Search found 50 matches

by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:45 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Shape
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Shape

To find the shape of a coordination compound, count the number of ligands attached to the central atom. This is called the coordination number. If there are 6, the shape is octahedral. If there are 4, it is tetrahedral or square planar, depending on the arrangement of the ligands.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:40 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: J.9
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Re: J.9

First, put the acid and bases given on the reactants side. Then, on the products side, put water and combine the elements on the reactants side that are NOT hydrogen or oxygen into one molecule. This is the salt that is formed. Then, balance the two sides of the equation.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:36 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: amphoteric
Replies: 5
Views: 79

Re: amphoteric

To put it simply, all amphiprotic substances are amphoteric, but not all amphoteric substances are amphiprotic. All amphiprotic substances must be able to donate and accept a hydrogen atom.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:28 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong acids and bases
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Strong acids and bases

As well as memorizing the list of strong bases, it's helpful to know that the hydroxides of group 1 and 2 metals are usually considered to be strong bases.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 5:20 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Net Ionic Equation Explanation from Textbook
Replies: 1
Views: 32

Re: Net Ionic Equation Explanation from Textbook

I think it's saying that instead of splitting the weak acid/base into its individual elements like usually done in a net ionic equation, they are kept as whole molecules.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Dec 02, 2019 12:34 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Water as a acid or base
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: Water as a acid or base

The classification of water depends on the compound it is reacting with. Since it is amphoteric, if it reacts with an acid it will act as a weak base, and if it acts with a base it will act as a weak acid.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Dec 02, 2019 12:32 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Final Study Methods
Replies: 11
Views: 99

Re: Final Study Methods

What helped me a lot was attending the large midterm review session and going over the worksheet given many times in order to catch any mistakes I could potentially make on the test. For the final, I suggest going over missed problems from the midterm and going to future review sessions.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Dec 02, 2019 12:25 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Difference
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: Difference

I would study the methods to determine the strength of different acids and how to order them by strength given a list of acids.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Dec 02, 2019 12:21 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: Chelates Visual
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Chelates Visual

I watched this video and it really helped me understand the concept of chelates: youtube.com/watch?v=RM6l2JfHxg8
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Dec 02, 2019 12:19 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Textbook Focus
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Re: Textbook Focus

The sp3 orbital seems to be the most common, with examples such as ch4 or anything with 4 atoms bonded to it.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:26 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridizing oxygen
Replies: 5
Views: 62

Re: hybridizing oxygen

To find the hybridization of an atom, you need to find its steric number. The steric number is calculated by adding the number of atoms bonded to the central atom plus the number of lone pairs on the central atom. In this case, because oxygen has 1 carbon bonded to it + 2 lone pairs, its steric numb...
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:20 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: unhybridized p-orbitals
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: unhybridized p-orbitals

P-orbitals actually are hybridized. They combine with s and orbitals to form sp or spd hybridized orbitals.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:16 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: lone pairs in hybridization
Replies: 8
Views: 57

Re: lone pairs in hybridization

Lone pairs on the central atom occupy their own separate hybrid orbital, so they count towards the total hybridization of the atom.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:13 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Ion-dipole vs Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Re: Ion-dipole vs Hydrogen Bonding

No, because ions have far greater charges than those of dipole moments, it will have a stronger attraction and therefore result in a stronger interaction.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:07 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2F:7.d
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: 2F:7.d

SeF3+ has 4 regions of electron density because of its lone pair and 3 bonded atoms, so its steric number is 4, giving it a hybridization of sp3.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:39 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Hybridization
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Hybridization

When two atoms use both s and p orbitals to bond, the energy levels of the electrons become unevenly distributed. To equalize this, s and p orbitals hybridize to form a single hybrid orbital. This imbalance does not occur in every molecule, so not all molecules are hybridized.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:26 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 6
Views: 57

Re: Polarity

To determine polarity, measure the electronegativity of all the atoms in the molecule. If there is an uneven distribution of electronegativity (more electronegativity to one side of the atom), there will be a dipole moment, causing the molecule to be polar.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:22 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Shape of Molecules affect boiling point?
Replies: 7
Views: 98

Re: Shape of Molecules affect boiling point?

When two rod-shaped molecules come close together, there are more spots to experience London dispersion forces, so they will be more tightly attracted to each other, thus raising the boiling point.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:19 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Interaction Potential Energy Equation?
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: Interaction Potential Energy Equation?

The interaction potential energy is the measurement of the energy that is released when two atoms/molecules interact.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:13 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lone Pair Repulsion?
Replies: 5
Views: 42

Re: Lone Pair Repulsion?

Lone pairs are further from the central atom because they aren't being pulled towards another atom, so they will repel more.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:27 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Interaction energy
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: Interaction energy

Interaction potential energy measures the strength of the attraction between atoms or molecules. It is affected by factors such as polarizability, size, and shape.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:23 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Exceptions to Octet Rule
Replies: 7
Views: 70

Re: Exceptions to Octet Rule

Yes, these elements can exceed the octet rule because their empty d-subshell can take on electrons if needed, thus letting the atom hold more than 8 valence electrons.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:14 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Interaction potential energy
Replies: 7
Views: 58

Re: Interaction potential energy

Because the valence electrons on larger atoms are less tightly held, there is a higher chance for them to form temporary dipoles and exhibit intermolecular forces.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:10 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Strength of ionic and covalent bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 53

Re: Strength of ionic and covalent bonds

Ionic bonds are generally stronger than covalent bonds because of the strong attraction between oppositely charged ions.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Nov 08, 2019 12:08 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: frequency and ejection of electrons
Replies: 7
Views: 195

Re: frequency and ejection of electrons

Frequency is directly proportional to the energy of the incoming light. If this energy exceeds the threshold energy for the surface, it will eject electrons.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 28, 2019 5:51 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron configuration exceptions
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Electron configuration exceptions

If the elements Cr and Cu have different electron configurations than expected because of half-filled and fully filled d subshells, does this also apply to the elements directly under them, like Mo, Ag, etc?
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 28, 2019 5:47 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 2A.5
Replies: 4
Views: 62

Re: 2A.5

In the case of copper, a full d subshell is more stable than only being partially filled. This means that the electron configuration of Cu is [Ar] 3d10 4s1. Since this question asks about Cu+, there is one less electron, so it is taken out from the s subshell to maintain the full d subshell.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 28, 2019 5:44 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 2A.13
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: 2A.13

Cl will only become negatively charged if an electron is added, not taken away. This question asks about removing electrons, and Cl would become positively charged if an electron is removed.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 28, 2019 5:40 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: valence electrons
Replies: 6
Views: 50

Re: valence electrons

Since Manganese is a transition metal with an incomplete d-block, it can use the 5 d-block electrons for bonding, as well as the 2 in the s-block. This adds up to 7 total valence electrons.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 28, 2019 5:08 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Lanthanides and Actinides
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: Lanthanides and Actinides

No, in my notes it says we need to know only the s-block, p-block, and the first row of the d block. The Lanthanides and Actinides are also omitted from the homework problems, so I don't think we will be asked about them.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sat Oct 26, 2019 1:16 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration Chart
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: Electron Configuration Chart

There are two exceptions to determining electron configuration from the periodic table: chromium and copper. In these two cases, a half-full or full d sublevel is more stable than its predicted configuration, so one electron from the s orbital moves to the d orbital.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:34 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Double Bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 58

Re: Double Bonds

If the formal charge on an atom is not equal to zero, that's a good indication that you will need a double bond at that location.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Fri Oct 25, 2019 12:13 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Week 5 Homework
Replies: 9
Views: 96

Re: Week 5 Homework

It says on the syllabus to do problems from recently covered material, so work on problems relating to chemical bonds.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:11 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Spin
Replies: 5
Views: 61

Re: Electron Spin

Each electron will only have one spin, and it will be either up or down. The quantum number for spin will not take on any values other than +1/2 and -1/2.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:07 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Homework Question
Replies: 2
Views: 49

Re: Homework Question

Yes, on the syllabus it says to do homework from recently covered material. Since we haven't started the next chapter yet, you should do work from Quantum World.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:49 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Memorizing electron configuration
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Memorizing electron configuration

They fill up from left to right on the periodic table. When it hits the transition metals though, remember to write them before 4s on the electron configuration because it is a lower energy level.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:44 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: determining types of orbitals (?)
Replies: 4
Views: 54

Re: determining types of orbitals (?)

groups 1 and 2 are s, groups 3-12 are d, and groups 13-18 are p. The inner transition elements that are placed separately are part the f subshell. Within the groups, you can count the numbers in to determine the subscript
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Frequencies
Replies: 7
Views: 105

Re: Frequencies

It also might help to memorize the visible light spectrum, as they might ask about what color a certain wavelength of light is.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:51 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Same spin
Replies: 10
Views: 113

Re: Same spin

It's also helpful to note that all electrons will have the same spin until there is no room in the subshell and electrons must pair up (paired electrons have opposite spin). This is explained by Hund's rule.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:27 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals vs. Shells
Replies: 5
Views: 57

Re: Orbitals vs. Shells

A shell is the broad term used to describe an energy level where the electrons reside (same value of n). Within a shell, there are subshells, which also have the same value for l. Orbitals are the specific term to describe where the electrons reside, such as in s or p.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 4:49 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave vs particle properties
Replies: 4
Views: 73

Re: Wave vs particle properties

The idea is that light acts as BOTH a wave and a particle. The diffraction of light through a slit explains it's wave-like properties, and the photoelectric effect supports the argument that it can also behave like a packet of light, or a particle. What helped me understand it was looking more into ...
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 4:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: type of light during p.e. experiment
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: type of light during p.e. experiment

UV light is most commonly used, since it's higher energy has a better chance at ejecting electrons. Hope this helps!
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 4:32 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Video Modules
Replies: 7
Views: 61

Re: Video Modules

Taking notes on the videos definitely helped me understand the material better before lectures. It's highly recommended and beneficial!
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 4:30 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: HW Question 1B.3
Replies: 2
Views: 40

Re: HW Question 1B.3

According to the photoelectric effect, light sources with long wavelengths cannot eject electrons, even if they have high intensity. This explains the idea that light acts as a series of packets.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 13, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: electron energy levels
Replies: 6
Views: 48

Re: electron energy levels

Electrons in the outermost shell take less energy to be removed because they have the weakest attraction to the nucleus. Additionally, they release the most energy when jumping to the innermost energy level.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:35 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Posts
Replies: 6
Views: 77

Re: Posts

The 5 posts should be finished before Sunday night, which marks the end of that week. Hope this helps!
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:33 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Dilution and Molarity in general
Replies: 1
Views: 38

Re: Dilution and Molarity in general

It's also helpful to know that molarity times volume is equal to moles, so mv=mv is essentially saying that initial # of moles = final # of moles.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:30 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Combustion
Replies: 17
Views: 508

Re: Combustion

Combustion is the reaction between a hydrocarbon and oxygen to produce a CO2 and H2O.
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:27 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: 50 Min test
Replies: 4
Views: 69

Re: 50 Min test

Just questions about the review of high school chemistry will be asked. Good luck!
by Kurtis Liang 3I
Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:26 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Homework G25
Replies: 1
Views: 39

Re: Homework G25

I would start by finding out how much solution there is after 10 mL is doubled 90 times. To do this, you would multiply 10mL by 2^90 to find the final volume.

Go to advanced search