Search found 64 matches

by Aarja Pavade 1H
Fri Jan 24, 2020 10:02 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: O2 Delta Hf
Replies: 2
Views: 7

Re: O2 Delta Hf

By definition, the standard enthalpy of formation of an element in its most stable form is zero. Thus, this does not just apply to diatomic molecules, but to all elements in their most stable forms.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:55 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Steam v. liquid
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: Steam v. liquid

Yes, since the enthalpy of vaporization (steam) is very large for water, the enthalpy of condensation is very large and exothermic, releasing more energy and causing more severe burns.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Fri Jan 24, 2020 9:48 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Endothermic values
Replies: 5
Views: 13

Re: Endothermic values

The plus sign reinforces the fact the delta H is positive and that heat is needed ("added") for the reaction. It would not necessarily be wrong if you left it out, however, since the value would still be positive.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:25 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Ideal Gas meaning
Replies: 7
Views: 34

Re: Ideal Gas meaning

At low temperatures, most gases are going to act ideally. In this course, we'll probably only deal with ideal gases because this allows for us to apply PV=nRT and infer molecular kinetic energy based on temperature. How do we know when to apply the ideal gas equation in a problem? The ideal gas equ...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:12 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure
Replies: 6
Views: 17

Re: Le Chatliers Principle In relation to pressure

More molecules would essentially mean less volume. The more particles you add into an empty flask, the less empty space there is. Since there is less volume, the pressure in the flask will increase. This is demonstrated through the inverse relationship between pressure and volume and the equation P=...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:09 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Questions and Sig Figs
Replies: 6
Views: 39

Re: Equilibrium Questions and Sig Figs

I agree with the last user's post in that it is best to round to the number of given sig figs at the very end. When dealing with pH however, the sig figs are typically calculated differently (calculated in the way of a logarithm) which I believe is 3 sig figs usually. For pH, the sig figs in the gi...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 5:58 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K and Kc
Replies: 3
Views: 18

Re: K and Kc

Since we have not done examples/homework problems relating to converting K to Kc as in example 5H.1, I do not believe we are expected to know this for Test 1. However, you should know how to convert from concentration to pressure in situations where you are given bars and are expected to calculate K...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:48 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5J.1 a)
Replies: 5
Views: 22

Re: 5J.1 a)

Both H2 and CO2 will need to react together in order to make more reactants (the reverse reaction). Thus, the partial pressure of H2 will also have to decrease.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:36 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Temperature and K
Replies: 6
Views: 34

Re: Temperature and K

If the reaction is endothermic (requires heat) while forming product, heating will favor product formation, increasing K. If the reaction is exothermic (gives off heat) while forming product, then heating it will favor reactant formation, lowering K.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:32 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: appliction of principle
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: appliction of principle

LeChatlier's principle applies to changing concentration and physical parameters such as pressure and temperature. However, only a change in temperature will change the K value. Changing the concentration or pressure will not change K.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Jan 12, 2020 1:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Factors Affecting K
Replies: 5
Views: 29

Re: Factors Affecting K

Furthermore, the change in concentration does not change K as the chemical reaction at equilibrium represents a fixed product to reactant ratio. The chemical reactions adjust so as to minimize the effect of changes. This is LeChatlier's Principle. K, however, is dependent on the temperature which is...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 11, 2020 5:19 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Alternative Forms [ENDORSED]
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: Alternative Forms [ENDORSED]

It also depends on the states of the molecules. For instance, if given gases and their partial pressure, Kp will be used. For aqueous substances and concentration, Kc will be used. However, you can convert between partial pressure and concentration for a gas by using the ideal gas law and deriving t...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Jan 11, 2020 5:13 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Adding inert gas [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 41

Re: Adding inert gas [ENDORSED]

According to the book, the inert gas increases the total pressure within a reaction vessel. The reacting gases, however, will still occupy the same volume, meaning their concentrations and partial pressures remain the same despite the inert gas. Thus, the introduction of the inert gas has no effect ...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:12 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Acid/base reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Acid/base reactions

If you consider H+ as a proton, it should not make sense that Lewis acids will accept H+, as they are electron pair acceptors. If you think about the conjugate base of an acid, it will have a more negative charge than the acid since it has lost a proton/gained an electron pair. Hopefully this helps.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:08 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: strength of bases
Replies: 1
Views: 23

Re: strength of bases

Strong bases include Group 1 and 2 metal oxides and hydroxides. The oxide ion in metal oxide would react with water to form hydroxide ions, making it a strong base. Thus, Li2O is not an exception, but is in fact is strong base.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:41 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Knowing strong acids and bases
Replies: 6
Views: 71

Re: Knowing strong acids and bases

Also, memorizing the strong acids and bases will help you recognize which acids and bases will be weak and not completely disassociate, as they will just be any acid/base that is not strong.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:35 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand Charges
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Ligand Charges

To calculate the charge of the ligand, you would "give back" the lone pair that it donated to the cation and look at the ligand individually (not bonded to the cation).
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:31 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Charge of Iron in Hemoglobin
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: Charge of Iron in Hemoglobin

To figure out the ligand's charge, give back the lone pair that it donated to the cation. This would mean that two of the nitrogens have a formal charge of 0 (1 lone pair, 1 double bond, and 1 single bond) while the other two nitrogens will have a formal charge of -1 (2 lone pairs and 2 single bonds...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:09 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Arrhenius
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: Arrhenius

Just for your reference, Arrhenius acids disassociate into water to form H+ while Arrhenius bases disassociate in water to form OH-.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:02 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Oxoacids
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: Oxoacids

Going off the previous post, oxoacids more readily lose H+ if the resulting anion is stabilized by the electron withdrawing atom which delocalize and stabilize the negative charge.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:58 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Relative acidity
Replies: 4
Views: 19

Re: Relative acidity

Strong acids produce more protons than a weak acid. Strong acids are completely ionized in solution while weak acids are incompletely ionized.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong versus weak
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: Strong versus weak

Strong acids produce more protons in solution than a weak acid, i.e they are completely disassociated. Weak acids are incompletely ionized in solution.Strong bases are completely ionized in water while weak bases are not completely ionized in water.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:49 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: amphoteric oxides
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: amphoteric oxides

Yes, and between the metal oxides (bases) and nonmetal oxides (acids) there is a diagonal band of amphoteric oxides closely matching the diagonal band of metalloids.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 3:34 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: 9C. 9
Replies: 1
Views: 14

Re: 9C. 9

The ethylenediamine molecule, NH2CH2CH2NH2, is a polydentate ligand and in formulas is abbreviated to en. EDTA refers to ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetate.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 3:27 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Heme complex
Replies: 8
Views: 48

Re: Heme complex

How would something like this appear on a test? would we define it or say why it's needed or what? I believe that it could have to do with identifying that the Fe bound to the porphyrin ligand is the heme complex or that a heme complex and protein form myoglobin. Knowing the definition would help w...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 3:20 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: chelating complexes
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: chelating complexes

Going off of the previous post, a chelate is a complex that contains a ligand that forms a ring of atoms that includes the central metal atom. The example given to us in class was ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetate.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 3:12 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Tetrahedral and Square Planar
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Tetrahedral and Square Planar

In lecture, we were given the example of a porphyrin ligand which was stated to be tetradentate square planar.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:53 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Biological Examples
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: Biological Examples

Additionally, I think it is good to review hemoglobin in addition to myoglobin. For instance, know that myoglobin relates to the transport of oxygen in muscle cells while hemoglobin relates to the transport of oxygen in the blood and has 4 myoglobin-like molecules.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 24, 2019 12:47 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Polydentate Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: Polydentate Ligands

Polydentate essentially means "many-toothed". These ligands can occupy more than one binding site simultaneously. You would use the prefixes bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, pentakis- for polydentate ligands.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:31 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pairs
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: Lone Pairs

The shapes with lone pairs are bent, trigonal pyramidal, seesaw, T-shape, linear, square pyramid, and square planar. Some of these names overlap for the basic geometry shapes (ex: both trigonal planar and tetrahedral have bent shapes, but for trigonal planar 1 lone pair creates a bent shape vc tetra...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:22 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Repulsion
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: Repulsion

Repulsion influences the molecular shape as it can force bonding electrons closer together, reducing their bond angle. For instance, a molecule with a tetrahedral shape has bond angles of 109.5 but once lone pairs are introduced, there is greater repulsion and the bond angles decrease to <109.5 with...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 11:54 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR notation
Replies: 8
Views: 59

Re: VSEPR notation

Single, double, and triple bonds are considered single regions of electron density in the VSEPR model, so even though there is a double bond between N and O, the VSEPR notation would still be AX3.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:45 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Lone pairs
Replies: 7
Views: 68

Re: Lone pairs

The lone pairs can either be axial or equatorial. The axial lone pairs lie on the axis of the molecule and the equatorial lone pairs lie on the equator of the molecule, the plane perpendicular to the axis.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 9:40 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole Moment
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: Dipole Moment

Furthermore, the dipole moments help us figure out if a molecule is polar or non polar. This classification will allow us to figure out what type of bonds/intermolecular forces are present within a molecule. For example, if the dipole moments do not cancel, the molecule is polar. A non polar molecul...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:30 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Ionization Energy

I believe you're asking why nitrogen has a higher ionization energy than oxygen. This is because nitrogen is more stable. Looking at its electron configuration, nitrogen has 3 electrons in is p-orbital meaning that each orbital contains one electron. Oxygen, on the other hand has 4 electrons its p-o...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:18 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Instantaneous dipoles
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Instantaneous dipoles

According to the book, an instantaneous dipole moment is a momentary dipolar separation of charge. In an instant, a region of a molecule can have a partial negative charge while the other has a partial positive charge.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:07 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Positive Dissociation Energy & Negative Interaction Potential Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: Positive Dissociation Energy & Negative Interaction Potential Energy

In class, it was explained that since disassociation energy is the energy required to break a bond, it is always positive. The interaction potential energy is negative, however, because it is always an attractive force(the charges have opposite signs).
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:02 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dissociation Energy
Replies: 5
Views: 28

Re: Dissociation Energy

Furthermore, since the disassociation energy is the energy required to break a bond, it measures the strength of the bond and is also always positive.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:52 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarisability Trend
Replies: 3
Views: 12

Re: Polarisability Trend

Furthermore, small, highly charged cations such as Al3+ also have high polarizing power.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:51 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Definition
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: Definition

While the above definition is correct, electronegativity has the same trend as ionization energy, not atomic radius. It increases across a period and decreases down a group.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:47 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Minimize formal charge of whole molecule?
Replies: 7
Views: 35

Re: Minimize formal charge of whole molecule?

Keep in mind that if the molecule has a specific charge you would want to keep that charge, not make it 0. For instance, in the sulfate ion (SO4 2-), two oxygens will have to have a -1 charge so that the total charge remains -2. We assign the negative charge to oxygen instead of sulfur, though, beca...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:40 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: which bond
Replies: 4
Views: 36

Re: which bond

If the electronegativity difference is greater than 2, it is an ionic bond. If it is less than 1.5 it is a covalent bond.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Expanded Valence Shells
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: Expanded Valence Shells

The octet guideline refers to 8 electrons. This gives us the configuration of s2p6. For atoms in Period 3 or higher, their n (principal quantum number) is 3. This gives us an l of 0,1,2, meaning that they have an s,p,and d orbital. The d-orbitals allow Period 3 and higher elements to accommodate the...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 6:31 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Double bond
Replies: 15
Views: 107

Re: Double bond

Two things to pay attention to are formal charge and octets. Most elements want to have a full shell of valence electrons, so try to make sure that they all have 8 electrons around them. Next is to pay attention to the formal charge. If by forming a double bond, the formal charge is closer to 0, th...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:48 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Formal Charge
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Formal Charge

Furthermore, keep in mind that the total charge still has to remain the same. For instance, in class we looked at the example of the sulfate ion (SO4^2-). Here, only two of the oxygen atoms had a formal charge of 0 while the other two each had a charge of -1. This is to ensure that the 2- charge of ...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:39 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Exceptions to Octet Rule
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: Exceptions to Octet Rule

Atoms in period 3 or higher (such as P,S and Cl) have d-orbitals in valence shells that can accommodate additional electrons. The octet rule goes up to the p-orbital as 8 valence electrons means an electron configuration of s^2p^6. Thus, atoms with d- or even f-orbitals can accommodate more than 8 v...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:33 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: ionic radius
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: ionic radius

An ionic radius is simply half the distance between the centers of two ions that are joined by an ionic bond. I think that the value is usually given to us, but we might have to do calculations converting it from pm (what it is measured in) to meters or Angstroms. To do this you would just need to k...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:23 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: ionization energy and electron affinty
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: ionization energy and electron affinty

Electron affinity is the energy released when electrons are added to a gas-phase atom while ionization energy is the energy ended to remove electrons from an atom (gas-phase). There is generally a high electron affinity for Group 17 atoms.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 26, 2019 11:20 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Drawing Lewis Structures
Replies: 5
Views: 55

Re: Drawing Lewis Structures

Going off of the previous comment, atoms in period 3 or higher (such as P,S, and Cl) have d-orbitals in valence shells that accommodate more than 8 valence electrons, deviating from the octet guideline.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 8:07 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron configuration for Ag
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Electron configuration for Ag

When we looked at the Scandium example, we saw that the right way to write the electron configuration was [Ar]3d14s2 because for multi-electron atoms after atomic number 20 the 4s state is higher in energy than 3d. Period 5 shows this same trend where after 2 electrons have occupied the 5s state the...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 5:56 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 3d and 4s
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Re: 3d and 4s

After the 4s state/orbital is occupied and electrons enter the 3d state, the 3d state would be lower in energy than the 4s state. This occurs for multi electron atoms after the atomic number 20 (Calcium). For Scandium (z=21), you would put 3d1 before 4s2 because the 4s state is higher in energy than...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:45 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: electrostatic (coulomb) potential energy [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Re: electrostatic (coulomb) potential energy [ENDORSED]

Furthermore, he wanted us to understand the relationship between the charges and the electrostatic potential energy as well as the relationship between the distance of the charges and the electrostatic potential energy. From the equation E=(q1)(q2)/r, we see that the energy is directly proportional ...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:34 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Hund's rule and Pauli Exclusion Principle
Replies: 14
Views: 91

Re: Hund's rule and Pauli Exclusion Principle

We apply both Pauli Exclusion Principle and Hund's Rule to obtain the ground state electron configuration.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:23 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Lobes
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: Lobes

Lobes also refer to areas of electron density located in xy-yz-zx planes.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 13, 2019 4:10 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: atomic spectra
Replies: 5
Views: 57

Re: atomic spectra

In transitions of electrons between energy levels in an atom, as a high energy electron drops to a lower energy level, the difference in energy is given off as a photon. The atomic spectra refers to this spectrum of light emitted and shows the different groups of spectral lines. It is also unique fo...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:56 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: ejecting electons
Replies: 6
Views: 54

Re: ejecting electons

Only one photon interacts with one electron and each photon must have enough energy to eject one electron. If the energy per photon is greater than or equal to the energy needed to remove an electron, then increasing the light intensity (increasing the number of photons) would result in more ejected...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 13, 2019 2:48 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: black body radiation
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: black body radiation

Electrons in atoms and molecules absorb or emit quanta of energy, which gives atom (and molecular) spectra. Atoms and molecules only absorb or emit unique frequencies that are allowed by their unique electronic structure. This is unlike "black bodies" that absorb or emit a broad range of w...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:51 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Classic Wave in Photoelectric effect
Replies: 5
Views: 44

Re: Classic Wave in Photoelectric effect

Increasing the light intensity only increases the number of photons. To remove electrons, we need the energy of the photon to be greater than or equal to the energy needed to remove an electron. If you have this energy, then increasing the light intensity results in more ejected electrons. Light doe...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:37 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photoelectric Effect
Replies: 3
Views: 57

Re: Photoelectric Effect

Furthermore, the photoelectric experiment that light sources with long wavelengths (low frequency) cannot eject electrons. This is because energy is inversely proportional to wavelength. However, light sources with short wavelengths (high frequency) will have higher energy so they will be able to ej...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 06, 2019 2:08 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Mole help [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 94

Re: Mole help [ENDORSED]

Also, keep in mind that in chemistry, atoms are not created or destroyed. As mentioned before, since moles refer to the number of atoms, moles of solute will always remain the somewhen diluting a solution.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 06, 2019 1:57 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Differentiating between elements are molecules or single
Replies: 4
Views: 63

Re: Differentiating between elements are molecules or single

Also, since oxygen gas does occur as a diatomic molecule, make sure that when you balance equations you take into account that it is double. For instant you might have O2 on on side of the equation and O on the other. If you have 4O2, the O must be doubled (8O) since it is a monatomic molecule.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 06, 2019 1:50 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Confusion with the formula M1V1=M2V2
Replies: 4
Views: 34

Re: Confusion with the formula M1V1=M2V2

The final volume (V2) would be the sum of the initial volume (10 mL) and what was added to the solution (20 mL). Thus, the final volume would be 30 mL.
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Sun Oct 06, 2019 1:43 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Wrong Textbook
Replies: 12
Views: 167

Re: Wrong Textbook

I also had gotten the 6th edition of the textbook and was worried about whether there would be a major difference between the 6th edition and 7th edition. I asked both an UA and Dr. Lavelle and the consensus was that the issue would be discrepancies between the numbering of problems. I ended up gett...
by Aarja Pavade 1H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:02 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Lab experiments- accuracy vs precision
Replies: 7
Views: 87

Re: Lab experiments- accuracy vs precision

To further understand the difference between accuracy and precision, you can refer to the example of the dartboard that Dr. Lavelle presented in class. The dartboard that showcased precision had all of the darts clustered around one area of the board, not necessarily on the bull's-eye. However, the ...

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