Search found 20 matches

by eduardomorales5
Sat Oct 26, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 3
Views: 12

Electron Configuration

So how does Lavelle want us to write the electron configuration of transition metals? Like for instance Vanadium, does he want us to write it like [Ar]4s2 3d3 or [Ar]4s1 3d4?
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 25, 2019 7:09 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge

The equation is Zeff= Z-S, where Z is the atomic number and S is the number of shielding electrons(non-valence electrons).
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 25, 2019 7:01 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Post-assessment question 34
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Post-assessment question 34

I believe the answer was 1.00 x 10^5m/s, not the answer you gave. The rest of you answer is correct, in that it is reasonable because the electron is moving slower than the speed of light.
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:49 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: First vs. Second Ionization Energies
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: First vs. Second Ionization Energies

Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron from the valence shell. By removing one electron, there are more protons than electrons now, and thus the electrons are more tightly bound to the nucleus. Thus, the second ionization energy will be higher than the first now that it has t...
by eduardomorales5
Thu Oct 24, 2019 3:57 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: HW 2.A.1 (c) - valence electrons for elements in d block
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: HW 2.A.1 (c) - valence electrons for elements in d block

An element is most stable when its orbitals are full or half-full. In the case of Manganese, it has 7 valence electrons as you can see from its electron configuration [Ar]4s2 3d5, by counting the 2 electrons from the s-orbital and the 5 from the d-orbital. Because it is at a half filled d-orbital, i...
by eduardomorales5
Thu Oct 24, 2019 3:48 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 2A.5: What happens with s and d orbitals?
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: 2A.5: What happens with s and d orbitals?

The electron configurations of Thallium is [Xe]4f14 5d10 6s2 6p1. Because it is Tl^+3, Thallium has lost 3 electrons. You remove the electrons in the order of the highest energy level, which in this case, is n=6. When you take the 3 away, you are left with [Xe]4f14 5d10.
by eduardomorales5
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:06 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Shared Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 29

Re: Shared Electrons

Hund's Rule tells us that because of the repulsion of electrons, they will first try to occupy different orbitals while having parallel spin, which has less energy than opposite spin electrons. Because there are 3 p orbitals, they will try to fill up each orbital first until they other electrons beg...
by eduardomorales5
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:50 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: h bar formula [ENDORSED]
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: h bar formula [ENDORSED]

The more correct one to use is the h/4pi.
by eduardomorales5
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration
Replies: 5
Views: 19

Electron Configuration

What exactly is the order that electrons fill up orbitals? With what atoms do we start using the d-orbital?
by eduardomorales5
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:44 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Quantum Numbers
Replies: 7
Views: 58

Quantum Numbers

How do we know when to put the spin number? How does an electron's spin affect its behavior?
by eduardomorales5
Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:43 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Wavelength and Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: Wavelength and Electrons

The wavelength of an electron is Wavelength=10^-12m
by eduardomorales5
Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: History of the QM Equations
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: History of the QM Equations

The three fundamental equations were developed in the 1920s.
by eduardomorales5
Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:39 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Diffraction
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Diffraction

Constructive interference is when the peaks and troughs of two waves match and thus increase the amplitude of the wave.
by eduardomorales5
Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:34 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Planck's constant
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Planck's constant

Yes Lavelle explained it within his video modules.
by eduardomorales5
Sat Oct 12, 2019 7:33 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Weight of Particles
Replies: 4
Views: 27

Re: Weight of Particles

The mass of an electron is 9.109x10^-31. The mass of a proton and neutron is 1.67x10^-27.
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:45 am
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Bond Length
Replies: 5
Views: 38

Re: Bond Length

Bond length is the distance between the nuclei of two bonded atoms.
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:43 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Final Jitters
Replies: 61
Views: 18346

Re: Final Jitters

Make sure you study repeatedly over a long period of time. Don't cram the night before or that will contribute to your anxieties. Sleep and eat well, and take deep breathes to calm yourself down. Before the test, it is best not to think about it at all to avoid starting up any unnecessary anxiety. W...
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:36 am
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: When should one start rounding in a problem?
Replies: 11
Views: 66

Re: When should one start rounding in a problem?

It is best to round by the end of the problem and keep the precision of numbers during the problem to reach a more accurate answer. If you round too early, you might get a slightly lower or higher answer than what is correct. I would keep it at 1.007 for the sake of accuracy.
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:35 am
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Why do we always need grams when solving a problem?
Replies: 6
Views: 47

Re: Why do we always need grams when solving a problem?

It is the accepted base SI unit that helps to standardize measurements so that scientists can more easily compare their findings using the same unit measurement.
by eduardomorales5
Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:30 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: How does one read sig figs?
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: How does one read sig figs?

Any non-zero number is significant. A zero is significant if it precedes the decimal point (e.g. 0.2) or if after the decimal point, precedes a non-zero(e.g. 0.004). So it given 500400, it would have 4 sig figs because the two zeroes in the middle precedes a non-zero, which in this case is 4. The ze...

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