Search found 50 matches

by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:43 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Coordination Compounds
Replies: 5
Views: 38

Re: Naming Coordination Compounds

I don't think you need to memorize them, but it is probably good if you understand generally how they were named (basically just taking out the ending and putting an o like chloride to chloro)
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:29 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: TEST 2 POLAR molecule
Replies: 6
Views: 44

Re: TEST 2 POLAR molecule

Since it's a tetrahedral molecule and all atoms attached to the central atom are different, they all have different strengths on their pull towards itself, so that is why Cl atoms don't cancel out.
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:18 am
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: 6B.9
Replies: 5
Views: 46

Re: 6B.9

Yeah, your answer is right. You can check because [H3O+] x [OH-] should be equal to 1.0 x 10-14.
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:35 am
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Sig Figs for logarithmic funcitons
Replies: 6
Views: 84

Re: Sig Figs for logarithmic funcitons

When you get the concentration and are trying to solve the pH, you would count how many sig figs the concentration has so for your answer, that would be the amount of numbers after the decimal point in your pH.
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:23 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentates
Replies: 9
Views: 102

Re: Polydentates

A ligand is polydentate when it can occupy more than one binding site simultaneously.
by Michelle Le 1J
Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:05 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Intra vs Inter molecular forces
Replies: 7
Views: 71

Re: Intra vs Inter molecular forces

Intermolecular forces are between molecules and they are the forces of attractions between separate molecules that cause them to form liquids and solids. Intramolecular forces are forces which hold atoms together to form a molecule (like a chemical bond).
by Michelle Le 1J
Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:03 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: ... the dang 9C toolbox LOL
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: ... the dang 9C toolbox LOL

Yeah, if you didn't have the overall charge, you wouldn't be able to find out what Fe's charge is
by Michelle Le 1J
Mon Nov 25, 2019 11:01 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Order of Ligands
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: Order of Ligands

The TM is written first. Then, all the ligands, anion ligands before neutral ligands. If there is more than one anion or neutral ligand, they are written in alphabetical order according to the first letter in their chemical formula.
by Michelle Le 1J
Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:51 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Unhybridized Orbital vs Spin Pair?
Replies: 8
Views: 38

Re: Unhybridized Orbital vs Spin Pair?

I think it's unhybridized orbital because of electrons like to spread out as much as they can before having to be spin paired with another electron, so they will fill up the unhybridized first before they spin pair.
by Michelle Le 1J
Mon Nov 25, 2019 10:38 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: OH2 vs H2O
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: OH2 vs H2O

You wouldn't get marked down, since OH2 makes it more clear in which one has the bond with the central atom.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:46 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 17
Views: 245

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Yeah, you would use arrows to draw the dipole moment for the bonds and then use that to determine the overall dipole moment of the molecule.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:41 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Order of Strength
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Order of Strength

The order from strongest to weakest intermolecular forces is london dispersion forces, dipole-dipole attraction, hydrogen bonding, and then ionic has the strongest intermolecular forces.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:38 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: HCL vs NaCl
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: HCL vs NaCl

Matt Sanruk 4F wrote:So all ionic compounds will have higher imf, boiling and freezing points than any covalent molecule, right?

Yes, ionic compounds have the strongest intermolecular forces compared to the covalent molecules, as well as they generally have higher boiling and melting points.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Nov 20, 2019 9:05 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Hydrogen bonding occurs when there is an attraction between an N, O, or F atom and an H that is in a H-O, H-N, or H-F bond already.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Nov 20, 2019 8:52 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Test 2
Replies: 5
Views: 76

Re: Test 2

The test goes up until pi and sigma bonds, it does not cover coordination compounds.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:47 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Differences in these shapes
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: Differences in these shapes

Yes, a square pyramid is derived from the octahedral shape, and since it just has 1 lone pair, that's why it forms a square pyramid. Trigonal bypramids, on the other hand, do not have any lone pairs.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:41 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: T-shaped vs Trigonal Bipyramidal
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: T-shaped vs Trigonal Bipyramidal

Trigonal bipyramid and t-shape both have a steric number of 5 (basically 5 things around the central atom), but the difference is that trigonal bipyramid is the basic geometry with a steric number of 5, as it has 0 lone pairs, while t-shape has 2, thus that's why its bond angles are approximately 90...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:30 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 8
Views: 66

Re: Bond Angles

I don't think there's any way to calculate it, so you might just have to memorize what bond angles go with each geometric shape. If you google online, there's plenty of vsepr geometry charts that are helpful!
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:28 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity
Replies: 9
Views: 75

Re: Increasing/Decreasing Electronegativity

Basically, Fluorine is the most electronegative element, so it is more electronegative going across and up the periodic table and getting closer to Fluorine.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Nov 14, 2019 10:05 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape Name
Replies: 17
Views: 158

Re: Molecular Shape Name

Jorge Ramirez_4H wrote:What's the difference between linear and I think it was bent?

The difference between the two is their bond angles, with linear it's 180, while with bent it's about 109.5.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Nov 06, 2019 10:17 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 2B.11c
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Re: 2B.11c

Usually the least electronegative atom is in the center, so that's probably why the two carbon atoms are in the center and the nitrogen atom is on the side.
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Nov 05, 2019 2:27 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Midterm Practice 4B
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Re: Midterm Practice 4B

So first you have to use De Broglie's equation to solve for velocity since you can't just use the speed of light equation because the wavelength given is for an electron and not light. Then you would just use the photoelectric effect equation and plug in the values for work function and kinetic ener...
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Nov 05, 2019 2:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 2B.1 c
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Re: 2B.1 c

At the review session, the TA also mentioned that you should also look at the electronegativity to determine the central atom (because of the ionization energy exceptions like N->O and Be->B. The less electronegative atom would be the central atom, so since N is less electronegative than O, it is th...
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Nov 05, 2019 2:09 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing This Equation
Replies: 11
Views: 141

Re: Balancing This Equation

All combustion reactions consist of O2 as one of the reactants and CO2 and H2O as the products. So for this reaction specifically, the reactants are C10H14N2 and O2, and N2, CO2, and H2O would be the products.
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Nov 05, 2019 2:05 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: 2D.13
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: 2D.13

You know that C and O together have a total of 10 valence electrons looking at the periodic table, so that's the maximum number of electrons there should be in your structure. If C and O had a single or double bond, there would be over 10 electrons in the structure (as you need to follow the octet r...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:34 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: D orbital
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: D orbital

If you look at it using the quantum numbers, the D subshell is l=2, therefore ml (the orbitals) is 2,1,0,-1,-2. There are 5 values, meaning that there is a total of 5 orbitals in the D subshell.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:29 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 45

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Ionic bonds are formed when the electronegativity difference is greater than 2. Covalent bonds are formed with the electronegativity difference is less than 1.5.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:18 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic Bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 46

Re: Ionic Bonds

When the electronegativity difference is greater than 2, then it's an ionic bond.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:15 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Resonance
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Resonance

Resonance structures are just different ways of drawing Lewis structures for an ion or molecule, although they are all the same and equal. With that being said, in real life, these alternate structures do not exist since the actual structure is an average of all these structures combined because you...
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:06 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Hw problem 2A.13
Replies: 4
Views: 48

Re: Hw problem 2A.13

So first you would write the electron configuration of the atoms and then by looking at it, you would see which one is the last orbital in what you wrote and the electron in that orbital would be the one you need to remove. So for Zn, which is [Ar]3d104s2, the electron you would be removing is locat...
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:40 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: post module assignment Q 19
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Re: post module assignment Q 19

It's D because even though we use that equation often while trying to solve photoelectric effect-related problems, it is not an equation we use to describe what is going on in the photoelectric effect. D is the equation we use to find either the frequency or wavelength of a photon, as it is the clas...
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:31 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Atomic Radius
Replies: 18
Views: 136

Re: Atomic Radius

No I don't think you need to know exactly how much the atomic radius changes, I would just know and understand the trends as you go down a group and across a period
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:23 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 1D. 23)
Replies: 5
Views: 72

Re: 1D. 23)

When ml is given, that means they already specified what orbital they are talking about, so I believe there is only one orbital.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:18 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Spin Quantum Number
Replies: 6
Views: 48

Re: Spin Quantum Number

The four quantum numbers altogether help to completely describe an electron in an atom and its spin state, thus you would use that number to specify the spin state of a certain electron.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:02 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 1E.13
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: 1E.13

Like how Chromium and Copper are exceptions to the electron configuration rule, Silver deals with the same idea. It's more stable with 10 electrons in the 4d subshell, so it takes one electron from the 5s subshell in order to do so.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 17, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: 1B 23
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: 1B 23

Since you know that a neutron has mass (which can be found on Lavelle's equation sheet), you would use De Brogile's equation to solve for its velocity. Typically, this equation would be used when you have wavelength, velocity, and mass involved in the problem. However, you wouldn't use this when you...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 17, 2019 1:19 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: 1B15
Replies: 3
Views: 60

Re: 1B15

Kinetic energy(Ek) is different than the E in lambda=hc/E, in which E is the energy of the photon. If you remember the equation we learned while learning the photoelectic effect, it was E(photon) -work function= Ek. Because of the work function, E(photon) is not the same thing as Ek, so that's why y...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 17, 2019 1:08 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 1D. 11
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: 1D. 11

There would only be one orbital since ml would be 0 when l=0.
by Michelle Le 1J
Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:39 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Einstein Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: Einstein Equation

Yes, E is the energy for a photon.
by Michelle Le 1J
Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:37 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: 1B.9
Replies: 5
Views: 112

Re: 1B.9

Since they gave you the watts of the lamp, you would convert that to J/s and multiply that by 2 because of the 2 seconds in order to get the Joules. You would just need to find the energy of the photon emitted using E=hc/wavelength and then use that answer (which is in Joules/photon) and multiply th...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 10, 2019 3:08 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: hw question E23?
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: hw question E23?

For CuBr2, since you know that it consists of only one Cu2+ ion by looking at its formula, you would use the conversion factor (1 mol Cu2+/1 mol CuBr2) and multiply that to the mols of CuBr2 to find the moles of ions. If the question were asking about the amount of ions and not its moles, you would ...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:52 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs only for Decimal Points vs for all integers in the Answer
Replies: 5
Views: 72

Re: Sig Figs only for Decimal Points vs for all integers in the Answer

For addition/subtraction, you would round to the nearest decimal point(the one with the smallest number of decimal places) and for multiplication/division, you would round to the least amount of sig figs. In longer calculations, I recommend just keeping as many sig figs as you can throughout your ca...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 10, 2019 2:19 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Experiment
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: Photoelectric Effect Experiment

Think of the light hitting the metal surface as a bunch of photos with an energy that is determined by its frequency. If there's not enough energy (aka the work function), then no electrons would be emitted.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:34 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 4
Views: 72

Re: Work Function

Work function and threshold energy are basically the same thing; it's the minimum energy needed to eject an electron from a certain metal. If the the energy of the light does not meet the threshold energy, then no electrons will be emitted regardless of intensity of light.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 09, 2019 11:21 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Molar Mass
Replies: 7
Views: 96

Re: Molar Mass

You can always use Avogadro's number to convert between atoms, molecules, and (molar mass) grams.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 03, 2019 7:06 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant Calculations Post-Module Assessment
Replies: 3
Views: 66

Re: Limiting Reactant Calculations Post-Module Assessment

You need to convert both reactants from grams to moles, then choosing either one of them and doing the mole to mole ratio with it to see if you have enough or excess of the second reactant. For example, if you were to choose the NH3 to work with, you would take the moles of NH3 you solved for and th...
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:43 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: What is the process for doing L.3 on page F94?
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: What is the process for doing L.3 on page F94?

You would first convert the grams of Li3N to moles, and then use the mole to mole ratio of Li3N to H2 in order to answer part A. Same thing with part B, just you have the moles of LiH already, so you do the mole to mole ratio and then convert the moles of Li3N to grams.
by Michelle Le 1J
Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:38 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs in Mulitstep Problems
Replies: 10
Views: 94

Re: Sig Figs in Mulitstep Problems

Yes, I agree with the previous responses because it doesn't hurt to have more sigfigs than you need during your calculations, but it will mess them up if you accidentally rounded up a number.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 02, 2019 8:52 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Fundamentals Section M Homework M19
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Re: Fundamentals Section M Homework M19

I believe you would have to first do the mass % of each of them and then convert the grams of them into moles in order to find the empirical and molecular formula of caffeine.
by Michelle Le 1J
Wed Oct 02, 2019 11:33 am
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Stoichiometric Coefficients [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 95

Re: Stoichiometric Coefficients [ENDORSED]

If you get a set of coefficients (something like 2H2O = 2H2 + 202), then you would be able to divide since they are all divisible by 2, which would turn it into H2O= H2+02.

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