Search found 50 matches

by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:11 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Question 9C8
Replies: 1
Views: 35

Re: Question 9C8

It can be a chelating complex as long as there are two bonds from the same ligand and there is a loop or ring formed.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:07 am
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Kw
Replies: 2
Views: 83

Re: Kw

Kw would be used in problems that involve calculating the pH. I do not believe that we have to know it that well in this class; I think it is more emphasized in 14B.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:03 am
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong vs Weak Acids and Bases
Replies: 5
Views: 86

Re: Strong vs Weak Acids and Bases

There are only six strong acids, so I've always found it easiest to memorize them. They are: HCl, HNO 3 , H 2 SO 4 , HBr, HI, HClO 3 , and HClO 3 . Since they're strong acids, these six will completely ionize in water. Be sure to know all the other properties of these strong acids, too. What proper...
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:53 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Acids and Bases Lists
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Acids and Bases Lists

Is there a specific list of strong acids and bases that we have to know?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:27 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Grading
Replies: 3
Views: 88

Re: Grading

Yes it is.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:01 am
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong vs Weak Acids and Bases
Replies: 5
Views: 86

Re: Strong vs Weak Acids and Bases

The higher the electronegativity of the element, the stronger the acid is for binary acids. The more oxygens attached to a central atom, the stronger the acid is for oxoacids.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 30, 2019 10:09 am
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Amphoteric vs. Amphiprotic
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: Amphoteric vs. Amphiprotic

Amphiprotic refers to substances that are able to accept and donate a proton or Hydrogen ion. All amphoteric substances can be considered amphiprotic. Amphoteric refers to the ability to act as an acid and a base. All amphiprotic substances cannot be considered amphoteric.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Thu Nov 28, 2019 9:57 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Acid Strength
Replies: 6
Views: 71

Acid Strength

Is there any way of telling whether an acid is strong or weak other than memorizing the list of strong acids?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Thu Nov 28, 2019 9:30 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Denticity
Replies: 2
Views: 33

Re: Denticity

The easiest way to do it is to look for Nitrogen molecules and COOs and find their available binding sites. For example, if Nitrogen has 3 bonds, this means it has one lone pair that acts as a binding site. A monodentate has one binding site, bidentate has two, and so on.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Thu Nov 28, 2019 9:09 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis v Bronsted acids/bases
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Lewis v Bronsted acids/bases

Anything that accepts a pair of electrons is called a Lewis acid, and anything that accepts pairs of electrons at an acidic hydrogen is considered a Bronsted acid. Lewis acids can be considered generalizations of Bronsted acids.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:20 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: 9C. 7
Replies: 2
Views: 27

Re: 9C. 7

A complex between a metal and a polydentate ligand is a chelating complex. For this situation, there are 2 binding sites on each isomer. The nitrogens have to be close enough to complex to the same metal atom, so it would have to be (b).
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:17 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C. 9
Replies: 1
Views: 25

Re: 9C. 9

The coordination number is the number of bonds on the central atom.
(a) 4
(b) 2
(c) 6
(d) 6
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:15 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C. 5
Replies: 1
Views: 25

Re: 9C. 5

(a) Tridentate ligand because the 3 Nitrogens have lone pairs.
(b) Mono/bidentate ligand because it can bind to one or two oxygen atoms.
(c) Monodentate ligand because oxygen can only bind to one more atom
(d) bidentate ligand because 2 oxygen have a double bond and 2 others have a single bond
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 2:07 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Orbital overlap
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: Orbital overlap

A head-on overlap is formed by sigma bonds. Pi bonds are able to form side-to-side overlaps.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 24, 2019 1:45 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: d-orbitals
Replies: 7
Views: 56

Re: d-orbitals

Yes, the 3d orbital is able to sp3d hybrid orbital
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:29 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Repulsion
Replies: 3
Views: 46

Repulsion

Do we have to know the repulsion strengths between atoms?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Melting Points
Replies: 7
Views: 59

Melting Points

Do we have to know the melting points of all the different interactions?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Bond Angles

How do you calculate the bond angles for molecules?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:17 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Different Types of Bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Different Types of Bonds

Why are all bonds (single, double, and triple) treated as equal in VSEPR?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:14 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 6
Views: 40

Hydrogen Bonding

Is hydrogen bonding considered a dipole-dipole interaction, or is it different?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:01 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F. 19
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: 3F. 19

(a) xenon is able to support larger dipole moments than argon; it is also larger so it is more polarizable, and London interactions are larger as well (b) diethyl ether molecules have larger London interactions than water molecules, and have weaker dipole-dipole forces; water has strong hydrogen bon...
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:48 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F. 15
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: 3F. 15

The difference in boiling points between these two compounds is due to the difference in dipole moments and electronegativity.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:46 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F. 3
Replies: 1
Views: 19

Re: 3F. 3

To answer this question, you must determine which compounds have dipole-dipole interactions. It cannot be A or E since both are non polar. B, C, and D are possibilities because they are polar.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:43 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F. 5
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: 3F. 5

When you are comparing melting points, you have to analyze the intermolecular forces of the molecules; each force has a different melting point.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 10, 2019 12:37 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F. 1
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: 3F. 1

You have to determine whether hydrogen bonding, London forces, or dipole-dipole interactions can occur. Here are some rules to guide you: London dispersion forces are between any non-polar molecules, dipole-dipole interactions are between any polar molecules, and dipole-induced dipole forces are pre...
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Nov 03, 2019 6:05 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Configuration Rules
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Electron Configuration Rules

Can someone please explain Pauli's Exclusion Principle and Hund's Rule? Thanks!
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:24 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Titanium valence electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Titanium valence electrons

Since it is a transition metal, the amount of valence electrons the element has can vary.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:17 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Energy change and Energy of photon
Replies: 5
Views: 52

Re: Energy change and Energy of photon

The change in energy would be negative because it is going from a higher energy state to a lower energy state. It is important to remember that only the change in energy can be negative, not energy itself.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:15 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg Indeterminacy Equation
Replies: 6
Views: 199

Re: Heisenberg Indeterminacy Equation

4 pi is a constant that was produced from an experiment. It stems from the idea that most graphs of waves involve the sine curve, which is usually graphed using pi.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Nov 02, 2019 12:11 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 6
Views: 71

Re: Work Function

A work function is the same thing as the threshold energy, which is the minimum amount of energy needed to remove an electron from a metal; it will usually be given to you in a problem. Since energy is measured in Joules, the units of the work function would be in Joules.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration Exceptions
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Electron Configuration Exceptions

Could someone please explain how Chromium and Copper are exceptions to the general rules of electron configuration? Thanks!
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Magnetic Spin Quantum Number
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Magnetic Spin Quantum Number

I'm confused on how to determine the magnetic spin quantum. I know it can be -1/2 or 1/2, but how do you determine which one it is?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:30 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: General Question about bond lengths
Replies: 1
Views: 34

Re: General Question about bond lengths

Electron repulsion does play a role in this; however, it does not impact double bonds as much as it impacts a lone pair. Therefore, electron repulsion doesn't have as strong of an impact on double bonds since they involve shared electrons.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:25 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence Electrons in D-block
Replies: 1
Views: 23

Re: Valence Electrons in D-block

The valence electrons for the d-block can vary between 1-2, but it is usually two. This is because the transition metals have multiple oxidative states. There is an endorsed post titled "Determining valence electrons for d-block elements" if you would like more extensive answers.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 26, 2019 12:04 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge and Ionization Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Effective Nuclear Charge and Ionization Energy

Yes, as the effective nuclear charge increases, the ionization energy increases as well. This makes it harder for electrons to be removed.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:32 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Overlapping
Replies: 4
Views: 61

Re: Overlapping

Yes, they are able to overlap. There does not have to be specifically double probability of finding electrons there, but there will be a higher probability.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:30 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: p- orbital
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: p- orbital

The p x orbital is filled first, which is horizontal to the atom. Then, the p y orbital is filled, which is vertical to the atom. Finally, the p z orbital is filled, which is from the front to the back of the atom. However, each position must have one electron each before being filled with two elect...
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:22 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Shared Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 73

Shared Electrons

During lecture, Dr. Lavelle said it would be better to write out px , py, etc. in order to be specific about whether the electrons are paired or not. How are you able to tell if electrons are paired so that you know to write it like this?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:18 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy increasing
Replies: 7
Views: 126

Re: Energy increasing

So how would an increase/decrease in energy level affect the orbitals (s, p, d, f)? Does energy level determine the orbitals?
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:11 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Structure of electrons
Replies: 5
Views: 35

Re: Structure of electrons

Orbitals make up sub-shells; they are not the same thing. Orbitals are composed of electrons that have the same energy level, shape, and orientation. Electrons that have the same orbital shape are in the same sub-shell.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:56 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave Properties of Electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Wave Properties of Electrons

Does the pattern of a wave (such as constructive or destructive) matter in any problems/questions? Does it affect the properties of the electrons? Thanks!
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:42 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wavelength
Replies: 4
Views: 58

Re: Wavelength

When waves are longer, they travel slower so they have less energy. Shorter waves travel faster, and, therefore, have much more energy.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:38 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Quantum Levels
Replies: 9
Views: 95

Re: Quantum Levels

There is not a set maximum limit on the number of quantum levels there can be; it continues to increase with energy.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:35 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Intensity of Light
Replies: 4
Views: 73

Re: Intensity of Light

In order to increase the number of photons, you would have to increase the power of the source that is supplying the energy, which would increase its intensity.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:24 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Speed of an Electron
Replies: 3
Views: 62

Re: Speed of an Electron

When you are adding energy to an electron, you will notice it going faster and faster, but, as it gets closer to the speed of light, you will find that it requires a much higher input of energy to make it a bit faster. Therefore, it would be reasonable if the speed is lower than the speed of light, ...
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:55 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: States of Matter
Replies: 9
Views: 266

States of Matter

Do the states of matter in a chemical equation (gas, liquid, aqueous, solid) matter when we are solving problems for molarity/dilution? Is there anything we have to do to account for the differences in forms? Thanks!
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:45 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: HW E.23
Replies: 3
Views: 23

HW E.23

Can someone please help me out with part (a) and (c) from E.23? Do you have to do the problem a different way when ions are involved? Thanks!
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:13 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test #1
Replies: 3
Views: 110

Re: Test #1

Our first test is going to be covering general high school chemistry from the first four modules that were assigned. I believe that it will consistent of practice problems rather than vocabulary. It will be 50 minutes, worth 50 points, and consist of 7 questions.
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:11 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Compound Formulas
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Re: Compound Formulas

From my understanding, we don't need to know any formulas by heart at this moment. Dr. Lavelle stated that he would be providing a formula sheet for anything we may need to memorize. However, it may change in the upcoming weeks or the next classes in the series. I am sure Dr. Lavelle would inform us...
by Ramneet Sandhu 3D
Tue Oct 01, 2019 6:04 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Empirical and Molecular Formulas
Replies: 13
Views: 208

Empirical and Molecular Formulas

This is a pretty general question, but how do you know how to tell whether you are given an empirical formula or a molecular formula in a problem?

Go to advanced search