Search found 64 matches

by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:50 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Constant
Replies: 4
Views: 10

Equilibrium Constant

Is there ever a situation where a solid, liquid, or aqueous solution would be involved in the equilibrium constant expression? or are they always excluded.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:46 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Law of Mass Action
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: Law of Mass Action

The Law of Mass Action gives us the equation K= [C]^c[D^]d/[A]^a[B]^b. The law of mass action allows us to use the ratios of reactants and products of pressures and concentrations to determine the constant.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:40 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Chart
Replies: 5
Views: 15

ICE Chart

When making an ICE chart for a reaction that proceeds in reverse I know the x would be negative but how would you know the reaction is reverse and nor forward? Would it tell you?
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Acids and Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Acids and Bases

Adding acids and bases do not affect the K value because the concentration must still multiply to 1.0x10^-14. Kw represents the equilibrium constant of water and although concentration of the acid and base in solution may change water is in large excess that it remains unchanged and unaffected by a ...
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:16 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kp vs Kc
Replies: 4
Views: 18

Kp vs Kc

I was wondering what situations you would use Kc vs Kp in and why some reactions with all gases use Kc not Kp?
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Jan 09, 2020 10:04 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Temperatures and Equilibrium
Replies: 4
Views: 23

Re: Temperatures and Equilibrium

The equilibrium changes with temperature and can be reached at different temperature but the equilibrium constant will be effected. As temperature increases the value of K decreases.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:51 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Catalysts
Replies: 7
Views: 28

Re: Catalysts

A catalyst speeds up a reaction allowing it to reach the activation energy to be achieved faster. But, the catalyst is not consumed in the reaction.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:47 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: eq constant
Replies: 4
Views: 17

Re: eq constant

Solids and liquids are not included in the reaction quotient because at equilibrium they do not affect the reactant amount. Their activity in the reaction is 1.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:42 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K and Q Values
Replies: 5
Views: 22

Re: K and Q Values

When Q>K a reverse reaction will be favored but when Q<K a forward reaction will be favored.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Jan 09, 2020 9:37 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Difference between K and Q
Replies: 9
Views: 28

Re: Difference between K and Q

K represents the equilibrium constant when the reaction is in equilibrium. Q represents the reaction quotient and is the quotient of activities of products and reactants. Typically you compare the determined q value to a given k value to determine which direction the reaction proceeds.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:17 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Stronger Acid than another
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: Stronger Acid than another

A high Ka and a low pKa indicate a strong acid. Since, pKa is the negative log of Ka it means the acid is more fully dissociated in water.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:12 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: pOH
Replies: 6
Views: 34

Re: pOH

Yes you should know how to calculate pOH and pH. But, both are -log[OH-] or -log[H+] and make sure that if asked for pH and you find pOH that you subtract the pOH from 14 since pOH + pH =14.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:09 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: pH sigfigs
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: pH sigfigs

For pH sig figs still consider the number given in the problem (ex: 2.00g) then find the pH and use three sig figs excluding those left on the decimal (ex: 1.675 not 1.70). The sig fig rules for pH are slightly different but I believe Lavelle posted a guide to them.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Dec 02, 2019 9:02 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: What are some examples of basic oxides and acidic oxides?
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: What are some examples of basic oxides and acidic oxides?

Basic oxides are oxides that form a base in water and acidic oxides are oxides that form an acid when in water. Basic oxides are generally group 1 and 2 elements (example: CaO + H2O --> Ca(OH)2). Acidic oxides are typically groups 14-17 (example: SO2 + H2O --> H2SO3)
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:55 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Non-anionic ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Non-anionic ligands

Ligands can be neutral or negatively charged with a lone pair available. They donate the lone pair to the metal cation that is involved.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Dec 02, 2019 8:50 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bond Sites
Replies: 5
Views: 39

Re: Hydrogen Bond Sites

Hydrogen bonding occurs when there is a hydrogen bonded to a N,O, or F atom and is attracted to another N,O, or F atom or vise versa. So, the number of hydrogen bonding sites consists of the number or lone pairs on the N,O or F molecules (because they must essentially share electrons with the H atom...
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:13 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Why do transition metal cations form complexes?
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Why do transition metal cations form complexes?

Unlike other species, transition metal ions have an empty valence shell orbitals allowing them to accept a pair of electrons. They can also form different complexes as transition metals often have multiple oxidation states.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:49 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2F.13
Replies: 3
Views: 44

Re: 2F.13

The lewis structure of acrylonitrile is attached. To calculate the bond angles you must consider each set of atoms' VSEPR (for example the C,H,H, and C is trigonal planar and therefore the angles are 120 for that set). You repeat this process for each set of at least 3 atoms because for a bond angle...
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:39 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Vapor pressure & IMFs
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: Vapor pressure & IMFs

Vapor pressure is the pressure caused by liquids evaporating. Typically vapor pressure decreases as IMF increases because they can more easily become a gas.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:33 am
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Nodal plane
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: Nodal plane

A nodal plane are regions where there is zero likelihood of finding an electron. In a sigma bond it is a symmetrical sphere and the electron density is cylindrically symmetrical around the axis (imagine a beach ball). In a pi bond there is electron density on either side of the internuclear axis but...
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 26, 2019 11:23 am
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: How can compounds be amphoteric?
Replies: 5
Views: 32

Re: How can compounds be amphoteric?

A compound can be amphoteric if it can accept or donate a proton and it depends on what the compound is reacting with. For example a water molecule reacting with HCl acts as a bronstead base and accepts a proton. But, when water is reacting with NH3, it acts as a bronstead acid and donates a proton.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Nov 20, 2019 6:50 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shape of I3-
Replies: 3
Views: 17

Re: Shape of I3-

In I3- there are three lone pairs around the central atom. The shape is linear because all three of the lone pairs are in the same plane (equatorial) which causes their dipole moments to cancel because they are of equal magnitude and in equally opposing directions.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Nov 20, 2019 6:50 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shape of I3-
Replies: 3
Views: 17

Re: Shape of I3-

In I3- there are three lone pairs around the central atom. The shape is linear because all three of the lone pairs are in the same plane (equatorial) which causes their dipole moments to cancel because they are of equal magnitude and in equally opposing directions.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Nov 20, 2019 6:46 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: pi bonding
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: pi bonding

A pi bond is not two bonds but it does overlap in two places because there is a nodal plane. Since pi bonds overlap side to side there will be overlap above and below the internuclear axis but this is still considered one bond.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Nov 20, 2019 6:44 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: HCL vs NaCl
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: HCL vs NaCl

NaCl has a very large difference in electronegativity compared to HCl resulting is stronger dipole dipole forces. Also, NaCl is larger and has more electrons than hydrogen therefore has stronger London dispersion forces. Since, both of these intermolecular forces are stronger than those in HCl, the ...
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:36 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Is hybridized orbitals all weighed equally in character?
Replies: 4
Views: 21

Re: Is hybridized orbitals all weighed equally in character?

In sp2, the s and p orbitals combine to form 3 orbitals of equal energy all within sp2. So, it's not really that there is an s and two p still separate but now three orbitals of energy in between s and p but closer to p (because 2 electrons are coming from p).
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:32 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: unhybridized p-orbitals
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: unhybridized p-orbitals

The p orbital(s) and s orbital combine to form hybridized orbitals of equal energy. In some instances, unhybridized p orbitals from pi bonds.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:52 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: oxygen vs nitrogen electronegativity
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Re: oxygen vs nitrogen electronegativity

I think of you may be thinking of why oxygen's ionization energy is less than nitrogen. This is because nitrogen has a half filled p orbital which is more stable and ideal than oxygen's 4 electrons in the p orbital.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:48 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: electronegativity
Replies: 5
Views: 39

Re: electronegativity

There isn't a cut off in polar and non-polar molecules as a polar molecule. But, for covalent bonds the difference in electronegativity is less than 1.5 and for ionic bonds the difference in electronegative is greater than 2.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:45 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipoles
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Dipoles

Dipole moments happen when there is a difference in charge due to an unequal sharing of electrons between atoms within a molecule. This causes one part of the molecule to become slightly negative and the other slightly positive. They from due to attractions between other molecules.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Exceptions
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Exceptions

Any element that is in the third period or later or after can have an expanded octet. Typically the central atom has the expanded octet. The elements that like specific bonds are H, O, N, and C. Hydrogen likes 1 bond, oxygen likes 2 bonds, nitrogen likes 3 bonds, and carbon likes 4 bonds.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 8
Views: 40

Re: Sigma and Pi Bonds

Pi bonds are bonds formed by side by side overlap of two p orbitals. Sigma bonds are two electrons in a cylindrically symmetrical cloud between two atoms. Pi bonds occur in p orbitals and sigma bonds occur in s orbitals.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis structure
Replies: 5
Views: 32

Re: Lewis structure

The lewis structure for PO4 3- would be with P in the center and 4 oxygen surrounding, 3 of which connected with a single bond and one with a double bond. You wouldn't put 4 double bonds as you want to distribute the charge. So, having a charge of 3- is really high and not favorable. Also, oxygen is...
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:30 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron affinity
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Re: Electron affinity

Although they are very similar they are slightly different. Electron affinity is something measurable whereas electronegativity is more of a concept that you apply to atoms/molecules. Electron affinity has the same trend (although electronegativity is not truly a trend) where it is increasing as it ...
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:26 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Do higher electronegativity atoms tend to draw more electrons to them?
Replies: 6
Views: 25

Re: Do higher electronegativity atoms tend to draw more electrons to them?

Typically yes the formal charge would become negative. But in CO, the carbon has a negative 1 charge and oxygen has a positive 1 charge. You would think that this should be swapped but you first must satisfy the octet before trying to move or change formal charges. In some cases the more electronega...
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:22 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent character and ionic character
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: Covalent character and ionic character

In an ionic bond electrons are being donated and in covalent bond electrons are being shared. Ionic compounds are very soluble in water as they are polar like the water. Covalent compounds are non-polar and not soluble in water.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:20 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Solubility
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Re: Solubility

Ionic compounds tend to be highly soluble as they are polar. But, covalent compounds tend to not be soluble in water as they share electrons more equally and typically are non-polar. Water, which is polar, can dissolve polar compounds (like dissolves like) so ionic bonds are more soluble in water.
by haileyramsey-1c
Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:58 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Carbon Bonding
Replies: 5
Views: 33

Re: Carbon Bonding

It is equally as favorable as both scenarios result in an octet. If it gains four electrons it would be more difficult for the nucleus to hold on to the electrons strongly as it now has four additional electrons. But nonetheless, carbon wants to have an octet any way how.
by haileyramsey-1c
Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: All Molecules?
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: All Molecules?

Also when a structure has resonance it means that it is in between all forms drawn. This is why resonance structures bonds aren't the length of a single/double/triple bond because the delocalized electrons are moving between atoms giving each bond a different length than may be expected.
by haileyramsey-1c
Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:49 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Understanding Lyman and Balmer series
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Understanding Lyman and Balmer series

What it means when the lyman series is n=1 is that the electron is returning to that state. Yes, n=3 is correct as when you use Rydberg's equation you get 3.
by haileyramsey-1c
Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:43 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Finding Final n
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: Finding Final n

For this problem, you know the nfinal is 1 because UV light is the Lyman series. But you need to first use v=c/λ to find the frequency. Then you use Rydberg equation to find n2 which is 3.
by haileyramsey-1c
Sun Nov 03, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg equation
Replies: 3
Views: 40

Re: Rydberg equation

The Rydberg equation is used to determine the wavelength of light when an electron is changing energy levels. It gives the wavelengths of the spectral line.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 21, 2019 2:14 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Quantum Numbers and Energy Levels
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Quantum Numbers and Energy Levels

The energy levels get close and closer together due to a higher effective nuclear charge. As energy levels go up, the pull on the electrons decreases causing a greater distance between nucleus and outermost orbital. There is such a large gap because there is a greater energy change.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 21, 2019 1:13 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: orientation of orbitals
Replies: 4
Views: 36

Re: orientation of orbitals

In the p-orbital the subscripts of x, y, and z are the different orbitals within the p sub shell and each one has a different orientation. The x, y, and z tell us where the electrons are located and essentially each one is a different axis.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:58 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 2
Views: 50

Re: Electron Configuration

When going from Na to Mg, for example, there is an increase of one electron. So, for the electron configuration in Na it is 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^1 and Mg is 1s^2 2s^2 2p^6 3s^2. The electron is added to the outer most orbital (in this case the 3s orbital).
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:54 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: 1st and 2nd Ionization
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: 1st and 2nd Ionization

Elements in the s-block have low ionization energy because if one or two electrons (depending on if they are in group one or two) are removed, then the atom becomes stable as it has the full octet. Elements in p-block on the other hand have higher ionization energies especially those in group 17, as...
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:47 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Boiling Point
Replies: 4
Views: 341

Re: Boiling Point

Ionic bonds typically have the highest boiling points due to their charges. Then, as mentioned, hydrogen bonds create very high boiling points. This is because it requires the greatest amount of energy to break the intermolecular bonds. Dipole-dipole bonds have a lower boiling point compared to hydr...
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Finding Photons
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Re: Finding Photons

For this problem, first convert to number of joules in 2 seconds so each step after would be in terms of 2 seconds. Then use the equation E=(hc/λ) to find joules/photon. Then in order to find number of photons use the number of joules in 2 sec and the answer from previous step and the units cancel s...
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:34 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Nodal Plane
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Re: Nodal Plane

The nodal plane is the region around the nucleus where you won't find any electrons. The location of the nodal plane(s) are found using Schrodinger's equation to find shape of orbital.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:24 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electrons and Photons
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: Electrons and Photons

The photon must match the energy gap to cause a transition. If the energy is above or below it doesn't match the gap so there will be no transition.
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:21 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: 1A.11 Question about Lyman series
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: 1A.11 Question about Lyman series

For this question it is asking about similarity between lines in series. The lines within a series share the same quantum number for the lower energy level (in which the electron returns to after being excited). So if electrons were to return to the n=1 then they are apart of the Lyman series (visib...
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:15 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Equations
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Re: Equations

Heisenberg's equation stated qualitatively means there is a limit to the accuracy to which the momentum and position of a particle can be known simultaneously. Also, we do not need to know Schrodinger's equation for this course but it tells us where orbitals come from and uses the idea that an elect...
by haileyramsey-1c
Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:08 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1A.11
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: 1A.11

For this question, I said that the lines within a series share the same quantum number for the lower energy level (in which the electron returns to after being excited). This number is associated with the Lyman series for n=1 or Balmer for n=2.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:24 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1A.15
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: 1A.15

The emission and absorption spectra are the same. They must line up and match because the energy emitted or absorbed would be the same. Since the question asks for the initial and final energy levels of the electron so the transition would be from n=1 to n=3
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Oct 09, 2019 5:13 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Atomic Spectra [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Re: Atomic Spectra [ENDORSED]

The lines within a series share the same quantum number for the lower energy level (where the electrons return to after being excited). Since they share this it creates the groupings which then can be identified based on the quantum number where UV is Lyman series, visible is Balmer series and so on.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: High Intensity
Replies: 5
Views: 52

Re: High Intensity

When you increase the intensity of light you increase the number of photons emitted. As intensity increase the amplitude increases. Yes, intensity is like brightness in that intensity is the amount of energy delivered in a certain time to a certain area.
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:46 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Partical VS Wave
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: Partical VS Wave

I'm assuming this is regarding the photoelectric effect so I hope this helps. If light had only wave-like properties, then increasing the intensity of light should release more electrons. But if light behaved like a particle then as intensity increases the number of electrons increases not their spe...
by haileyramsey-1c
Wed Oct 09, 2019 3:24 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy of Electron
Replies: 10
Views: 95

Energy of Electron

What does Dr. Lavelle mean when he says "the energy of an electron is quantized"?
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:41 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: 2 Limiting Reagents
Replies: 5
Views: 45

Re: 2 Limiting Reagents

If both products produce the same amount of product you would still have to look at the molar ratios. For example if in a balanced equation one substance was 3 moles and the other was 1, you would have to multiply the first substance by 3 to determine the needed number of moles. So, just because the...
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Net Moles
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: Net Moles

For this problem the balances equation is 4 C4H10(g) + 26 O2(g) --> 16 CO2 (g) + 20 H2O(g). In order to find the net production of gas you must look at both the reactants and the products since all parts involved are in a gaseous state. So to find the net number of moles you subtract the sum of the ...
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:24 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Delta
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Delta

When the delta symbol is put above the reaction arrow, it means that heat is added to the reaction. I don't think you remove CO2 from the product as you must have same number of atoms in reactants as products, but it is just an additional piece of information.
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:06 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Fractions in front of compounds
Replies: 12
Views: 93

Re: Fractions in front of compounds

The only scenario where you would multiply both sides is if there were fractions involved. When balancing chemical equations you want to have the lowest integer numbers as coefficients. If you had coefficients of 2,4,6,2, for example, you would divide each coefficient by 2 to obtain a correctly bala...
by haileyramsey-1c
Thu Oct 03, 2019 2:59 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs in an Answer
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: Sig Figs in an Answer

Your final answer should have the least precise (or lowest) number of sig figs. In your example, that would mean the answer would have 3 sig figs because an answer cannot be more precise (i.e. have four sig figs in this case) than the least precise number involved.
by haileyramsey-1c
Tue Oct 01, 2019 3:03 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant Calculations Module Question 21
Replies: 2
Views: 41

Re: Limiting Reactant Calculations Module Question 21

Hi Rebecca, I was looking over your steps and I think you forgot to balance the original equation. That way when you do the mole to mole ratio of AgCl to C6H9Cl3 you should have 3AgCl which should make it 3 times the moles that you ended with. Hope that helps and let me know if you have any other qu...

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