds is in part based on the distance between two atoms. Atoms that form double bonds with one another have a stinger attraction between them which means they are pulled closer together than if they were connected by a single bond. Thus, the distance between them is smaller which ...
by VPatankar_3L
Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:53 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Protons and Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 35

Re: Protons and Electrons

Yes, I think that if a proton and neutron had the same wavelength, they would have the same velocity. You can use De Broigle's to determine that wavelength = h/p which is the same as: wavelength = h/mv. v=h/(m*wavelength) and the mass of a proton and neutron are the same. If the wavelength is also t...
by VPatankar_3L
Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:49 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: 1A.11
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: 1A.11

The Lyman series is a spectrum series that produces ultraviolet emission lines from any energy level greater than or equal to 2 (n>=2) to energy level of one (n=1). The Balmer series produces emission lines from any energy level greater than or equal to 3 (n>=3) to energy level of two (n = 2). The a...
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Chem Video Module-test, Joule Conversion
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: Chem Video Module-test, Joule Conversion

You can convert the kJ to J by multiplying the energy by 10^3 joules. And the formula for kinetic energy is KE = (1/2)(mv^2) which can be used to solve this problem.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 17, 2019 3:35 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Heisenberg's Indeterminacy Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Heisenberg's Indeterminacy Equation

Yes it's mostly used to find the indeterminancy in the position or the momentum. But you can use the value you calculated for the indeterminancy of the momentum to solve for the indeterminancy of the velocity of that particle.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 17, 2019 12:04 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: 1B15
Replies: 3
Views: 46

Re: 1B15

Yes, to get the wavelength of the electron you can't use c = 3 * 10^8 because it is the speed of light, thus the speed of a photon. The question has specified the velocity of the electron, so you have to use this velocity in De Broglie's equation.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 17, 2019 11:59 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Units for E [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: Units for E [ENDORSED]

Energy in the situations that discuss light is considered as J/photon. If the energy is provided in eV (electron Volts), you will have to convert it to J/photon. The conversion factor is about 1 eV = 1.6 *10^-19 J/photon.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 17, 2019 11:54 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Rydberg's Equation [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: Rydberg's Equation [ENDORSED]

You use Rydberg's equation when the question talks about an electron transitioning from one energy level to another. Generally, you will use it to sole for the final or the initial energy level, based on the information that is provided. Sometimes, you will also be asked to calculate the frequency o...
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:36 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: 1B. 21
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: 1B. 21

You should use the equation, wavelength = (plank's constant)/(mass x velocity). You can convert the mass of the baseball into grams and then just plug in the rest of the information.
by VPatankar_3L
Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:30 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Diffraction Pattern
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Diffraction Pattern

Constructive interference refers to waves that are in phase. This means that you can add them to give rise to a larger wave. Destructive interference refers to waves that are out of phase, which means that you can subtract the waves' peaks. If both waves are at their highest peak at a given moment, ...
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:48 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Formulas
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Formulas

Yes, both equations will essentially give you the same result. Dr. Lavelle suggested using the H-atom equation because it really helps you see whats going on during the transitions, and how the energy is affected. This will allow you to understand the fact that energy is emitted (and thus lost) when...
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:42 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Range of Sig Figs
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Re: Range of Sig Figs

My TA said to write each calculation answer with at least four decimal places after the decimal point so that when you do further calculations, you have the most precise value from before. But the final answer should be written with the correct number of significant figures.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 10, 2019 11:40 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Test 1 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 107
Views: 2724

Re: Test 1 [ENDORSED]

Make sure you bring a scientific calculator. Graphing calculators aren't allowed.
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:08 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic vs Covalent
Replies: 29
Views: 375

Re: Ionic vs Covalent

I think in general, ionic bonds are stronger than covalent bonds. But covalent bonds are stronger than ionic bonds in water.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:15 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Dilution Calculations
Replies: 3
Views: 57

Re: G.23

The glucose and other sugars aren't relevant because there are no chloride ions present in glucose.
by VPatankar_3L
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:13 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Empirical and Molecular Formulas
Replies: 13
Views: 129

Re: Empirical and Molecular Formulas

Generally if you're given a molecular formula, you will be able to reduce the number of moles of each element by a certain factor. If you're given an empirical formula, you can't divide by a number to reduce the umber of moles of the element in the formula.
by VPatankar_3L
Tue Oct 01, 2019 4:00 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: G.25 Dilution
Replies: 4
Views: 52

Re: G.25 Dilution

I don't think you can multiply 10 mL by 90 to get the answer. If you're doubling the volume each time, you would be going from 10 mL to 20 mL to 40 mL to 80 mL to 160 mL and so on, and the concentration would continue to be halved. To find the final concentration, you should multiply 0.1 mol/L by (0...
by VPatankar_3L
Tue Oct 01, 2019 3:46 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Tips for Balancing Chemical Equations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 14
Views: 150

Re: Tips for Balancing Chemical Reactions [ENDORSED]

I like to write down the number of moles of each element on both sides of the equation. Then I try to find a common factor for each set of elements. For example, I would count the number of moles of oxygen in the reactants and in the products and find a multiple they have in common.
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Sep 29, 2019 6:04 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Fundamentals L, #35
Replies: 3
Views: 46

Re: Fundamentals L, #35

If you go on the Chemistry 14A website, the professor posted a link to a document that shows the errors in the solution manual and textbook. It's called "Solution Manual Errors" and it says the following: L.35 in the textbook question: In the third reaction step the compound "FeBr2&qu...
by VPatankar_3L
Sun Sep 29, 2019 5:54 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Advice from a Medical Student - Part II [ENDORSED]
Replies: 129
Views: 2894

Re: Advice from a Medical Student - Part II [ENDORSED]

Thank you for you advice! As someone who is interested in the medical field, I enjoyed reading about your story. I wish you the best of luck in the coming years.

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