Search found 107 matches

by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:06 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: intermediate
Replies: 22
Views: 397

Re: intermediate

Since an intermediate cancels out, you wouldn't write it in the final balanced equation.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:05 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Units for reaction rates
Replies: 9
Views: 210

Re: Units for reaction rates

And since the units for reaction rates are always molarity/ time, this will help you find out the k units.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:04 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: kinetics
Replies: 9
Views: 44

Re: kinetics

It's probably wouldn't occur without a catalyst.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:02 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Kinetic vs thermodynamics
Replies: 3
Views: 20

Re: Kinetic vs thermodynamics

Kinetics is all about the rate. It involves activation energy, and rate constants, but thermodynamics has to do with Gibbs, entropy, enthalpy, and heat.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 15, 2020 10:00 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Solving for rates
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: Solving for rates

The molar ratio, right?
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 11:10 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Time Conversions
Replies: 9
Views: 365

Re: Time Conversions

So, it doesn't matter seconds or minutes as long as you have all the same units.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 11:04 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: rate constants
Replies: 19
Views: 103

Re: rate constants

Rate constants are always positive because concentrations are always positive.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 11:00 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: Rate Law
Replies: 4
Views: 251

Re: Rate Law

I don't think he would test us on it, but he probably wants us to have a vague idea of how to do it.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:54 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: zero, first, and second order
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Re: zero, first, and second order

It helps determine the rate of reactions.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:51 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: first order
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Re: first order

A first order reactions only requires one molecule of one type, where a second order reaction needs two molecules colliding.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:49 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: first order reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Re: first order reactions

So, that's why third order reactions are rare. It's uncommon for three molecules to collide simulataneously.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Fri Mar 06, 2020 10:47 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Half Lives
Replies: 3
Views: 59

Re: Half Lives

You can think of it AS 2^-X, X being each half life. So two half lives is 2^-2, or 1/4
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:37 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: When to add H+ or H20
Replies: 19
Views: 133

Re: When to add H+ or H20

It really depends if the solution is acidic, basic, or neutral
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:36 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Redox Reactions and Acid/Base Reactions
Replies: 9
Views: 43

Re: Redox Reactions and Acid/Base Reactions

Redox reactions change the oxidation numbers
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:34 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: H+ or H2O
Replies: 9
Views: 70

Re: H+ or H2O

Yeah, it really depends if the solution is neutral, basic, or acidic.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:32 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Anode and Cathode
Replies: 9
Views: 67

Re: Anode and Cathode

The more positive electronic potential will be at the reduction reaction, which will be in the cathode
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Mar 01, 2020 6:28 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Anode and Cathode
Replies: 8
Views: 50

Re: Anode and Cathode

If you're given a diagram, the left is the anode and the right it the cathode. If you aren't given a diagram, the greater electric potential is at the cathode.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:00 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: salt bridge
Replies: 9
Views: 41

Re: salt bridge

It makes sure that the flow in the cell continues.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:55 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Test 2
Replies: 9
Views: 56

Re: Test 2

It was just moved from week 8 to week 9
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:54 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Work
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Work

So if it's losing energy to the surroundings, work is negative, while if the system is gaining energy, it is positive.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 23, 2020 9:51 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation Numbers/States
Replies: 8
Views: 50

Re: Oxidation Numbers/States

Yeah, you need to know the general oxidation states to see what's happening with the half reactions
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:35 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Work Equation
Replies: 6
Views: 53

Re: Work Equation

It depends if it's reversible.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:32 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Reversible vs Irreversible
Replies: 7
Views: 58

Re: Reversible vs Irreversible

Yes, there are different equations to use based on if it's reversible or irreversible.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:31 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: State functions
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: State functions

Just remember that heat and work are not state functions, most things are.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:30 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta U
Replies: 5
Views: 36

Re: Delta U

Delta U is zero because there is no potential energy because it's an ideal gas, and no kinetic energy because delta t is zero.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:25 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Equilibrium Constant
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Re: Equilibrium Constant

Since Q is K at equilibrium, when delta g is at zero, k is used.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:20 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Midterm Curve
Replies: 45
Views: 334

Re: Midterm Curve

Only the whole class is curved
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:11 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Using Cv and Cp
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Using Cv and Cp

Cv is for constant volume and Cp is for constant pressure, yes.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:09 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Intensive vs. Extensive
Replies: 15
Views: 85

Re: Intensive vs. Extensive

Intensive properties do not rely on the amount of substance.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:06 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Writing balanced equation for formation reactions
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Writing balanced equation for formation reactions

If the equation asks for one mole its alright to put fractions in front for the coefficients.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:06 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Reversible Reactions vs. Irreversible Reactions
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: Reversible Reactions vs. Irreversible Reactions

The reversible is curved and downscoping, and the irreversible graphs are straight. It shows how less work is done for the irreversible processes.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:03 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Ideal Gas Internal Energy
Replies: 4
Views: 23

Re: Ideal Gas Internal Energy

It's an approximation for the heat capacity of a molecule.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:02 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Reversible or Irreversible
Replies: 5
Views: 29

Re: Reversible or Irreversible

Yeah, the problem should give you some sort of information.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:19 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Phase change
Replies: 20
Views: 76

Re: Phase change

It would be positive, because it requires energy to cause the phase change.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:17 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Work
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: Work

It all depends on the system and the surroundings, and what is doing work on what. Whatever is doing the work will have negative work and vise versa.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:16 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: pressure v. volume
Replies: 3
Views: 18

Re: pressure v. volume

As long as there isn't any work being put in, delta u=delta h
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:15 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Definition of First Law
Replies: 9
Views: 31

Re: Definition of First Law

It's just the one that states the conservation of energy.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Feb 02, 2020 7:14 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta U = Q
Replies: 8
Views: 30

Re: Delta U = Q

The work is zero when there is no expansion in volume or change in pressure, because otherwise it would affect the internal energy.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:28 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Calculation methods
Replies: 6
Views: 26

Re: Calculation methods

The second method uses averages, so it's the least accurate.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:28 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Heat Capacity
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Heat Capacity

So, can you convert between specific and molar heat capacity?
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:26 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Bond Enthalpy Method
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: Bond Enthalpy Method

Yes, Hess's Law should be the most accurate, it doesn't rely on averages
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:24 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: State Function
Replies: 7
Views: 38

Re: State Function

Anything that isn't dependent on the path is a state function
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:23 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Expansion
Replies: 5
Views: 28

Re: Expansion

Expanding the container would shift the reaction based on the amount of product or reactant, but with overall change, the Keq would remain unchanged.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:21 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Which liquids to use
Replies: 7
Views: 37

Re: Which liquids to use

For solving equilibrium constants, you usually just use aqueous compounds or gaseous ones
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:15 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Excess Reactant in Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 6
Views: 36

Re: Excess Reactant in Le Chatelier's Principle

The reactants have to be in excess, because Le Chatlier's Principle is based on a reaction in equilibrium, and so it's still going on.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:13 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Effect of Inert Gases
Replies: 9
Views: 44

Re: Effect of Inert Gases

Inert gases are relatively stable, and so they don't usually have an effect on the reaction.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:11 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: What is this?
Replies: 23
Views: 197

Re: What is this?

It just shows how a reaction shifts to maintain stability
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Tue Jan 14, 2020 2:08 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Change on Same Side
Replies: 6
Views: 41

Re: Change on Same Side

It affects it by making the products more favorable, using up more H2.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:48 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: R constant in PV=nRT
Replies: 9
Views: 51

Re: R constant in PV=nRT

For homework though the one on the equation sheet should work
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:46 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Nitrogen gas
Replies: 5
Views: 254

Re: Nitrogen gas

Is that because it's relatively stable?
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:45 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: K
Replies: 10
Views: 65

Re: K

It will be the same, because even if you use partial pressure instead of concentration, you would still be able to convert between the two.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:44 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Understanding Q
Replies: 19
Views: 107

Re: Understanding Q

They're solved exactly the same way.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Thu Jan 09, 2020 11:44 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: K and Q
Replies: 13
Views: 70

Re: K and Q

K is when the reaction is at equilibrium. Q is at all other points in the reaction, and can be used to show which direction the reaction is proceeding.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:44 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Are noble gases considered bases?
Replies: 8
Views: 922

Re: Are noble gases considered bases?

Noble gases are usually unreactive, so they're unlikely to give up electrons or accept them.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: buffer solutions
Replies: 5
Views: 57

Re: buffer solutions

Yeah, he said that we really only need to now how to calculate for strong acids.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:41 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: how to figure out?
Replies: 12
Views: 113

Re: how to figure out?

The conjugate base is what is left after the acid gives off a proton.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:40 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: bronsted base and acid
Replies: 4
Views: 66

Re: bronsted base and acid

So, the lewis definition is concerned with electrons while the Bronsted definition is involving protons.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:38 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Oxoacid Strength
Replies: 6
Views: 92

Re: Oxoacid Strength

Okay, that makes sense. So, when concerning bond lengths, it's the comparison between hydrogen and another atom.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Dec 07, 2019 10:35 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphiprotic
Replies: 7
Views: 72

Re: Amphiprotic

Water is an example of this.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:48 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Formation of coordinate covalent bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Formation of coordinate covalent bonds

So, the number of coordination compounds depends on the number of bonds that the transition metal will make to neutralize the charge.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:45 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Drawing Structures
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Re: Drawing Structures

Yeah, we just draw the lewis structure like we always have
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:43 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Sphere
Replies: 5
Views: 46

Re: Coordination Sphere

So water would be outside of the coordination sphere?
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:41 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Central atom?
Replies: 5
Views: 56

Re: Central atom?

Okay, that makes sense
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Numbers
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Coordination Numbers

Yeah, so to tell the coordination number you have to see the number of bonds, but I think you can predict it based on the number of bonds it is able to form.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:33 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: regions of electron density
Replies: 10
Views: 55

Re: regions of electron density

Recognizing regions of electron density does give an idea of the general shape, but the actual atoms give it a name.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: Lone Pairs

Lone pairs are regions of electron density, so it does need to be taken into consideration. Like an atom with two attached atoms and no lone pairs will be linear, but if a lone pair was added, it would become bent.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:28 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Dipole moments
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Re: Dipole moments

Yeah, the arrow points towards the more electronegative atom
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: Can there be lone pairs on the central atom if the shape is linear?

If you just had two atoms attached with two lone pairs, it would end up being bent, as the lone pairs wouldn't be able to just be opposite of each other. It would end up looking like a water molecule.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: Bond Angles

You don't need to know the exact angle in these cases, just if it's less or more than the expected angle.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:18 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal charge
Replies: 16
Views: 104

Re: Formal charge

More electronegative atoms can have a negative formal charge if you need to give them one.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:17 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: formal charge
Replies: 7
Views: 61

Re: formal charge

You really only need to do it when they ask for it. But you should when drawing resonance structures just so you can find out if it's more stable.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:16 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Shortcut for Formal Charge
Replies: 14
Views: 157

Re: Shortcut for Formal Charge

Just think about the number of lone electrons and the number of lines.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:15 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: central atom
Replies: 21
Views: 141

Re: central atom

Yes, the central atom should have a zero charge
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:14 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 9
Views: 80

Re: Formal Charge

If the compound has no charge, then the formal charge should be zero.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Nov 10, 2019 8:13 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Calculating formal charge
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: Calculating formal charge

Valence electrons just show how many bonds can be formed, while formal charge shows the bonds.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:00 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Drawing Lewis Structures
Replies: 4
Views: 39

Re: Drawing Lewis Structures

If there are multiple places you can place the double bond, that shows resonance. But you'll want to limit the formal charges on each atom.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Shells
Replies: 3
Views: 68

Re: Expanded Shells

Yeah, it becomes the 18-electron rule to reach a noble gas configuration
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:54 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Exceptions to the Octet
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: Exceptions to the Octet

Only a few elements really need to form an octet, because after that you reach the d-orbital, the 18-electron rule becomes apparent
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:51 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: central atom
Replies: 16
Views: 178

Re: central atom

It's the least electronegative because it's the one that can form the most bonds
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:49 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 6
Views: 92

Re: Midterm

I think he said it wouldn't be on the midterm because we hadn't covered it in lecture
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:48 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 6
Views: 48

Re: Electron Affinity

Okay, that makes more sense.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:47 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization energy
Replies: 12
Views: 134

Re: Ionization energy

All you're really supposed to know for Ionization Energies is the trends for lewis structures later.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:46 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Central Atom
Replies: 13
Views: 74

Re: Central Atom

Just put the ones that are more left and more down as the central atom, as they have lower ionization energies.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: F orbital
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Re: F orbital

Yeah, I think my TA said the same thing
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 27, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electronegativity vs. Electron affinity
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Re: Electronegativity vs. Electron affinity

Yes, electron negativity is the ability to attract paired electrons, while electron affinity is the energy used when an electron is added.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:07 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Overlapping
Replies: 4
Views: 57

Re: Overlapping

Okay, that makes more sense
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:04 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Shell, Subshell, Orbital Terminology
Replies: 8
Views: 116

Re: Shell, Subshell, Orbital Terminology

n is just the energy level of the electron, the principal quantum number, and sort of shows the size of the orbital
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:58 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Inner e- and Outer e-
Replies: 14
Views: 102

Re: Inner e- and Outer e-

The outer electrons feel less of an electrostatic attraction, they're shielded by the inner ones from the nucleus.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: N levels
Replies: 8
Views: 71

Re: N levels

Yeah, the n-levels are just the energy levels that an electron can jump or fall to
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:50 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Mass of electron and photon
Replies: 5
Views: 71

Re: Mass of electron and photon

The mass of an electron should be given, but it's 9.109* 10^-31 kg for an electron
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:48 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Unit for Wavelength
Replies: 34
Views: 209

Re: Unit for Wavelength

The general unit is meters, but it wavelength can usually be put in nanometers
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:29 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Large Objects
Replies: 7
Views: 74

Re: Large Objects

So, bigger objects have a wavelength way smaller than 10^-15, so they're not detectable according to de Broglie's equation.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:28 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Rydberg constant
Replies: 7
Views: 71

Re: Rydberg constant

So, when we use the equation, we end by doing Ef-Ei?
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: difference between Rydberg equation and De Broglie equation
Replies: 5
Views: 60

Re: difference between Rydberg equation and De Broglie equation

Okay, that makes sense. So, de Broglie's equation shows the relationship of the wavelength, mass, and velocity of a small particle, and Rydberg predicts the energy of an electron moving between energy levels, but only for hydrogen.
by Abigail_Hagen2G
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:21 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: wavelike properties
Replies: 4
Views: 43

Re: wavelike properties

When it says measurable wavelike properties, it just means that it's not smaller than 10^-15, because that's not detectable.

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