Search found 103 matches

by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:06 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Molecularity
Replies: 4
Views: 37

Re: Molecularity

The molecularity of a reaction is defined as the number of molecules or ions that participate in the rate-determining step.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:06 pm
Forum: *Enzyme Kinetics
Topic: Adsorption vs. Absorption
Replies: 7
Views: 62

Re: Adsorption vs. Absorption

Absorption is the process in which a fluid is dissolved by a liquid or a solid (absorbent). Adsorption is the process in which atoms, ions or molecules from a substance (it could be gas, liquid or dissolved solid) adhere to a surface of the adsorbent.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:05 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Temperature and Reaction Rate
Replies: 6
Views: 39

Re: Temperature and Reaction Rate

As you increase the temperature the rate of reaction increases. As a rough approximation, for many reactions happening at around room temperature, the rate of reaction doubles for every 10°C rise in temperature.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:03 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Frequency Factor
Replies: 6
Views: 40

Re: Frequency Factor

The pre-exponential factor (A) is part of the Arrhenius equation, which was formulated by the Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius in 1889. The pre-exponential factor is also known as the frequency factor and represents the frequency of collisions between reactant molecules. Although often described as ...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:02 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: 7D.1
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: 7D.1

The equation ln(k2/k1)=-Ea/R*(1/T2-1/T1) should be able to be used.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:20 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6L.9
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: 6L.9

Since both K and Cl would dissolve in the water, they wouldn't be present in the half-reactions.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:16 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Question 6.65
Replies: 2
Views: 57

Re: Question 6.65

I think you need to use 10^-14 because that's where you would compare ph 14 and 1. If you use that in the denominator and numerator you should get +.828 and -.828, respectively.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:13 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: catalyst
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: catalyst

Catalysts are present as reactants in the very beginning and products at the end. Intermediates, on the other hand, are not present in the initial reaction but are produced within one of the steps and then consumed within another step. Also, catalysts are used throughout the reaction. So according t...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:12 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: delta G, pressure and. K
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: delta G, pressure and. K

I think this explains it well:
https://chem.libretexts.org/Bookshelves ... rown_et_al.)/19%3A_Chemical_Thermodynamics/19.7%3A_Free_Energy_and_the_Equilibrium_Constant

Essentially they are all linked through an equation.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:09 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6L.3 part d
Replies: 1
Views: 46

Re: 6L.3 part d

I think the reason why O2 and H+ are on the same side is because the reaction would not be oxidizing if it was either
H+ -> O2 or
O2 -> H+
The equation has to be H2O -> O2 + H+ because then the reaction will be oxidizing for H in H2O -> H+
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:02 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Inert electrode
Replies: 9
Views: 69

Re: Inert electrode

Whenever the anode/cathode has no solids in its half-reaction.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 3:01 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6M.11
Replies: 4
Views: 58

Re: 6M.11

The phases are usually given in the equation. You can use those same ones in writing the cell diagram.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 2:59 pm
Forum: Interesting Applications: Rechargeable Batteries (Cell Phones, Notebooks, Cars), Fuel Cells (Space Shuttle), Photovoltaic Cells (Solar Panels), Electrolysis, Rust
Topic: 6N.21
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Re: 6N.21

This is more of a conceptual question. The chapter itself talks about it in the last section, so we probably just have to understand the general idea.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Mar 06, 2020 2:54 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Forward and reverse reaction rates
Replies: 4
Views: 40

Re: Forward and reverse reaction rates

We use k vs k' to differentiate between the rates for forward and reverse reactions.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Feb 19, 2020 7:02 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: 5G.21
Replies: 4
Views: 114

5G.21

5G.21 Calculate the equilibrium constant at 25 8C for each of the following reactions, by using data in Appendix 2A: (a) the combustion of hydrogen: 2 H2(g) 1 O2(g) Δ 2 H2O(g) (b) the oxidation of carbon monoxide: 2 CO(g) 1O2(g) Δ 2 CO2(g) (c) the decomposition of limestone: CaCO3(s) Δ CaO(s) 1 CO2(...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:32 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Standard Gibbs Free Energy Conditions
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: Standard Gibbs Free Energy Conditions

The standard state is 298 K or 25 degrees C.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:31 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Concentration Cell
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Re: Concentration Cell

Concentration cells are of two types: 1. Electrode concentration cells: In these cells, the potential difference is developed between two electrodes at different concentrations dipped in the same solution of the electrolyte. For example, two hydrogen electrodes at different gaseous pressures in the ...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:29 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Redox Reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Redox Reactions

An oxidizing agent is the substance that causes the oxidation in another substance. Common oxidizing agents include oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and halogens. A reducing agent is a substance that causes another substance to reduce. So to identify an oxidizing agent, simply look at the oxidation number ...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:28 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: 5.55
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: 5.55

The standard Gibbs free energy of molecules is 0 for any element in its standard state.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 7:26 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: reaction at equilibrium
Replies: 6
Views: 48

Re: reaction at equilibrium

No work is being done at equilibrium so the delta G value is 0.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 4:51 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: delta vs. delta naught
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Re: delta vs. delta naught

The difference between the two is that delta G naught is at standard conditions. The reason Professor Lavelle emphasized it is because delta G naught is always the same because it is referring to when the reactants/products are at standard temperature/pressure. As the rxn goes towards equilibrium, d...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 4:48 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Reversible and Irreversible
Replies: 5
Views: 133

Re: Reversible and Irreversible

Yes, since entropy is a state function, the second law can be applied to irreversible reactions.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 4:47 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.
Replies: 4
Views: 97

Re: Heat Capacity for Calorimeters.

The difference between the two is that a regular calorimeter is simply a "thermally insulated container" while in a bomb calorimeter, the reaction takes place in a sealed metal container that is immersed in water in an insulated container.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 18, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Units of Partial Pressure in 5G-13, 5G-15
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: Units of Partial Pressure in 5G-13, 5G-15

Calculating the Q value with partial pressures gives you an answer without units. Therefore, it isn't necessary to convert the values in bars.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Feb 11, 2020 8:57 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Expansion Work
Replies: 6
Views: 122

Expansion Work

How do we tell if a reaction does expansion work or not?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:21 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Thermodynamics
Replies: 6
Views: 74

Re: Thermodynamics

Yup, both would be negative.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 1:14 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: sapling problems assignment 3
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: sapling problems assignment 3

C in C∆T is heat capacity, while C in mC∆T is specific heat (Cs). C = mass x Cs, so those two equations are essentially equivalent. You use heat capacity when you don't have a total mass. That is if you know the total mass of the system, you can use the specific heat capacity. In most problems where...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 1:09 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Thermodynamics
Replies: 6
Views: 74

Re: Thermodynamics

Heat transfer to a system is positive, and heat transfer from a system is negative. W is positive if work is done by the system, and negative if work is done on the system.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 1:08 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Entropy V.S Enthalpy QUestion
Replies: 3
Views: 40

Re: Entropy V.S Enthalpy QUestion

I think the table on this page does a good job of answering your question, though it also depends on temperature:

https://opentextbc.ca/introductorychemi ... erature-2/
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 1:05 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Textbook question 4D.9
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Textbook question 4D.9

To get energy density in kJ/L from kJ/L, you divide the amount of energy with the mass of one mole of TNT and multiply it by the density of TNT. The answer should be 23.9 x 10^3 kJ/L.

3292 / 227.13 x 1650=23.9 x 10^3 kJ/L
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Feb 06, 2020 1:01 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Textbook question 4B.3
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: Textbook question 4B.3

I got 490 J as well. I believe the answer in the book is wrong.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:30 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Degeneracy
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Degeneracy

I found this online: "Degeneracy plays a fundamental role in quantum statistical mechanics. For an N-particle system in three dimensions, a single energy level may correspond to several different wave functions or energy states. These degenerate states at the same level are all equally probable...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:28 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Textbook question 4D.3
Replies: 1
Views: 36

Re: Textbook question 4D.3

The heat of the reaction is equal to the negative heat of the calorimeter because the calorimeter is gaining heat from the reaction. Hence to calculate heat gained by the calorimeter, we use C(delta T). The question asks for the internal energy change for the reaction of 1.00 mol CO. We are given 1....
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Self-Test 6A.3A
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: Self-Test 6A.3A

Basically, because hydroiodic acid is a strong acid, it dissociates completely in an aqueous solution. This means that the hydronium concentration is equivalent to the initial molarity of the acid. The back of the book represented this value in micromoles, so instead of just writing it as 6.0x10^-5,...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:26 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Textbook question 4D.9
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Textbook question 4D.9

That is correct the O2 and N2 are diatomic gases in their most stable form and thus their standard enthalpy of formation is zero. Using the enthalpies of formation we calculate that CO2 requires -393.51 kJ/mol while H20 requires -241.82. Given TNT's enthalpy of formation we calculate: 28(-393.51 kJ/...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Feb 01, 2020 1:23 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: q and delta H
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: q and delta H

q is the amount of heat transferred to a system whereas is used to describe the change in enthalpy. Enthalpy is the total potential energy of a system, which is associated with the heat transferred to/from a system (q). However, at constant pressure which can make it difficult to see the difference ...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 4:08 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy vs. Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Enthalpy vs. Energy

Enthalpy is equal to the system's internal energy plus the product of its pressure and volume. In a closed system, the heat absorbed or released equals the change in enthalpy.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 4:06 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: using volume in calculations
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: using volume in calculations

Yup, you assume that its a cylinder.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 4:03 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Method 3
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: Method 3

As long as pressure is at 1 atm and the temperature is 25 degrees Celsius, the reaction is in standard state.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Jan 26, 2020 4:02 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Enthalpies
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: Enthalpies

The standard enthalpy of formation is the change in enthalpy that accompanies the formation of one mole of the compound from its elements. The standard enthalpy of reaction occurs in a system when one mole of matter is transformed by a chemical reaction.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Jan 18, 2020 5:33 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6D. 7
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: 6D. 7

To start this problem, you would need to convert the pH into molarity by using 10^-4.60. Then, set up an ICE table with the molarity found as the H3O+ equilibrium concentration. Set the initial condition of HClO to x then subtract the molarity found from that, which will be the final equilibrium of ...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Jan 18, 2020 5:22 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Pressure
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: Pressure

A change in pressure or volume will result in an attempt to restore equilibrium by creating more or less moles of gas. For example, if the pressure in a system increases or the volume decreases, the equilibrium will shift to favor the side of the reaction that involves fewer moles of gas.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Jan 18, 2020 5:21 pm
Forum: *Making Buffers & Calculating Buffer pH (Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation)
Topic: Buffer questions
Replies: 4
Views: 76

Re: Buffer questions

If buffer questions were covered in either the chemical equilibrium or acids/bases outlines, then we probably have to know them.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Jan 18, 2020 5:20 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G.1
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: 5G.1

Yup, temperature is the one thing that would affect the K value.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Jan 18, 2020 5:19 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6D. 13
Replies: 2
Views: 59

Re: 6D. 13

B) C) D) are weak so you can calculate their pH using a regular ICE box.

A) is a strong acid so its pH is simply -log(0.00005)
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:25 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Reaction Direction
Replies: 5
Views: 55

Re: Reaction Direction

Q, which is the reactant quotient, is used to identify the direction of the reaction. By comparing the Q value, which is found with the same equation as the K value, with the K value, you can identify the direction. If Q < K then the reaction proceeds forwards but if Q > K then the reverse reaction ...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:21 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Clarification on Q<K and R&P concentrations
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: Clarification on Q<K and R&P concentrations

Q is mainly used to determine the favored reaction direction. It doesn't necessarily signify that the reactants or products have a higher or less concentration than one another.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:18 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: How to find stability based off of equilibrium concentrations
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: How to find stability based off of equilibrium concentrations

A large equilibrium constant favors the products of dissociation, which means F2 would tend to split apart into two F and is therefore unstable. So, in comparison, Cl2 is more stable.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:17 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: reactants compared to products
Replies: 4
Views: 47

Re: reactants compared to products

The equilibrium constant would be smaller with a higher concentration of reactants since the reactants make up the denominator of the formula.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Jan 08, 2020 5:13 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: units
Replies: 3
Views: 54

Re: units

By definition, the equilibrium constant has no units, as we're supposed to be using active masses instead of the molarity/ concentrations of the respective substances.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Dec 08, 2019 6:22 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet exception
Replies: 13
Views: 385

Re: Octet exception

Any element beyond Na would have the exception.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Dec 08, 2019 6:21 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: 50 post grade
Replies: 25
Views: 694

Re: 50 post grade

I think it depends on your TA.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Dec 08, 2019 6:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR of S02
Replies: 4
Views: 125

Re: VSEPR of S02

Yup, bent and AX2E
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Dec 08, 2019 6:19 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Class Grading
Replies: 44
Views: 1707

Re: Class Grading

I hope he ends up curving the class.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:15 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: ClF4+ Lewis Structure
Replies: 2
Views: 269

ClF4+ Lewis Structure

Why does the lewis structure for ClF4+ place a formal charge of -1 on the central Cl atom when you could double bond one of the F atoms and move the formal charge of -1 to one of the non-central atoms?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Nov 27, 2019 4:36 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphoteric Compounds other than Be, Al, Ga, Sn, Pb, and Sb
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Amphoteric Compounds other than Be, Al, Ga, Sn, Pb, and Sb

The definition of amphoteric is a species that is able to act as both a base and acid, which means it should be able to accept and donate a proton when need be. The easiest way to remember is if the elements in question are part of the metalloid oxides section of the periodic table as opposed to the...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Nov 27, 2019 4:33 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Acids
Replies: 13
Views: 198

Re: Acids

He will probably ask questions about acid/base strength based on the list given. As long as you know how to find strength, you would be able to answer the questions based on those 7.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Nov 27, 2019 4:30 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Inorganic vs organic
Replies: 5
Views: 57

Re: Inorganic vs organic

Acids and bases containing carbon are known as organic. Acids and bases that DO NOT contain carbon are known as inorganic.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Nov 27, 2019 4:29 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Simple Definitions
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: Simple Definitions

A coordination complex is the product of a Lewis acid-base reaction in which neutral molecules or anions (called ligands) bond to a central metal atom (or ion) by coordinate covalent bonds. Compounds that contain a coordination complex are called coordination compounds. Ligands are Lewis bases - the...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Wed Nov 27, 2019 4:28 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: EDTA
Replies: 8
Views: 82

Re: EDTA

EDTA is used for chelation therapy. Chelation means "to grab" or "to bind." When EDTA is injected into the veins, it "grabs" heavy metals and minerals such as lead, mercury, copper, iron, arsenic, aluminum, and calcium and removes them from the body. It is used to treat...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Nov 19, 2019 4:22 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: SO3(2-)
Replies: 3
Views: 37

SO3(2-)

Is SO3(2-) polar or nonpolar?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Nov 19, 2019 3:55 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F.1 C
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: 3F.1 C

Molecular size determines intermolecular interaction strength. Since Iodine is a larger atom than Fluorine, it has stronger intermolecular strength and therefore a higher melting point.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Nov 19, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Test 2 related HW problems
Replies: 2
Views: 77

Re: Test 2 related HW problems

The questions on the syllabus from 3F, 2E, and anything that covers sigma and pi bonds, so 2F.1 will cover topics on the test.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Nov 19, 2019 3:49 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Thiosulfate Ion
Replies: 4
Views: 36

Re: Thiosulfate Ion

If the formal charges should be on the atom with the greatest electronegativity, then shouldn't the double bonds be to one oxygen and one sulfur? Then the other two oxygen would both have a formal charge of -1.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Nov 19, 2019 1:36 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Thiosulfate Ion
Replies: 4
Views: 36

Re: Thiosulfate Ion

That would create a formal charge of -1 on both the single-bonded oxygen and sulfur. If you put double bonds on all of them, it would create a formal charge of -2 on the central sulfur. Isn't that identical in terms of formal charge?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Nov 19, 2019 12:38 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Thiosulfate Ion
Replies: 4
Views: 36

Thiosulfate Ion

What is the lewis dot structure for a thiosulfate ion? I drew it with a Sulfur in the middle with double bonds to three oxygen and the other sulfur. This would give the central sulfur a -2 formal charge.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Nov 16, 2019 6:00 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance Structures
Replies: 1
Views: 104

Re: Resonance Structures

CO has 10 valence electrons in total. A triple bond would be 6 electrons and a lone pair on both the C and the O would add another 4, making 10 total while also fulfilling the octet rule for both.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:58 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 7
Views: 84

Re: Polarity

CCl4 has a tetrahedral shape that is symmetrical. Therefore, the bond polarity is canceled out.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Nov 14, 2019 1:17 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Rotation of Polar Molecules in Dipole-Dipole Forces
Replies: 1
Views: 41

Rotation of Polar Molecules in Dipole-Dipole Forces

How does the rotation of various energy orientations work in dipole-dipole forces? Essentially, what does the explanation for figure 3F.5 mean?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Nov 14, 2019 1:16 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole-Dipole vs. Ion-Dipole
Replies: 2
Views: 52

Dipole-Dipole vs. Ion-Dipole

Why does the strength of the interaction in dipole-dipole forces depend more heavily on distance than the strength of interaction in ion-dipole forces?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Nov 14, 2019 1:12 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Ion-Dipole
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Ion-Dipole

Does a larger extent of hydration mean a stronger intermolecular attraction?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:47 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: central atom
Replies: 21
Views: 190

Re: central atom

What do you do for exceptions? Such as in an atom consisting of N and O, which would be the central atom? O technically has the lower ionization energy than N. Does the number of desired bonds matter when considering the central atom more than the electronegativity? I believe the atom with the lowe...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:45 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: test 2
Replies: 16
Views: 144

Re: test 2

Also, is test 2 worth the same amount as test 1?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:44 pm
Forum: *Liquid Structure (Viscosity, Surface Tension, Liquid Crystals, Ionic Liquids)
Topic: Viscosity
Replies: 15
Views: 304

Re: Viscosity

The viscosity of a fluid is a measure of its resistance to deformation at a given rate. Liquids with high viscosity have more of a resistance to deformation.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:43 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: polarizability and polarizing power
Replies: 4
Views: 48

Re: polarizability and polarizing power

Polarizing power follows the same trend as electronegativity while polarizability follows the trend of atomic radius.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 10, 2019 10:41 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bond Strength
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Bond Strength

Giving electrons is a lot stronger than sharing electrons.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 11:28 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: rydberg equation
Replies: 2
Views: 53

Re: rydberg equation

What's the way Lavelle taught us how to solve it?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 11:25 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: ionization energy vs electronegativity
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: ionization energy vs electronegativity

Ionization energy: the energy required to remove an electron from a neutral atom.
Electronegativity: the ability of an atom in a molecule to draw bonding electrons to itself.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 9:39 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Ch.1 #41 [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 635

Re: Ch.1 #41 [ENDORSED]

The answer is 3956 m/s.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:58 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Question 1.15 on homework
Replies: 11
Views: 4271

Re: Question 1.15 on homework

How can you tell that the transition is in the Lyman series from the fact that it is in the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen? Lyman series are the only series found in the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen. By knowing that the transition is in the ultraviolet spectrum allows us to know...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Nov 03, 2019 5:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW #1.7
Replies: 5
Views: 441

Re: HW #1.7

SammiOrsini_1B wrote:I think i am a little confused too. I thought there were 10^-9 meters in a nanometer and 10^-12 meters in picometer.


This should be right. Use dimensional analysis with these numbers in order to convert from meters to nanometers/picometers.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:58 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: p-orbitals
Replies: 11
Views: 105

Re: p-orbitals

If we're writing a larger p-orbital values, can we use a noble gas to substitute? Ex. [Ne]3s^1
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Double and single bond lengths
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: Double and single bond lengths

The double bond consists of two types of bonds, the pi bond and the sigma bond. The sigma bond is stronger than the pi bond which results in a shorter bond length. As for a triple bond, there are two pi bonds and one sigma bond, which results in an even shorter bond length. What is the difference b...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:52 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization energy vs. electron affinity
Replies: 1
Views: 31

Re: Ionization energy vs. electron affinity

I don't exactly know what questions will be asked about the two but they are different. Ionization energy refers to the amount of energy necessary to remove the outermost electron of an atom or molecule. Electron affinity refers to the amount of energy necessary for a neutral ion to gain an electron...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:49 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Homework
Replies: 13
Views: 176

Re: Homework

Nathan Rothschild_3D wrote:I would recommend doing it on the chemical bonds section but since part of this last week included the quantum realm, it should still be okay to do some problems from that section.

From what I've seen, this is right. It should be okay to do problems from either section.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:43 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Bonds
Replies: 11
Views: 104

Re: Covalent Bonds

504939134 wrote:Covalent bonds can only be formed by nonmetals, and metals are more likely to form ionic bonds. Remember that metals often times become cations because it is easier for them to give up electrons. Non metals have high ionization energy.

Nonmetals can also form ionic bonds, right?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:19 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Quantum Numbers
Replies: 9
Views: 73

Re: Quantum Numbers

I believe they are used in more complicated experiments and more detailed chemistry, but in terms of this class, we probably won't be going over them since those elements don't come up.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: paired and parallel electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Re: paired and parallel electrons

When two electrons are parallel, both will be having the same spin or both going up/going down. When two electrons are paired, they will have opposite spins, one going up and one going down. If two electrons are in the same orbital they will always have opposite spins (paired). If they are in two di...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:16 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Subshell Exceptions
Replies: 6
Views: 106

Re: Subshell Exceptions

"Exceptions are based on the fact that half-full or full shells or subshells are more stable than partially filled ones. When the difference in energy levels between two subshells is small, an electron may transfer to the higher level shell to fill or half-fill it. The electron occupies the hig...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 20, 2019 2:56 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Sodium Vapor Lamps (1.19 hw) [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 8512

Re: Sodium Vapor Lamps (1.19 hw) [ENDORSED]

Ohhhh, just got it. Thank you!
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Tue Oct 15, 2019 11:56 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Sodium Vapor Lamps (1.19 hw) [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 8512

Re: Sodium Vapor Lamps (1.19 hw) [ENDORSED]

b) First, you convert mg to g 5.00 mg * (1g/1000mg) = 5.00 x 10^-3 g of Na Since, it's asking for the how much energy is emitted by an excited SODIUM, you use the molar mass of Na 5.00x10^-3 g Na * (1 mol Na/ 23g Na) * (6.022 x10^23 atoms Na/ 1 g Na) = 1.31 x10^20 atoms of Na (1.31 x10^20 atoms Na)...
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: How to find my posts
Replies: 48
Views: 47262

Re: How to find my posts

You can find your grades on the study list on myUCLA. Next to each class is a link to your grades for that class.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:33 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Final Jitters
Replies: 118
Views: 31258

Re: Final Jitters

Getting a good night's sleep is important and helps me with anxiety before tests.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 13, 2019 9:30 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Frequency, Wavelength, Amplitude, and Velocity
Replies: 4
Views: 61

Re: Frequency, Wavelength, Amplitude, and Velocity

Velocity is a product of wavelength and frequency in terms of wavelength.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:30 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: knowing how many sig figs to use
Replies: 17
Views: 231

Re: knowing how many sig figs to use

Is it usually safe to have four decimal places for calculations and answers?
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Sun Oct 13, 2019 8:26 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7951
Views: 1216758

Re: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here

How often do I tell chemistry jokes? Periodically!
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:16 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: E 27
Replies: 6
Views: 96

Re: E 27

Yup, that's what I got too.
by Aman Sankineni 2L
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:06 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: E 29 part c
Replies: 8
Views: 1117

Re: E 29 part c

Because it is just the percentage of mass of oxygen, then the original mass of 8.61g copper(II) chloride tetrahydrate doesn't matter. No matter how many grams of the sample you have the percentage mass of oxygen should always be the same because of the molar ratios. Correct me if I'm wrong! Yup, th...

Go to advanced search