Search found 63 matches

by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:02 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: ICE tables
Replies: 9
Views: 39

Re: ICE tables

It does not matter which unit is given, ICE table works as long as we keep the unit the same through out the calculation. Bar or atm are usually used for pressure of a gas.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:58 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ICE tables
Replies: 4
Views: 8

Re: ICE tables

You use ICE table when the question asks for the equilibrium composition of the reaction system. In other words, the system given in the question is usually not at an equilibrium so the question is basically asking us to find what is the concentration of each molecules when the system is finally at ...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:51 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Ka + Kb
Replies: 6
Views: 17

Re: Ka + Kb

Ka and Kb have an inverse proportional relationship. Ka x Kb = Kw. Kw is a constant therefore when Ka increases Kb must decrease in order to maintain the same constant value for Kw.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:47 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.29 Barr units
Replies: 3
Views: 14

Re: 5I.29 Barr units

You wouldn't need to divide the initial partial pressure with the volume as long as you keep the unit the same for all the other molecules. However, I think if the question gives you a molecule in the unit of bar and another molecule with molarity then I think you would need to convert bar into conc...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:42 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5J.11
Replies: 4
Views: 10

Re: 5J.11

I think the key idea is that bond is being broken during the reaction, and it takes energy (heat) to break bonds. In this case the reaction is endothermic; therefore, increasing the temperature will favor product formation.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:14 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Chemical Activity of a Compound
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: Chemical Activity of a Compound

Chemical activity = activity coefficient x concentration of the compound
Equilibrium constant = Chemical activity of product / chemical activity of reactant
The units basically cancel out therefore equilibrium constant does not have unit.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:02 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Q versus K
Replies: 4
Views: 17

Re: Q versus K

We calculate Q and K the same way (product/reactant). However we use Q when we are unsure whether the chemical reaction is at equilibrium yet. If Q is greater than K then it means that there is still more product that need to be reacted; therefore, it is a reverse reaction going from product to reac...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Jan 09, 2020 1:56 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G. 3
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: 5G. 3

K alone usually works for any phases because it just means equilibrium constant unless the problem tells us to specify either Kc or Kp.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Jan 09, 2020 1:53 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Value of Kc and Kp
Replies: 6
Views: 27

Re: Value of Kc and Kp

Wait I don't think Kc will equal to Kp since they are technically measuring different things. One is concentration while the other is partial pressure. When I looked it up it says that Kc will not always equal to Kp. The only time Kc and Kp are going to be equal is if the number of gas molecules on ...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Jan 09, 2020 1:47 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Calculating K when there is multiple phases
Replies: 4
Views: 29

Re: Calculating K when there is multiple phases

I think in that case we would need to convert the gas to molar concentration using the equation: concentration= P/RT.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:16 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Types of ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 13

Re: Types of ligands

I want to assume that it is talking about the different types of ligand dentates and chelating ligands.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:02 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: K constant and pK value
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Re: K constant and pK value

I don't think we will be asked to find the Ka and Kb because they are for weak acid and weak bases. I don't think we will be asked to find those until 14B. I'm not too sure though. Kw was never in the lecture slides, so I doubt that it will be in the exam
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:59 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate Potential
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: Polydentate Potential

Oxalate (C2O4 2-) can only be a bidentate because when you draw the lewis structure there are only 2 lone pairs in the molecule (one on each farthest oxygen atom). In order to be a tridentate, the ligand must have at least 3 lone pairs.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:50 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate vs Monodentate
Replies: 1
Views: 22

Re: Polydentate vs Monodentate

I think the best way is to draw out the lewis structure of the ligands. If the molecule has 3 lone pairs then it can potentially be tridentate and if the molecule has 2 lone pairs then it can potentially be bidentate and so on. However, a thing to keep in mind is the spacing of these lone pairs. If ...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Dec 04, 2019 7:46 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: KF v KBr
Replies: 1
Views: 17

Re: KF v KBr

KF is a salt that comes from strong base KOH and weak acid KF. When added with water, KF becomes K+ and F- and F- is not stable as an ion because of its strong electronegativity. The F- will attract the H+ from water forming OH-. On the other hand, KBr comes from strong base KOH and strong acid HBr....
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:50 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Coordination Compound with Iron
Replies: 4
Views: 26

Naming Coordination Compound with Iron

In naming coordination compounds, why is Iron, Fe, called ferrate and not ironate if the complex has negative charge? Are there any more unique ones other than Iron?
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:39 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Coordination Compound
Replies: 5
Views: 33

Naming Coordination Compound

When naming a coordination compound, do we put the molecule outside of the coordination sphere before or after the name?
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:25 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 6
Views: 38

Ligands

Are ligands usually bases because they donate electrons to form covalent bond with the central atom?
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:07 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Identifying Acids and Bases
Replies: 8
Views: 32

Identifying Acids and Bases

Is there are way to identify a strong/weak acid or base by just looking at the compound?
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:02 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity and dipole moments
Replies: 8
Views: 43

Re: Polarity and dipole moments

The dipole cancels out when they are exactly opposite of each other and that they are the same atom because different atoms have different dipole force. The only way for a tetrahedral to have no dipole is when all 4 atoms are the same because based on the VSEPR model none of the atoms are points dir...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Tue Nov 19, 2019 11:08 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Polar/nonpolar boiling point
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Re: Polar/nonpolar boiling point

Yes polar molecules will have higher boiling point than nonpolar molecules because polar molecule involves in dipole-dipole interaction, while nonpolar molecules involve in london dispersion. In intermolecular forces, london dispersion is weaker than dipole-dipole interaction; therefore, nonpolar mo...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Tue Nov 19, 2019 11:04 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond angles
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Bond angles

yes 180 would be present in C-C-N bond because the there are 2 electron density around the central atom with no alone pairs. The lone pairs on N would not affect the structure of the C-C-N.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Instantaneous Dipole Moment
Replies: 4
Views: 27

Re: Instantaneous Dipole Moment

Instantaneous dipole moment happens when a polar molecule distorts the electrons in a nonpolar molecule, causing an uneven distribution of electrons which led to a temporary dipole.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:50 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Ionic Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 23

Re: Ionic Bonds

Ionic bond can happen between alkaline earth metals (the column next to the alkali metal) and nonmetals as well because the differences in electromagnetically between these two groups are also large enough to form ionic bonds
by Andrew Liang 1I
Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:46 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: SO2 bond sigma and pi bond
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Re: SO2 bond sigma and pi bond

Since there are 2 double bonds in this molecule we know that there must be 2 sigma and 2 pi bonds because double bond always consists of 1 sigma and 1 pi bond
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:55 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Electron Density
Replies: 10
Views: 57

Re: Electron Density

Yes lone pairs on central atoms are also regions of electron densities because they affect the molecular shape significantly. Lone pairs have strong repulsion that push bonds away.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:50 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 12
Views: 75

Re: Polarity

Another tip that I learned from my TA today was that most of the time when the central atom has lone pairs then the molecule is most likely to be polar.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:45 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Interaction potential energy
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: Interaction potential energy

Interaction potential energy is always negative because it is an attractive force. The equation is [-(alpha 1)(alpha 2)]/r^6
alpha represents the polarizability of the atom or molecule and r represents the distance between the two interactive atoms or molecules.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:29 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: difference between bent and angular
Replies: 4
Views: 27

Re: difference between bent and angular

Bent and angular refer to the same molecular shape. Those words can be used interchangeably.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 14, 2019 2:23 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dashes and Wedges
Replies: 4
Views: 19

Re: Dashes and Wedges

Dashes and wedges are just another way of drawing the structure of the molecule that allows us to visualize its depth and its 3D shape. I think the quiz will most likely still asks us about tetrahedral, trigonal bipyramidal or octahedral shapes
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:10 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond Length differences
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: Bond Length differences

I don't think the bond length difference implies the actual physical length difference. I believe the bond length suggests the strength of the bond. So triple bond does not necessarily means that it is 1/3 the length of the single bond, but rather it suggests that this kind of bond is shorter and st...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:04 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Induced Dipole
Replies: 4
Views: 29

Re: Induced Dipole

Dipole is induced when an charged ion approaches a non-dipole atom/molecule. The charged ion will disturb the electrons of the atom causing one side to be more negative and the opposite side more positive, inducing dipole.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:59 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability of Anions
Replies: 3
Views: 15

Re: Polarizability of Anions

More negatively charged anions are more polarizable especially larger anions at lower periods of the periodic table, such as Iodine. The reason is because there are more electrons in the outer shell that are more likely be attracted to the positive charge of the cation.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent character and ionic character
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: Covalent character and ionic character

Ionic character often involves around an atom donating its electron for the other atom, while covalent character involves 2 or more atoms sharing electrons. You can tell whether a molecule has covalent bond or ionic bond by finding the difference in electronegativity of the atoms. If the difference ...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Nov 07, 2019 12:49 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Boiling Points
Replies: 1
Views: 13

Re: Boiling Points

All halogens exist as diatomic molecules. The inter-molecular attractions between one molecule and its neighbors are called van der Waals dispersion forces. As you move down the group, the molecule gets larger, thus more electrons to move around to form this van der waals attraction. The more attrac...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:48 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Why do all of the bonds have the same length regardless of double/single bonds in a resonance structure?
Replies: 4
Views: 33

Re: Why do all of the bonds have the same length regardless of double/single bonds in a resonance structure?

If in reality the bond length in resonance structure is the same how to people observe that triple bonds are shorter than double bonds and that double bonds are shorter than single bonds?
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:30 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 37

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

A coordinate covalent bond is when an atom provides both electrons to another atom to complete the octet rule.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:16 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Electrostatic Potential Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Electrostatic Potential Energy

Do we need to know how to use this equation: ((q1)(q2))/r to calculate the electrostatic potential energy? I have not seen any of those question in the homework or from discussion sessions.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 31, 2019 12:03 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 37

Re: Ionic and Covalent Bonds

Ionic bond is when an electron is fully transferred to an atom and the two atoms are linked by electrostatic forces. Covalent bond is formed when two atoms share electrons. Ionic bond is stronger than covalent bond.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:58 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration of Tungsten
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: Electron Configuration of Tungsten

# 57 Lanthanum actually belongs to the d-orbital and elements 58-71 belongs to the f-orbital. That's why f-orbital can hold up to 14 electrons and Tungsten have 4 electrons in the d-orbital
by Andrew Liang 1I
Wed Oct 30, 2019 11:34 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: What are the octet exceptions?
Replies: 11
Views: 66

Re: What are the octet exceptions?

P, S , and Cl are the common exceptions to the octet rule. They can hold more than 8 valence electrons because atom in period 3 or higher have d-orbital in valence shell that allows them to hold additional electrons
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:41 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: Electron Configurations

Yes with Dr. Lavelle we do need to write 3d before 4s because 3d actually comes before 4s in electron configuration. 3d is in 3rd principle energy level and 4s is in 4th principle energy level. I'm not too sure about the second part of the question.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:26 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 7
Views: 74

Re: Ionization Energy

The ionization energy to remove the second electron is always higher than removing the first because without 1 extra electron there is less electron repulsion and electrons are more attracted to the positive charge of the nucleus.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:16 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Electron Configurations (p-orbital)
Replies: 5
Views: 29

Re: Electron Configurations (p-orbital)

During the discussion today, our TA said that it is not necessary to write px, py, pz unless it is specifically asked for in the question.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:14 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Threshold Energy
Replies: 4
Views: 34

Re: Threshold Energy

I think the threshold energy can be calculated. I believe the equation is (E of photon) - (Threshold energy) = (Kinetic Energy) so if we rearrange the equation a little bit it will be: (Threshold energy)=(E of photon) - (Kinetic Energy). However, if the question is asking for the kinetic energy or t...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:06 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: 2A.21 Ground-state Electron Configuration
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: 2A.21 Ground-state Electron Configuration

The standard electron configuration for a neutral Ag atom is [Kr] 4d^10 5s^1, not 4d^9 5s^2, because the outermost electron moves to the 4d orbital, filling it up and making the atom more stable. Therefore, the Ag cation loses its outermost electron, which is in the 5s energy level, making the elect...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 17, 2019 8:39 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: the m in the de broglie equation
Replies: 5
Views: 34

Re: the m in the de broglie equation

The "m" in De Broglie's equation refers to the mass of the object with momentum, P, and has wavelike properties with wavelength. However if the mass is large then the object most likely does not have detectable wave-light property and acts more like a particle.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:30 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Wave Properties vs. Particle Properties
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: Wave Properties vs. Particle Properties

When the light intensity is increase, the only thing that is changing is the number of photons. In that case, each photon still does not have enough energy to knockout an electron. In EM waves, intensity does not increase the energy of the photon. Frequency is the one that affects the energy of the ...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:26 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Atomic Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Atomic Orbitals

I am quite confused with the idea of principle, angular, and magnetic quantum numbers (n,l, and ml). How do you determine the the state of the electron with those quantum numbers? During lecture I saw a chart in the slide that can help us determine the state of the electron, but are we suppose to kn...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 17, 2019 7:18 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Theoretical vs. Actual Yield
Replies: 38
Views: 432

Re: Theoretical vs. Actual Yield

A lot of reactions or system cannot be 100% efficient because there are always something that is lost to the environment, uncontrollable variables that can alter the result, side reaction, and impurities. Those are just some of the reasons why actually yield is almost always less than the theoretica...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 17, 2019 4:43 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1A7b textbook solution typo?
Replies: 5
Views: 52

Re: 1A7b textbook solution typo?

On my solution manual, it says 150 pm. You are right and maybe it is a typo in the textbook.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:35 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of light
Replies: 9
Views: 53

Re: Speed of light

In high school I learned something about the refraction index of a medium. The equation is n = c/v. n is the index, c is the speed of light constant, and v is the velocity of light in the medium. To answer your question, i think the question will have to do something with the index.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:25 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Intensity of Light
Replies: 7
Views: 51

Re: Photoelectric Effect Intensity of Light

When the experiment changed the intensity of the light on the metal, it is only changing the amount of photons in the light. Lower intensity means less photons and thus dimmer light. Electromagnetic wave does not behave the same as sound wave or ocean wave. When we increase the intensity of an EM wa...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 9:12 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Finding Limiting Reactant
Replies: 3
Views: 65

Re: Finding Limiting Reactant

Limiting Reactant is the substance that is completely used up in a chemical reaction. Limiting reactant determines how much product is produced in a chemical reaction. Identifying Limiting Reactant: 1. Identify reactant and products 2. write a balanced equation for the reaction 3. Calculate molar ma...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:45 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Angstrom
Replies: 16
Views: 194

Re: Angstrom

An angstrom is a unit of length usually used to measure the bond length of atoms. It has the symbol of Å. 1Å = 1x10^-10 m
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:42 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: temperature
Replies: 4
Views: 66

Re: temperature

K = C +273.15 -----> C = K - 273.15
F =(1.8)(C)+32
Kelvin to Fahrenheit = F = (1.8)(K - 273.15) + 32
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 10, 2019 6:55 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Clarification on Frequency
Replies: 8
Views: 86

Re: Clarification on Frequency

We cannot really change the frequency of a wave unless we completely change the type of the electromagnetic wave. Frequency of an electromagnetic wave normally remains the same because each electromagnetic wave has its own unique driven oscillation. When we increase the intensity of the light, we ar...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:06 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Study Tips
Replies: 58
Views: 709

Re: Study Tips

You can check out the class website and you'll see there are a lot of discussion sections, peer learning sessions, exam review sessions, and Step-Up Sessions you can attend. Online learning modules are also a great help!
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:59 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Determining Sig Fig's
Replies: 5
Views: 60

Re: Determining Sig Fig's

To determine how many sig fig you should write in an answer really depends on the problems. So the general rule is that the number of sig fig of your answer should have the same number of the lowest sig fig number in the problem. Ex: 2.1 x 3.54 = 7.434 but you will need to round the answer to 7.4 be...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:57 am
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Products of combustion reactions
Replies: 7
Views: 67

Re: Products of combustion reactions

Yes! In complete combustion CO2 and H2O are usually the byproduct of combustion unless the problem gives you other byproduct. However i believe in incomplete combustion, CO is produced instead of CO2.
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:50 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Textbook Question E15
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Textbook Question E15

The problem has given us that a mystery metal hydroxide M(OH)2 is 74.10 g.mol-1 1. We need to find out what the metal is -----> (74.10 g.mol-1) - (34.02 g.mol-1 of (OH)2) = 40.08 g.mol-1 2. Determine the metal -----> From the periodic table we can see that Calcium has the molar mass of 40.08 g there...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:28 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant Figures
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Significant Figures

To determine how many sig fig you should write in an answer really depends on the problems. So the general rule is that the number of sig fig of your answer should have the same number of the lowest sig fig number in the problem. Ex: 2.1 x 3.54 = 7.434 but you will need to round the answer to 7.4 be...
by Andrew Liang 1I
Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:14 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: HW E.23
Replies: 3
Views: 18

Re: HW E.23

Here is my work process for E23

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