Search found 54 matches

by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:44 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: strength
Replies: 1
Views: 53

Re: strength

Electronegativity is important when dealing with atoms in the same row, but bond strength is more important when dealing with elements down a column.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Cation vs. Anion Transition Metal
Replies: 3
Views: 46

Re: Cation vs. Anion Transition Metal

If the coordination complex has an overall negative charge then you add an -ate at the end of the transition metal. If the coordination complex is positive you keep the name of the metal the same.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:14 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: SCN- vs NCS- Lewis Structure
Replies: 1
Views: 32

Re: SCN- vs NCS- Lewis Structure

The lewis structure would be different in the case that for SCN- the S would bind to the central atom while for NCS- the N will bind to the central atom.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:02 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: pH calculation
Replies: 1
Views: 22

pH calculation

At this point, you have the 2 volumes and the concentrations of the solutions. How do you solve for pH after solving the dilution equation?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:18 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: 6D 11 E
Replies: 1
Views: 22

6D 11 E

Decide whether an aqueous solution of each has a pH equal to, greater than, or less than 7.
How do you determine this for E) AlCl3?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:51 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: How to determine if a molecule is a bronsted acid or base?
Replies: 3
Views: 34

Re: How to determine if a molecule is a bronsted acid or base?

Bronsted acid donates proton. Bronsted base accepts protons.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:50 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Oxoacids
Replies: 2
Views: 11

Re: Oxoacids

He stated in class that the strength of the acid and the oxoacid is based on the electronegativity.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:49 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: autoprotolysis equilibrium
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: autoprotolysis equilibrium

A proton transfer reaction between two identical molecules, one acting as a Bronsted acid and the other as a Bronsted base.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Fri Nov 29, 2019 1:41 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Polydentate

A polydentate ligand has multiple lone pair donating sites.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Fri Nov 29, 2019 1:39 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: identifying acids and bases
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: identifying acids and bases

You have to look at the equation as a whole or have it somewhat memorized. By looking at the whole equation, you identify which reactant is the electron donor which means it gains the hydrogen and that would be your lewis base. Then the other reactant has to be an electron acceptor and lose a hydrog...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Fri Nov 29, 2019 1:37 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: cis platinum
Replies: 6
Views: 47

Re: cis platinum

Cisplatin is a chemotherapy drug used to treat cancers.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:35 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxidation states
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: Oxidation states

They are somewhat similar in a sense but the oxidation number deals mainly with the more electronegative atom keeping all the shared electrons while formal charge assumes the electrons are shared evenly.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:32 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Textbook question 9c.5
Replies: 1
Views: 46

Re: Textbook question 9c.5

Take into account the atoms with lone pairs electrons and shapes on the ligands. If all the lone pairs of electrons are on one atom in a ligand, then it is not likely that the ligand will be polydentate. But if the lone pairs of electrons are distributed between different atoms on a ligand, then it ...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:14 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: H3O+
Replies: 11
Views: 333

Re: H3O+

H3O+ has tetrahedral orbital geometry because it is sp3 but has a trigonal pyramidal molecular geometry due to the one lone pair and the 3 atoms.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:51 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Heme complex
Replies: 8
Views: 69

Re: Heme complex

Heme can bind gases and transport them throughout an organism. It can also hold electrons and facilitate reaction in the electron transport chain.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:47 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: d-orbitals
Replies: 7
Views: 44

Re: d-orbitals

D orbitals can get involved in hybridization. When the shape is trigonal bipyramidal it can be sp3d or when its octahedral it can be sp3d2.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:11 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Oxidation states
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: Oxidation states

The oxidation numbers are determined based off the charge of the ion itself. For example if the compound was C2H6, the oxidation number of the H would be +1 and the C is -3 so when you add the total together it would be (1x6)+ (-3x2) which would make the oxidation number of the whole molecule 0.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:41 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: AXE
Replies: 5
Views: 52

Re: AXE

An AXE would have to have linear shape because an AXE is implying that there are only two atoms in the molecule thus not being able to create anything other than linear.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:38 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Dipole

If the molecule is completely symmetric then the dipole moments on each molecule will cancel each other out.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:37 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole Moments
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Dipole Moments

Dipole moment is a quantity that describes two opposite charges separated by some distance. It is the product of the magnitude of the separated charge and the distance of separation.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:33 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Hybridization shortcuts
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Hybridization shortcuts

A shortcut for determining the hybridization of an atom is to : look at the atom; then count the number of atoms connected to it; third, count the number of lone pairs; finally add up the number of atoms and lone pairs to get your hybridization value.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:30 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: linear versus angular
Replies: 5
Views: 37

Re: linear versus angular

To figure out the geometry of the molecule, you have to determine how many lone pairs are existing (if there is any) to help you identify what type of geometry the molecule has.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:27 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Angle for bond
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Angle for bond

I missed the part in lecture about the bond angle value for a tetrahedral arrangement molecule but it has a bent geometry. I know we don't have to know the exact value but what was the range mentioned?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 10, 2019 7:03 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: expanded octet
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: expanded octet

an atom can usually have an expanded octet if it is
beyond period 3. common ones include sulfur, phosphorous, silicon and chlorine
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:31 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Example from lecture
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Example from lecture

Can someone explain the concept from the example that Professor Lavelle used in lecture about the F2 and CL2 gases at room temperature while Br2 is a liquid and I2 is a solid?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:47 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: what is electron distortion?
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: what is electron distortion?

Electron distortion is when electrons are not bound as tightly to the nucleus and each atom has a larger electron cloud and due to this loosely attached electrons, it is easier for them to shift around which causes the electron clouds to become more easily distorted. Ions with high electron distorti...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:39 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: how to determine the energy of a bond
Replies: 6
Views: 50

Re: how to determine the energy of a bond

The energy of a bond is determined by measuring the heat required to break one mole of molecules into their individual atoms.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:38 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Strongest Bond
Replies: 15
Views: 94

Re: Strongest Bond

In terms of bonds in molecules, strongest to weakest is: covalent, ionic, hydrogen, dipole-dipole, london dispersion forces.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:42 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Dilution Equation
Replies: 4
Views: 70

Re: Dilution Equation

If you are only finding the volume after being given volume and the two other molarities, it is not necessary to convert to Liters before solving.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:37 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Dino Nuggets - 12C
Replies: 3
Views: 40

Re: Dino Nuggets - 12C

This is the best resonance structure because O is more electronegative than N and you want to put the least electronegative atom, which would be N, in the center.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:06 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electronegativity vs. Electron Affinity
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: Electronegativity vs. Electron Affinity

Electronegativity is how well an atom can attract electrons to itself while electron affinity is the amount of energy release when an electron is added. Electron affinity increases from left to right because the electrons that are added to the energy levels becomes closer to the nucleus which create...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 03, 2019 12:02 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: general question
Replies: 2
Views: 35

general question

Can someone explain the general concept of polarizability and the trends associated with weaker and stronger polarizing bonds?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 03, 2019 12:00 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal charges on structures
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Formal charges on structures

When creating Lewis structures of lowest energy, do you want the most formal charges to be 0 and if there is a charge forit to be on the element that is the most electronegative?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Nov 03, 2019 12:39 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 5
Views: 42

Re: Formal Charge

You want to calculate formal charge when figuring out the lowest energy lewis structure because this means having the most stable structure. The lower the formal charge for the molecule, the more stable a molecule is.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 27, 2019 9:30 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 1D questions
Replies: 4
Views: 48

Re: 1D questions

Shells encompass both orbitals and subshells and are represented by value of n- principle quantum number. Subshells are within a shell and are represented by s, p, d, and f. Orbitals are within the subshell such as px, py, pz.
L value of 0= s
L value of 1= p
L value of 2= d
L value of 3= d
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lone pair
Replies: 8
Views: 46

Re: Lone pair

Yes you are correct. Lone pairs are just a pair of valence electrons that are not bonded.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:29 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Central Atom
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: Central Atom

The central atom has the lowest ionization energy because having a lower ionization energy means it is easier to lose electrons which makes the bonding easier when bonding with other atoms.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:25 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Difference between electronegativity, ionization energy, and electron affinity
Replies: 5
Views: 39

Re: Difference between electronegativity, ionization energy, and electron affinity

Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron. Electron Affinity is the amount of energy released when an atom gains an electron. Electronegativity is the ability of an atom to attract/ bond an electron to itself.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:21 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure
Replies: 5
Views: 41

Re: Lewis Structure

the sulfate ion can hold more than 8 electrons and if that's the case with any element, you want to be able to fill up the central element first. If you can go further than the octet rule, you would like to create a Lewis structure that contains the better formal charges (more with a formal charge o...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:46 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: h bar
Replies: 2
Views: 39

h bar

Professor Lavelle never used h bar but I saw in the homework that they only used h bar. What is the significance of h bar compared to just h?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 20, 2019 5:15 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Probably a really quick question.
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Probably a really quick question.

Yes you are correct. there are also nodal planes within the orbitals
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 20, 2019 1:09 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Wave Function vs Orbital vs Subshell vs Shell
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Wave Function vs Orbital vs Subshell vs Shell

Wave function is the probability of finding an electron in its wave. Shells encompass both orbitals and subshells and are represented by value of n- principle quantum number. Subshells are within a shell and are represented by s, p, d, and f. Orbitals are within the subshell such as px, py, pz.
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:59 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbital questions
Replies: 1
Views: 28

Orbital questions

To clarufy: For the 3d orbital levels , -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, do they represent dxy, dyz, dzx, dx^2y^2, dz^2?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: 1B 27
Replies: 2
Views: 37

1B 27

A bowling ball of mass 8.00 kg is rolled down a bowling alley lane at 5.00 +/- 5.0 m/s. What is the minimum uncertainty in its position?
What value would you use as the change in uncertainty?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:11 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: QM description
Replies: 2
Views: 30

QM description

In class, it was brought up that electrons have discrete energies with only certain wavelengths allowed inside an atom, what does this relate to? Does it relate to the detectable wavelike properties when de Broglie is greater than 10^-15 m?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:07 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1A 15
Replies: 2
Views: 44

1A 15

In the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen, a line is observed at 102.6 nm. Determine the values of n for the initial and final energy levels of the electron during the emission of energy that leads to this spectral line.
Which specific equation are we supposed to use?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:05 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Series
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Series

Dr. Lavelle was talking about three different series in class. I know there was Lyman and Balmer but what was the third one? and What is the difference between the three?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:01 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Question on 1A 11
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Question on 1A 11

In the spectrum of atomic hydrogen, several lines are generally classified together as belonging to a series. What iscommon to the lines within a series that makes grouping themtogether logical?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:57 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 18

De Broglie Equation

In class on Friday, the De Broglie equation was derived using speed of light so why can't the De Broglie equation be used for light?
by Jamie Lee 1H
Sun Oct 06, 2019 5:57 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Volumetric Analysis
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Volumetric Analysis

You would need to use the equation M1V1= M2V2 for a problem that involves dilution. So for this question, you use the 0.50 M given in part A with and the 100ml converted to 1 L and solve for Vol NaOH
((1.00 L)(0.50M))/0.20 M= 2.5 x 10^2 mL
by Jamie Lee 1H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:32 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Clarification for SI Units
Replies: 4
Views: 63

Re: Clarification for SI Units

Pico, nano, milli, centi, kilo are the common ones used. These are necessary to use when the problems are given in a unit value other than the standard meter, liter, or second. If given in something other than meter, liter, or second then you would use these values to convert them before starting th...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:28 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Fundamentals E1
Replies: 4
Views: 86

Fundamentals E1

Question:The field of nanotechnology offers some intriguing possibilities, such as the creation of fibers one atom wide. Suppose you were able to string together 1.00 mol Ag atoms, each of radius 144 pm, into one of these fibers by encapsulating them in carbon nanotubes.How long would the fiber exte...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:17 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Fundamentals M15
Replies: 3
Views: 44

Re: Fundamentals M15

You first need to start out by writing out a balanced equation from the elements that were given (aluminum metal + Chlorine gas --> aluminum chloride). From there, you would do the same calculations as the other limiting reactant problems to figure out whether chlorine or aluminum is a limiting reac...
by Jamie Lee 1H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 3:14 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: 2 Limiting Reagents
Replies: 5
Views: 58

Re: 2 Limiting Reagents

In regards to your second question, you can not have two limiting reactants because then that means that either there's too little to be used or the ratio of each reactant are being completely used up and in that case, they wouldn't be able to physically limit each other.

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