Search found 51 matches

by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:32 pm
Forum: Industrial Examples
Topic: What do we need to know?
Replies: 15
Views: 312

Re: What do we need to know?

I think knowing the structure/function of cisplatin is most crucial, so I'd study that most and then look over a few industrial/biological examples mentioned in the book.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:29 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Cisplatin function
Replies: 1
Views: 49

Re: Cisplatin function

Cisplatin, being "cis" has the same type of atoms on the same side, which allows it to attach in two places on a DNA molecule. If it was trans and could only bind once, the bond would not be strong enough to block DNA polymerase. Since it is cis, however, it attaches to guanine and is able...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:26 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentates and Chelates
Replies: 4
Views: 101

Re: Polydentates and Chelates

Yep, in order to be a chelate, a ligand must be polydenate so they are more or less interchangeable terms.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:25 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Coordrination Number (Polydentate ligands)
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Coordrination Number (Polydentate ligands)

Some of the ligands that are polydentate affect the coordination number--like (en) and (ox). Are there any other specific examples we should know/memorize before the final?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:07 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: 6C21
Replies: 2
Views: 66

6C21

Can someone explain why on the e and f parts of 6C21, certain elements are replaced with H2O?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:34 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Ionization in Water
Replies: 8
Views: 599

Re: Ionization in Water

Lauren Sanchez 3D wrote:
ryanhon2H wrote:Strong bases fully dissociate in water, while weak bases only partially dissociate, as the strength of the base depends on its ability to fully dissociate.

Is this why the balanced equation for strong acids have a one-way arrow while weak acids have a two-way arrow?


Yep! That's exactly why
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:32 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Calculating pH/Concentration
Replies: 3
Views: 326

Re: Calculating pH/Concentration

Yes, I think it would be good to practice this for the final because a lot of the questions usually require a bit of critical thinking that extends beyond the homework problems. Would be nice if someone could do an example of this type of calculation :)
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:27 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugate/Bronsted/Lewis
Replies: 2
Views: 45

Conjugate/Bronsted/Lewis

What is the difference between describing something as a conjugate base, a bronsted base, or a Lewis base?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:25 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphoteric Compound
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Amphoteric Compound

What is an example of a well-known amphoteric compound?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:23 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Textbook
Replies: 5
Views: 74

Re: Textbook

The textbook first introduces acids/bases in the fundamentals section J and then delves into it more deeply in chapter 6
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Nov 20, 2019 5:21 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2F15
Replies: 4
Views: 100

Re: 2F15

Oh, I didn't realize s-character was interchangeable with p-character. That makes much more sense. Thank you!
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Nov 20, 2019 5:17 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Cisplatin
Replies: 4
Views: 88

Re: Cisplatin

This website gives a more simplistic description of cisplatin to help start to understand why the structure of cisplatin helps to kill cancer cells. Hope it helps!
https://www.netdoctor.co.uk/medicines/c ... cisplatin/
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Nov 20, 2019 5:12 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Compounds (general question)
Replies: 5
Views: 102

Re: Naming Compounds (general question)

I hope not, and Lavelle made it seem like we won't really need to even though some of the homework problems require naming. Though, if we are provided the table that is in the book (9C.1), it is relatively easy to figure out the name of a compound.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Nov 20, 2019 5:07 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Polydentate

Can someone explain how to determine whether or not a ligand is polydentate? Does it always involve drawing out the full compound to see where lone pairs are present?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Nov 20, 2019 4:04 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2F15
Replies: 4
Views: 100

2F15

Why does the bond angle increase as the s-character of the hybrid increase?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: C2H4
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: C2H4

Though C2H4 is a chain, in doing VSEPR models, you have to treat each carbon as the central atom. Each carbon would have 3 areas of electron density (all bonds), making it trigonal planar, which has bond angles of 120 degrees. Hope this helps :)
by Maeve Miller 1A
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:49 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: T shape
Replies: 7
Views: 79

Re: T shape

T shape occurs in AX3E2--when an electronically geometric trigonal bipyramidal molecule has 2 lone pairs, leaving it T shaped with bond angles of 90 and 180 degrees.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape v Electron Geometry
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: Molecular Shape v Electron Geometry

Electron geometry is in reference to the number of regions of electron density and what that shape entails, while molecular shape takes into account lone pairs and how that effects the shape of the molecule. For example, in cases of AX2E2, the electron geometry is tetrahedral, while the molecular sh...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 5
Views: 74

Re: Bond Angles

I think we will need to know the shape as well as the bond angles; we won't necessarily need to know the exact bond angle (in cases where lone pairs are present), but we will need to know an approximation (i.e. <109.5 in cases of trigonal pyramidal shape).
by Maeve Miller 1A
Fri Nov 15, 2019 7:34 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Notation used in VSEPR
Replies: 8
Views: 105

Re: Notation used in VSEPR

Yes, since it was covered during lecture and is used in the book/homework, I'm assuming it is something we need to know.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:11 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Solids, Liquids and Gases
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Solids, Liquids and Gases

I agree with the person above me; this is typically a pretty good rule. However, stackability of molecules also plays into whether or not they are solid at a given temperature. Stackability is a result of the structure of a molecule--rectangular is better for stacking.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:06 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: electron cloud distortion
Replies: 3
Views: 145

Re: electron cloud distortion

As the person above me mentioned, electron cloud distortion is the polarization of a molecule. The smaller, highly positive atom they are talking about is usually a cation, which has the "polarizing power" as we have discussed in class. The smaller and more highly charged the molecule, the...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 4:02 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond Length Trends
Replies: 4
Views: 104

Re: Bond Length Trends

This is only true if a structure has resonance (where you could move the double/triple bond to multiple locations) because this is where the resonance hybrid is. In other instances, the lengths of bonds would be more reflective of the type of bond as well as the size of the atoms involved.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:59 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Week 7 Homework
Replies: 15
Views: 226

Re: Week 7 Homework

I just did problems in the 3F section since they were not covered before the midterm.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 3:55 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Types of Interactions
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Re: Types of Interactions

Hi! I would say we are mostly focusing on those as well as Van Der Waals (induced dipole-induced dipole) since that is what the homework mostly covers.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:54 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity vs. Electron Affinity
Replies: 7
Views: 93

Re: Electronegativity vs. Electron Affinity

Electronegativity is the strength of the pull certain elements have on electrons--as the person above me said, how "greedy" they are. Electron affinity, however, is the energy released when an electron is added to a gas-phase atom. Both, however, follow the same trends on the periodic tabl...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:51 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Why do all of the bonds have the same length regardless of double/single bonds in a resonance structure?
Replies: 4
Views: 68

Re: Why do all of the bonds have the same length regardless of double/single bonds in a resonance structure?

They are all the same length because it is more of a hybridization. In drawing Lewis structures, we draw single and double bonds to simplify things and make them visually clear; in real life, however, bonds do not work this way--they would all be of the same length as Dr. Lavelle talked about during...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:49 am
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Double bond
Replies: 15
Views: 200

Re: Double bond

You typically use a double bond in your lewis structure to get the formal charge of an element to zero. For instance, oxygen often likes to double bond because the calculation FC=V-(L+s/2) would be 0=6-(4+4/2), stabilizing the molecule. Oxygen does not always double bond; this was just an example to...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:46 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Central atom
Replies: 8
Views: 139

Re: Central atom

Ideally, you'd want all the elements within the atom to have a formal charge of zero because it would make it extremely stable. However, this is not always the case, and it is best to make the overall charge neutral.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Thu Oct 31, 2019 9:44 am
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Coordinate covalent bond?
Replies: 12
Views: 705

Re: Coordinate covalent bond?

A coordinate covalent bond is a bond in which the 2 shared e- come from one element alone; this is different from a typical covalent bond in that e- often come from multiple elements. In this scenario, there is a donor (a Lewis base) and an accepter (a Lewis acid). Hope this helps!
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: FC in lecture
Replies: 4
Views: 80

Re: FC in lecture

Delocalization refers to the electrons being more spread out; since they are no longer repelling one another, they have a lower energy level and therefor are more stable.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:29 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: electron affinity
Replies: 6
Views: 254

Re: electron affinity

shouse1f wrote:are electron affinity and electronegativity related?


Yes, because a higher electron negativity means a greater affinity for electrons. Moreover, both follow the same periodic trends.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:27 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Exceptions
Replies: 3
Views: 63

Re: Exceptions

H, He, Li, and B are exceptions to the rule because they only fill an s-orbital valence shell, which fits 2--not 8 electrons.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:20 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 9
Views: 114

Re: Orbitals

Yes, you would because you need to remove electrons from the farthest orbital/valence shell.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sun Oct 27, 2019 10:14 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Equal Bond Length
Replies: 4
Views: 64

Re: Equal Bond Length

The structures have equal bond length because of resonance blending; we give the structures a single or double bond to simplify it. However, the real structure is an average of all the possibilities where each bond is the same length.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:41 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Units for E [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 148

Re: Units for E [ENDORSED]

Yes, energy is measured in joules (E); for most problems, you'll answer with J/photon, but in problems asking for the energy per atom, you'll need to multiply by Avogadro's number and answer in J/atom.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:35 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Quantum Numbers
Replies: 2
Views: 72

Re: Quantum Numbers

n represents the principle quantum number (ex. in 2p n=2) l represents the angular momentum quantum number; when l=0, it's in the s-orbital; l=1 p-orbital; l=2 d-orbital; l=3 f-orbital ml represents the magnetic quantum number (which would tell you if it's in an x, y, or z orbital) ms represents the...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:30 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: 1B 15 Part C
Replies: 4
Views: 97

Re: 1B 15 Part C

In response to the comment above, for part a, you would first convert the given velocity to m/s. Then, using the λ=h/(mv) equation, (where h is Planck's constant, m is mass of the e-, and v is velocity) you will be able to find the wavelength. Remember to convert the mass into kg as well! For part b...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:24 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: What is the function of blackbodies?
Replies: 2
Views: 143

Re: What is the function of blackbodies?

I think the purpose of Dr. Lavelle discussing black bodies in class was just so we know they exist; it is likely a topic that will come up again in succeeding chemistry classes but not 14A. Don't stress :)
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 16, 2019 6:23 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW 1B15
Replies: 1
Views: 57

HW 1B15

Hi, guys! Does anyone know why you can't use the c=λv equation to derive the wavelength for part (c)? In the solutions manual, they add together the energy put in (hv) to the energy that is leaving (1/2mv^2) and then use those to find the wavelength, but I'm confused as to why that is a necessary st...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:06 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Quantum Levels
Replies: 9
Views: 110

Re: Quantum Levels

I assume their must be a limit since it cannot rise to necessarily any value, and, as the person above me mentioned, at some point the electron would be so far from the nucleus it might fall off; however, Dr. Lavelle never suggested their was a limit, and you shouldn't need to know this for the home...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:59 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Lyman and Balmer Series
Replies: 4
Views: 90

Re: Lyman and Balmer Series

The Lynman and Balmer series can be seen on the light emission spectrum; the Lynman series refers to when electrons fall to energy level n=1, and the Balmer series refers to when electrons fall to energy level n=2. You can see this on the chart he provided on the slide by seeing which line the arrow...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:54 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave Properties of electrons
Replies: 7
Views: 111

Re: Wave Properties of electrons

Diffraction, at least in my experience, is something more discussed in physics, but it refers to the spreading of light as it passes through a narrow space--like we were discussing during the photoelectric effect lecture. The pattern of light particles he drew on the board after having passed throug...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:51 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: electronegativity
Replies: 10
Views: 2528

Re: electronegativity

Not necessarily; electronegativity refers to the strength of the "pull" an element has on electrons; the more full the valence shell of the element is, the less electronegative it is.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:47 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Mass of Protons, Neutrons, Electrons, Etc.
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: Mass of Protons, Neutrons, Electrons, Etc.

The masses of the subatomic particles are listed in the back of our textbook, so you can use that for homework; those constants should be provided on any assessment
by Maeve Miller 1A
Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:44 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: work function clarification
Replies: 4
Views: 65

Re: work function clarification

Yes, a work function can also be termed threshold energy, which represents the energy used to remove an e- from a metal surface :)
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 7:15 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Chemical unit vs. Formula unit
Replies: 6
Views: 130

Re: Chemical unit vs. Formula unit

Usually in the homework when it asks you to convert to formula units, it requires you to multiply by Avogadro's constant (6.022 * 10^23) in order to get molecules. I found this to be the case for the assigned problems in the E section of fundamentals.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 7:11 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Unit Conversions
Replies: 11
Views: 219

Re: Unit Conversions

You typically convert moles to atoms by multiplying by Avogadro's constant (6.022 * 10^23). You can also use this when the problem asks you to convert to formula units.
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 7:06 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant figures when there are constants
Replies: 3
Views: 82

Re: Significant figures when there are constants

In this case, would you round all throughout the problem or continue with exact numbers and round at the end to get 4 sig figs?
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 7:00 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: HW M19
Replies: 2
Views: 40

Re: HW M19

In order to calculate the empirical formula (and eventually the molecular formula), you will need to divide the mass of each element by is molar mass (in g*mol^-1) to attain the number of moles; then, divide each number by the smallest to get the molecular ratio. If the ratio is not in integers, you...
by Maeve Miller 1A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 6:44 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Homework 2
Replies: 7
Views: 107

Homework 2

Hi, guys! So our first homework assignment (review on fundamentals) is due during lecture this Friday, October 4th, but the rest are to be turned in during discussion sessions. Does that mean our second homework will be due by our first discussion next week (i.e. 10/8 for 1A) or the week following (...

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