Search found 50 matches

by WUng_1D
Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:56 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: 6C.21
Replies: 1
Views: 79

Re: 6C.21

I doubt we need to know the formula for formic acid, Lavelle will most likely give us the formula for it
by WUng_1D
Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:54 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Marshmallow Hybridization Problem
Replies: 3
Views: 129

Marshmallow Hybridization Problem

Can someone explain how to the part where it has us identify the composition of each bond. In the image I don't understand why one oxygen's hybridization is 2sp2 while another is just sp3. Why does the 2 disappear? https://imgur.com/a/eqjr8LV Edit: Not sure how to upload pictures so here is the link...
by WUng_1D
Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:49 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: IUPAC Name Convention
Replies: 1
Views: 31

IUPAC Name Convention

When doing the marshmallow problems it asked us to name a compound with cyanide in it. They used cyano though instead of cyanido, which method is the correct way to name it on the test.
by WUng_1D
Sat Dec 07, 2019 11:48 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Nitrito vs nitro
Replies: 1
Views: 40

Nitrito vs nitro

What is the difference between nitrito and nitro? Looking at Lavelle's ligand names sheet both of them are called nitrito using the new IUPAC name convention. Except one has a -kN suffix and the other has a -kO suffix. Overall how do I recognize the difference between the two even though they are th...
by WUng_1D
Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:03 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Stronger acid
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Stronger acid

For question 6C.19 it asks between HF or HCl, which is the stronger acid. I've already checked the answer and see that HCl is the stronger acid, but conceptually I do not understand why. Their explanation is that due to HCl having a weaker bond strength than HF, it is the stronger acid. Can someone ...
by WUng_1D
Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:20 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: hybridizing coordination compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: hybridizing coordination compounds

Hybridization state of coordination compounds is based on the coordination number. Coordination numbers are number of atoms, ions, or molecules that a central atom or ion holds as its nearest neighbors in a complex or coordination compound. For example, if the coordination number is 4 then your hybr...
by WUng_1D
Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:13 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Neutralizations
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Re: Neutralizations

Wendy Perez 3A wrote:In a neutralization reaction, acids and bases always produce salt and water.


Where does the water come from in the reaction between ammonia and phosphoric acid then?
by WUng_1D
Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:07 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: 6A17 - SO3 and As2O3
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Re: 6A17 - SO3 and As2O3

I went about this question mainly looking at the periodic table. You just need to recognize that metals generally form basic oxides, nonmetals form acidic oxides, and metalloids form amphoteric oxides. So in this problem sulfur is a nonmetal and therefore would form an acidic oxide. As for arsenic, ...
by WUng_1D
Wed Dec 04, 2019 9:01 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Neutralization Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: Neutralization Reactions

Yes, zinc would be the conjugate base. Although we are not familiar with the compound, I think Lavelle just wants us to understand the formation of salts. We don't need to memorize all of the bases and acids because that would be absurd. Just recognize which would be the conjugate acid or base and a...
by WUng_1D
Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Neutralizations
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Neutralizations

Do acid and base reactions, a neutralization reaction, always produce water?

I am looking at the reaction between ammonia and phosphoric acid and I am not sure where the water would come from (Question J.9 part B)
by WUng_1D
Sun Dec 01, 2019 10:29 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Acid/Base strength
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: Acid/Base strength

You can compare the strengths of acids and bases by how much a molecule is protonated or deprotanated.
by WUng_1D
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:15 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Classifying Salts
Replies: 5
Views: 56

Re: Classifying Salts

I think it depends on the reaction because we can tell something is an acid if they are a proton donor while a base is a proton acceptor. Knowing this you would have to see whether the salt is giving away its proton or accepting it.
by WUng_1D
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:13 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong/Weak Acids and Bases
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Strong/Weak Acids and Bases

Weak acids and weak bases only ionize partially. Therefore, when they are mixed, it generally results in a reversible reaction with the formation of a conjugate acid and a conjugate base as products.
by WUng_1D
Sun Dec 01, 2019 9:08 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: When to change to -ate?
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: When to change to -ate?

If the complex has an overall negative charge, an anionic complex, the suffix -ate is added to the stem of the metal's name. Additionally, if the symbol of the metal originates from a Latin name,then the Latin stem is used.
by WUng_1D
Fri Nov 29, 2019 11:01 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C.1
Replies: 6
Views: 115

Re: 9C.1

Why does cyanide turn into cyano instead of cyanido?
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:24 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2.61 Radicals
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: 2.61 Radicals

It goes to the oxygen because it is more electronegative, the radical thus ends up on the carbon which has a formal charge of 0 with a single lone electron.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:20 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: How to calculate pH and pOH
Replies: 2
Views: 55

How to calculate pH and pOH

For question 6B.5 it states... Calculate the pH and pOH of each of the following aqueous solutions of a strong acid or base: (a) 0.0146 m HNO3(aq); (b) 0.11 mHCl(aq); (c) 0.0092 m Ba(OH)2(aq); (d) 2.00 mL of 0.175 m KOH(aq) after dilution to 0.500 L; (e) 13.6 mg of NaOH dissolved in 0.350 L of solut...
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:15 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Indicators of oxides
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Indicators of oxides

How can you tell if an oxide is basic, acidic, or amphoteric

The problem i'm working on is 6A.17
State whether the following oxides are acidic, basic, or amphoteric: (a) BaO; (b) SO3; (c) As2O3; (d) Bi2O3-.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:09 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: H
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: H

Hybridization is the idea that atomic orbitals fuse to form newly hybridized orbitals, which in turn, influences molecular geometry and bonding properties. Hybridization is also an expansion of the valence bond theory.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:06 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: d orbital
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: d orbital

I would think it is because Aufbau principle applies still where electrons fill atomic orbitals of the lowest available energy levels before occupying higher levels.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:25 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: 2E. 27
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: 2E. 27

A polar molecule is a molecule with a nonzero dipole moment while a nonpolar molecule is a molecule that has no electric dipole moment.

Simply look for dipole moments and see which way they go, depending on the molecule they will either cancel each other out or won't.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:45 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Drawing the Lewis Structure of N20 (2E.13d)
Replies: 5
Views: 55

Re: Drawing the Lewis Structure of N20 (2E.13d)

There are two lewis structures for N2O, the first one has N as the central atom and a triple bond connecting it to the other N molecule and a single bond connecting the oxygen molecule. As for the second lewis structure, N is the central atom again but there are double bonds connecting both the seco...
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:05 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 5
Views: 63

Radicals

How do radicals affect bond shapes, is it considered another region of electron density?
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 17, 2019 7:30 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Linear molecule with lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 40

Linear molecule with lone pairs

For questions 2E.1 part b it asks...
Below are ball-and-stick models of two molecules. In each case, indicate whether there must be, may be, or cannot be one or more lone pairs of electrons on the central atom.

How is it possible for a linear molecule to have lone pairs?
by WUng_1D
Sat Nov 16, 2019 12:12 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 6
Views: 83

Re: Polarity

If the difference in electronegativity for the atoms in a bond is greater than 0.4, we consider the bond polar. If the difference in electronegativity is less than 0.4, the bond is essentially nonpolar. If there are no polar bonds, the molecule is nonpolar. When drawing just look for the dipoles and...
by WUng_1D
Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:58 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F.19
Replies: 1
Views: 48

3F.19

Account for the following observations in terms of the type and strength of intermolecular forces. (a) The melting point of solid xenon is -112 C and that of solid argon is 2189 C. (b) The vapor pressure of diethyl ether (C2H5OC2H5) is greater than that of water. (c) The boiling point of pentane, CH...
by WUng_1D
Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:55 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Help of 3F.11
Replies: 5
Views: 56

Help of 3F.11

Which of the following molecules are likely to form hydrogen bonds: (a) PH3; (b) HBr; (c) C2H4; (d) HNO2?

How can I tell which molecules are more likely to form hydrogen bonds.
by WUng_1D
Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:48 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization energy
Replies: 6
Views: 180

Re: Ionization energy

I like to think of it as oxygen is more willing to give up its electrons in order to attain a half full shell of electrons which is why it will require less energy to remove the electron.
by WUng_1D
Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:46 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole moments
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Dipole moments

If a molecule is completely symmetric, then the dipole moment vectors on each molecule will cancel each other out, making the molecule nonpolar
by WUng_1D
Mon Nov 04, 2019 11:42 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizing Power Periodic Trend
Replies: 4
Views: 55

Re: Polarizing Power Periodic Trend

Generally atoms with polarizing power are the ones that cause large distortions in highly polarizable atoms ions. Atoms/ions that are able to do this are small cations since they want electrons and additionally due to their small size are able to hold on to their electrons more strongly. So when loo...
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 03, 2019 6:02 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Characteristics of Metallic and Nonmetallic Elements
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: Characteristics of Metallic and Nonmetallic Elements

Metallic elements generally have properties intermediate between those of metals and nonmetals such as silicon and boron. Nonmetals on the other hand do not exhibit metallic properties. They are gases located generally in the upper right hand corner of the periodic table.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:59 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Energy of electron
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: Energy of electron

Yes you should use the energy of photon formula, so for part A you would convert the given wavelength to meters in order to plug it into the equation E=hc/lambda. Then for part B you convert the mass of the sodium atoms into atoms of sodium through dimensional analysis. You would turn the mg to gram...
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 03, 2019 4:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: More stable structures
Replies: 2
Views: 40

More stable structures

I know that the most ideal structures are the ones with minimal formal charges. How do I recognize if there is a more stable structure while drawing the lewis structures. Additionally if asked to draw a lewis structure, would I get points marked off if I don't draw the most stable one.
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:52 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Understanding Lyman and Balmer series
Replies: 3
Views: 63

Understanding Lyman and Balmer series

I understand that when a transition is in the Lyman series or Balmer series, n will equal either 1 or 2. In the problem I was working on (1A.15) we know it is the Lyman series so n should equal 1. How do I know whether this n is the inital or final energy level though? I'm not sure if I solved it ri...
by WUng_1D
Sun Nov 03, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Amount of electrons in each shell
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Amount of electrons in each shell

I was doing a problem where it asked for the amount of valence electrons in each ion, in this case the ion was Co^3+. I originally was taught the first shell can have 2 electrons, the second shell can have 8 electrons, then the third shell can have 8 electrons. When I looked up the amount of valence...
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:28 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Spin
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Electron Spin

When drawing the arrows for the orbitals, why do we have the draw the arrows going up first and then the arrows going down after
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:15 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 2
Views: 40

Re: Electron Configurations

In terms of e- config, it does not change. Atoms bond to try to achieve full octets (full orbital shells). When atoms bond they instead reconfigure their orbital shells into hybrid orbitals sp3 sp2 sp to create bonds.
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:57 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Help on 1F.3
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Help on 1F.3

For this question I was wondering how the charges on the elements of this question affect ionic radium. Will the extra electrons influence the radium at all?

Place the following ions in order of increasing ionic radius: S^2-, Cl^-, P^3-
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:54 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Question 1E.17
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Question 1E.17

Hi can someone explain to me how to start, thank you! (part d is omitted)

For each of the following ground-state atoms, predict the type of orbital (1s, 2p, 3d, 4f, etc.) from which an electron will be removed to form the 1 1 ion: (a) Zn; (b) Cl; (c) Al; (d) Cu.
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 9:32 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 4
Views: 82

Electron Configuration

Can someone explain to me why an element such as Scandium ([Ar]3d14s2) has the 3d orbital come before the 4s orbital?
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:57 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1B.25
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: 1B.25

You would first have to use Heisenberg's Indeterminacy Equation which is... Delta p * Delta > or = to h/(4pi) We can plug in 350 pm as our delta X, uncertainty in position, since it is given to us, we would first change it to 3.50 x 10^-10 m in order to get the proper units. Now we solve for delta p...
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:46 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Week 3 Homework Topics
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: Week 3 Homework Topics

I believe as long as you work on any questions from the Quantum World unit, it won't matter which questions you do. You just can't work on previous units despite having an earlier discussion.
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:44 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Diffraction Patterns
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Diffraction Patterns

From my understanding constructive interference is when two waves of the same wave length interact to create a bigger wave than the original. While destructive interference is when waves are not perfectly aligned, the resulting combined wave will have crests shorter than the original wave. In regard...
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:17 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: How to start on 1B.9
Replies: 1
Views: 38

How to start on 1B.9

A lamp rated at 32 W (1 W = 1 J*s^-1) emits violet light of wavelength 420 nm. How many photons of violet light can the lamp generate in 2.0 s? How many moles of photons are emitted in that time interval?

I'm having difficulty starting this problem, I'm not sure which formula I should use.
by WUng_1D
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Help on 1E.17
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Help on 1E.17

For each of the following ground-state atoms, predict the type of orbital (1s, 2p, 3d, 4f, etc.) from which an electron will be removed to form the 1+ ion: (a) Ge; (b) Mn; (c) Ba; (d) Au. Does removing an electron from the element bring the element down an entire unit, or can it stay in the same orb...
by WUng_1D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:17 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Diatomic elements?
Replies: 8
Views: 125

Re: Diatomic elements?

They are diatomic because they always exist in this form in real life, you will never find oxygen or any of the other diatomic elements.
by WUng_1D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:16 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: No numbers in problem?
Replies: 3
Views: 98

Re: No numbers in problem?

I doubt there would be a situation where there is no given number making it impossible to calculate the amount of sig figs, however you can use real life logic to figure out the amount of sig figs. For example if we were dealing with people then you would not be using any decimals.
by WUng_1D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:13 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: How do you find the percentage yield for M.3 on page F104?
Replies: 3
Views: 67

Re: How do you find the percentage yield for M.3 on page F104?

Percent yield is actual yield/theoretical yield, actual yield will always be given because it the real life results of an experiment while theoretical yield is what we find using stoichiometry.
by WUng_1D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:10 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Question on H15
Replies: 3
Views: 84

Re: Question on H15

Most times the states of matter will just be given to you however, certain factors can indicate the state such as the type of reaction (combustion reaction) would need oxygen which is always a gas.
by WUng_1D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: States of matter
Replies: 2
Views: 59

States of matter

When balancing an equation do the states of matter affect how balancing equations occur? For example in a combustion reaction there are ashes or smoke that is released so, are those taken into account when writing out equations?

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