Search found 61 matches

by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:29 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Reaction Quotient Units
Replies: 10
Views: 26

Re: Reaction Quotient Units

Q is calculated like K and is a ratio, so it would be not have units.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:34 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5.33
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: 5.33

Because the reaction is endothermic, it favors the formation of the product, X.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Jan 14, 2020 5:30 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5j #11
Replies: 2
Views: 7

Re: 5j #11

Endothermic reactions favor the formation of products.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:58 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: concentrations
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: concentrations

Increasing the concentration of reactants will cause more products to be formed in order to maintain equilibrium. The ratio of products to reactants does not change.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:41 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: volume's effect on K
Replies: 7
Views: 24

Re: volume's effect on K

Yes, K does not change.

A decrease in volume with more moles of gas on the reactant side will cause the reaction to produce more products.
A decrease in volume with more moles of gas on the product side will cause the reaction to produce more reactants.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:43 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Textbook question 5I.13
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Textbook question 5I.13

For part c, Cl2 is more stable than F2 because it has a smaller equilibrium constant.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:35 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Units of Pressure
Replies: 8
Views: 37

Re: Units of Pressure

I don't think we will have to memorize the conversions between units of pressure. If we do have to convert them, they should be on the constants and equations sheet.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Jan 11, 2020 12:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Table Calculations
Replies: 4
Views: 13

Re: ICE Table Calculations

You can simplify the expression if it is a cubic function and K is small.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:16 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Small "x" approximations for cubic equations
Replies: 3
Views: 18

Re: Small "x" approximations for cubic equations

I think it was K<10^-4.
K<10^-3 is used to determine that equilibrium favors the reactants.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:03 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: predicting effects
Replies: 8
Views: 22

Re: predicting effects

Removing some of the product will cause the reaction to make more product in order to reach equilibrium again.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:36 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Porphyrin ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Porphyrin ligands

Iron bound to a porphyrin ligand forms a heme complex, which is a component of myoglobin.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Dec 03, 2019 1:27 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: conjugation
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: conjugation

It lowers the energy of the molecule, and the molecule has alternating single and double bonds.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:41 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Iron vs Ferrate
Replies: 5
Views: 25

Re: Iron vs Ferrate

You use ferrate if the compound is an anion. You use iron if the compound is neutral or a cation.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:32 am
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen bound to hemoglobin?
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen bound to hemoglobin?

The affinity of CO binding to hemoglobin is stronger than the affinity between O2 and hemoglobin.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:24 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: cations
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: cations

The coordination sphere includes the central metal cation that the ligands attach to.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:56 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: en and edta
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: en and edta

en is ethylenediamine or NH2CH2CH2NH2. It is on the chart that Dr. Lavelle gave us for naming coordination compounds.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Coordination Compounds and Chemotherapy Drugs
Replies: 5
Views: 48

Re: Coordination Compounds and Chemotherapy Drugs

He talked about cisplatin or cis-diammine-dichloro-platinum(II).
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:22 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Coordinate covalent bond
Replies: 1
Views: 15

Re: Coordinate covalent bond

A coordinate covalent bond is when a lone pair of electrons from one atom is shared with another atom.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Complex
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Complex

A complex consists of a central metal ion that ligands attach to through coordinate covalent bonds.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:53 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Coordination compounds vs complexes
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Coordination compounds vs complexes

A complex consists of a central metal ion that ligands attach to through coordinate covalent bonds. A coordination compound consists of at least one complex. However, I have also seen these two used interchangeably.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 23, 2019 1:20 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelate
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: Chelate

It forms a ring when two or more of the atoms of the ligand bind to a central metal atom.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 23, 2019 1:11 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Sphere
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Coordination Sphere

A coordination sphere is a central atom with ligands bonded to it.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 23, 2019 12:28 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 4
Views: 22

Re: Polydentate

A polydentate ligand is a ligand that has multiple atoms with lone pairs that can be used to bond to a central metal atom.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 23, 2019 12:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Order
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: Naming Order

I think ligands are listed in alphabetical order.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Fri Nov 22, 2019 8:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C.7
Replies: 1
Views: 16

Re: 9C.7

Look at the arrangement of the amine groups. Only b would allow for the two amine groups to bond to the same metal center.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:04 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 12
Views: 75

Re: Polarity

Dipole-dipole is the interaction between the partially positive end of a polar molecule and the partially negative end of another polar molecule.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:50 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: A different way
Replies: 8
Views: 104

Re: A different way

That is probably the most efficient way because limiting reactant problems often ask for the theoretical yield of the product.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:29 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 9
Views: 64

Re: Formal Charge

Oxygen with two bonds has a formal charge of 0.
Nitrogen with three bonds has a formal charge of 0.
Carbon with four bonds has a formal charge of 0.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:07 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Question
Replies: 17
Views: 131

Re: Question

505106414 wrote:Can someone explain the exception for oxygen and nitrogen? It was on the midterm and I got it wrong.

Nitrogen has 3 e- in its p orbital. Oxygen has 4 e- in its p orbital, which results in an electron pair. The electron-electron repulsion from this pair causes a lower ionization energy.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:51 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Re: Polarity

A molecule with a dipole moment is polar. A molecule with no dipole moment is nonpolar.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:25 am
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarisability
Replies: 4
Views: 20

Re: Polarisability

An atom is polarizable if it has a larger radius and less electronegativity.

Polarizing power is the ability of a cation to distort an anion by pulling electrons away from the anion. Polarizability is the ability to pull those electrons toward the anion.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:08 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Ionization Energy vs. Electronegativity
Replies: 9
Views: 44

Re: Ionization Energy vs. Electronegativity

Ionization energy is minimum amount of energy needed to remove an electron from a neutral atom. Electronegativity is a measure of an atom's tendency to attract a pair of electrons. Both ionization energy and electronegativity generally increase as you go left to right on the periodic table and as yo...
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Nov 10, 2019 3:54 am
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dissociation Energy
Replies: 9
Views: 35

Re: Dissociation Energy

Dissociation energies are always positive because energy is absorbed in order to break the bond.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Dino Nugs 12b
Replies: 5
Views: 41

Re: Dino Nugs 12b

The negative charge would be on the electronegative atom, and because oxygen is more electronegative than chlorine, it is more stable if oxygen has a formal charge of -1.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:50 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Atoms to Moles
Replies: 6
Views: 95

Re: Atoms to Moles

You would divide it by Avogadro's constant.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Delocalized electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Delocalized electrons

They are delocalized because they move between two atoms instead of staying with one atom.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:40 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: initial and final variables
Replies: 4
Views: 67

Re: initial and final variables

I would say just read the question carefully. Identify what it's asking you to find and see what information is already given.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:21 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Lewis Structure for Ionic Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 35

Re: Lewis Structure for Ionic Bonds

I believe it goes around the one with the overall charge.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 27, 2019 1:05 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 2A.15
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: 2A.15

Gallium has 3 valence electrons, so it is more likely to lose those 3 electrons than to gain 5 electrons.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 27, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 2A.3
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: 2A.3

The ground state electron configuration for Ru is [Kr]4d^7 5s^1. However, because it is asking for Ru3+, you would need to remove 3 electrons, leaving you with [Kr]4d^5.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 27, 2019 12:48 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 2.A.17
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: 2.A.17

I find the number of valence electrons for the element. Then, I subtract the value of the positive charge from the number of valence electrons.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 27, 2019 12:07 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Angstroms and Atomic Radii
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Angstroms and Atomic Radii

1 Angstrom = 10^-10 m
Angstroms are the units for measuring the atomic radius.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:43 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Pauli Exclusion Principle
Replies: 3
Views: 20

Re: Pauli Exclusion Principle

The s sublevel has 1 orbital, so it can have a max of 2 e-. The p sublevel has 3 orbitals, so it can have a max of 6 e-. The d sublevel has 5 orbitals, so it can have a max of 10 e-. The f sublevel has 7 orbitals, so it can have a max of 14 e-.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:13 am
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: wavefunctions & orbitals relationship?
Replies: 5
Views: 66

Re: wavefunctions & orbitals relationship?

Wave functions are the mathematical representation of orbitals.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:06 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Purpose of the Equation
Replies: 9
Views: 49

Re: Purpose of the Equation

If the position is more precise, the momentum is more uncertain. If the momentum is more precise, the position is more uncertain. The equation calculates this uncertainty.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 11:32 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 1D.26
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: 1D.26

1p cannot exist because the n=1 shell only has s orbitals.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 1:42 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Paired vs Parallel electrons
Replies: 5
Views: 21

Re: Paired vs Parallel electrons

Paired electrons have opposite spins while parallel electrons have the same spin.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 1:34 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: SI Units
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: SI Units

The wavelength would need to be in meters, but the mass of the neutron can stay in kg because that is the SI unit for mass.

Also, 1 J = 1 kg*m^2*s^-2, so the units would cancel out leaving you with m/s for your final answer.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 1:13 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Midterm

I think it covers chemical bonding as well.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 3:04 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: When to apply Sig Figs
Replies: 6
Views: 50

Re: When to apply Sig Figs

Sig figs should be applied to the final answer because rounding during your calculations could affect your results.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:17 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic spectra
Replies: 1
Views: 17

Re: Atomic spectra

I believe elements can only have line spectrums because electrons have specific energy levels. When electrons go down an energy level after being excited, they release a specific wavelength of light.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 1:20 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Pronlem 1B.19 help
Replies: 1
Views: 35

Re: Pronlem 1B.19 help

The mass of a proton and a neutron is 1.673*10^-27 kg, the velocity is 2.75*10^5 m/s, and Planck's constant is 6.626*10^-34 J.s. Plug in to De Broglie's equation: (6.626*10^-34 J.s) / ((1.673*10^-27 kg)(2.75*10^5 m/s)) = 1.44*10^-12 m The wavelength of the proton and the neutron are the same because...
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:57 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Post Module #35
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Post Module #35

The velocity has to be in m/s instead of km/hr.

(125 km/hr)(1000 m/1 km)(1 hr/3600 s) = 34.72 m/s

(6.626*10^-34)/(275*34.72) = 6.94*10^-38 m
by Amanda Lin 2I
Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:39 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Rydberg constant
Replies: 7
Views: 58

Re: Rydberg constant

Isabella Dal Porto 1I wrote:Why is the Rydberg equation only applicable towards hydrogen atoms?

The Rydberg equation only works for atoms with one electron. If there is more than one electron, the formula will produce incorrect results.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:16 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Homework Question F.9
Replies: 6
Views: 59

Re: Homework Question F.9

Yes, you would use a 100 g sample, so there would be 63.15 g C, 5.30 g H, and 31.55 g O. You would then convert these to moles.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:09 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: When to round for sig figs?
Replies: 12
Views: 88

Re: When to round for sig figs?

Rounding for sig figs is usually done at the end. If you round during the calculations, it could affect your final answer.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:58 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant problems
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Limiting Reactant problems

For problems asking to calculate the percent yield, the actual yield is usually provided in the prompt.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Writing out equations
Replies: 9
Views: 112

Re: Writing out equations

There is an order to the elements in chemical formulas due to the Hill System. Carbon comes first, next is hydrogen, and then it is the rest of the elements alphabetized. There are also exceptions to this rule.
by Amanda Lin 2I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:04 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Practical Application of Sig Figs?
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Practical Application of Sig Figs?

Sig figs are used so that measurements do not appear more precise than possible with the given information. It helps show uncertainty.

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