Search found 90 matches

by 005321227
Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:31 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Decreasing pressure
Replies: 6
Views: 39

Re: Decreasing pressure

a decrease in pressure means an increase in volume.
by 005321227
Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:30 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: midterm question// Concentration ratio [ENDORSED]
Replies: 8
Views: 107

Re: midterm question// Concentration ratio [ENDORSED]

was the equation given on the equation sheet on the midterm? I dont recall it being given
by 005321227
Wed Feb 19, 2020 1:29 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: pv=nrt
Replies: 19
Views: 65

Re: pv=nrt

at STP, you simply input the standard temperature and pressure into the equation: 1 atm and 273 degrees kelvin. Then you may proceed with the problem as normal
by 005321227
Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:00 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Homework 8.27
Replies: 5
Views: 1175

Re: Homework 8.27

Using pv=nrt, I determined that n=0.003mol. However, when I put that into the equation w=-nRTln(v2/v1), I get -3.18J, which is not possible since an isothermal reversible expansion always does more work than an irreversible one. Can anyone determine what I did wrong? I'm having trouble figuring it o...
by 005321227
Tue Feb 11, 2020 3:47 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Homework 8.27
Replies: 5
Views: 1175

Re: Homework 8.27

I'm a bit confused as to where the given temperature comes in
by 005321227
Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:02 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: problem 4A9
Replies: 2
Views: 18

problem 4A9

A piece of copper of mass 20.0 g at 100.0 8C is placed in a vessel of negligible heat capacity but containing 50.7 g of water at 22.0 8C. Calculate the final temperature of the water. Assume that no energy is lost to the surroundings. Im a bit confused on how to proceed with this problem. I used q=M...
by 005321227
Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:00 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Partial Pressure
Replies: 7
Views: 46

Re: Partial Pressure

partial pressure is specifically the pressure of a specific gas in a mixture or reaction, whereas pressure is the pressure of the entire reaction.
by 005321227
Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:55 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: irreversible equations
Replies: 2
Views: 15

Re: irreversible equations

no, not for calculating work.
by 005321227
Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:55 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: HW 4c.3
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: HW 4c.3

you need to plug the equation into PV=nRT in order to proceed with this problem since it is stated in the problem that it is an ideal gas. Thus, for constant pressure you solve for the P and for constant volume you solve for the V.
by 005321227
Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:53 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: including phase changes
Replies: 2
Views: 16

Re: including phase changes

usually the phase change will be given in the question and you just apply it as needed
by 005321227
Thu Feb 06, 2020 6:51 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Calculating required heat
Replies: 4
Views: 2874

Re: Calculating required heat

why do we need to add the specific heat capacities? and how are we supposed to assume this is a composite system? im working on this question right now and im also wondering if we add the specific heat capacities of water and copper in one equation or do two separate equations?
by 005321227
Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:10 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Heat Supplied to a system
Replies: 6
Views: 39

Heat Supplied to a system

(a) Calculate the heat that must be supplied to a copper kettle of mass 400.0 g containing 300.0 g of water to raise its tem- perature from 20.0 8C to the boiling point of water, 100.0 8C. (b) What percentage of the heat is used to raise the temperature of the water? I am slightly confused on how to...
by 005321227
Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:08 am
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: homework question 4A.3
Replies: 6
Views: 44

Re: homework question 4A.3

how do you go about the conversions for this problem? the answer is given using L times atm.
by 005321227
Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:37 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Enthalpy

Jasmine Fendi 1D wrote:Enthalpy is just the measure of heat! Temperature and enthalpy are related but are different, as seen in heat curves. The x-axis is heat supplied and the y-axis is temperature

How are heat and enthalpy different?
by 005321227
Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:36 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Adding and subtracting properties
Replies: 6
Views: 26

Adding and subtracting properties

Can someone please explain why we do final minus initial when doing state properties?
by 005321227
Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:34 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: heating curves
Replies: 4
Views: 732

Re: heating curves

No. The heating curve introduced in lecture is specific to only water
by 005321227
Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:28 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heating curve
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Heating curve

In lecture, Professor Lavelle asked why steam causes severe burns, and proceeded to show the heat curve. Can someone explain the heating curve and what it means?
by 005321227
Wed Jan 22, 2020 10:05 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: exothermic reactions
Replies: 19
Views: 70

Re: exothermic reactions

yes, cooling will favor the products!
by 005321227
Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:16 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kp given instead of Kc
Replies: 8
Views: 42

Kp given instead of Kc

If Kp is given rather than Kc in a problem but the product is given in moles or grams rather than bars, how do you proceed with the problem? how can you convert to pressure?
by 005321227
Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:29 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I29
Replies: 2
Views: 15

5I29

At 25 8C, K 5 3.2 3 10234 for the reaction 2 HCl(g) ∆ H2(g) 1 Cl2(g). If a reaction vessel of volume 1.0 L is filled with HCl at 0.22 bar, what are the equilibrium partial pressures of HCl, H2, and Cl2? Do we need to set up an ice box with the partial pressure of HCl although it is given in partial ...
by 005321227
Mon Jan 13, 2020 10:35 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: HW 5I23
Replies: 1
Views: 42

HW 5I23

A reaction mixture consisting of 2.00 mol CO and 3.00 mol H2 is placed in a reaction vessel of volume 10.0 L and heated to 1200. K. At equilibrium, 0.478 mol CH4 was present in the system. Determine the value of Kc for the reaction CO(g) 1 3 H2(g) ∆ CH4(g) 1 H2O(g) at 1200. K. Can someone explain ho...
by 005321227
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: units of K
Replies: 10
Views: 32

Re: units of K

K does not have units. because it is a ratio of products to reactants, and is a constant in the reaction. Also, if you worked out the math in an equilibrium problem K = [P]/[R], and so the molarities cancel out.
by 005321227
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:25 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Solids and Liquids
Replies: 7
Views: 35

Re: Solids and Liquids

The reason solids are not used in equilibrium reactions is because their concentrations stay constant throughout the reaction
by 005321227
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:23 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5G3
Replies: 8
Views: 31

Re: 5G3

Yes, gases are included in the gas phase. H20 in the liquid phase is not used because they do not affect the reactant amount at equilibrium.
by 005321227
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:21 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: kc vs kp
Replies: 19
Views: 586

Re: kc vs kp

Kp and Kc are both calculated in the same way. However, Kc is denoted when a problem is given using molar concentrations, and Kp is denoted when a problem is given using pressures of a gas
by 005321227
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:20 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: K and Q
Replies: 13
Views: 51

Re: K and Q

Q can be used whether or not the reaction is at equilibrium, and is used to determine whether or not a reaction is in equilibrium. K can only be used when a reaction is in equilibrium. Both are calculated in the same way.
by 005321227
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:18 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: 5G.9 -- Partial Pressures?
Replies: 2
Views: 27

Re: 5G.9 -- Partial Pressures?

Because more moles of O3 are placed in a container of the same volume in the second experiment, the partial pressure of O2 will be higher. This is because the Kp must be the same, so the pressure of O2 of the second experiment must be higher to maintain the same Product to reactant ratio as the firs...
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:50 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: how to figure out?
Replies: 12
Views: 81

Re: how to figure out?

the conjugate base is the product you have after your acid gives off a proton; the conjugate acid is what product you have after your base accepts a proton.
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:48 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Sig Figs for logarithmic funcitons
Replies: 6
Views: 62

Re: Sig Figs for logarithmic funcitons

count the sig figs AFTER your decimal :)
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:46 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong Acids
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: Strong Acids

are these memorized or should we be able to explain these?
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:44 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Final
Replies: 6
Views: 67

Re: Final

The hydrogen bonding od DNA Base pairs, heme as a coordination compound, cisplatin for chemotherapy, vitamins as acceptors of dangerous radicals, the role of carbon dioxide in blood ph These are the examples i can think of can you elaborate on the vitamins? So as you already know, radicals contain ...
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:43 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Final
Replies: 6
Views: 67

Re: Final

the hydrogen bonding of base pairs, edta, hemoglobin and myoglobin, cisplatin v translation as an effective chemotherapy drug.
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:40 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Polydentate

They are the same things, however hexadentate is a more specific and accurate response especially for edta since we focused on it so much!
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:38 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: chemotherapy drugs
Replies: 4
Views: 27

Re: chemotherapy drugs

Its not chemotherapy's structure, it's the structure of the chemotherapy drug known as cisplatin. Cisplatin has two chlorines on the same side that attach to the guanine base pairs of a DNA molecule, allowing for a stronger bond to block DNA polymerase from replicating a cancerous DNA strand. Transp...
by 005321227
Sat Dec 07, 2019 9:31 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: chelating ligands [ENDORSED]
Replies: 21
Views: 1919

Re: chelating ligands [ENDORSED]

sigma bonds are able to rotate already!
by 005321227
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: How can you tell
Replies: 11
Views: 103

Re: How can you tell

make sure that the anion has more than one hydrogen!
by 005321227
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:06 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: atomic spectra
Replies: 1
Views: 27

Re: atomic spectra

it would make the emission of energy negative, as it is emitting more than it already has when a photon is emitted.
by 005321227
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:04 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: transition of orbitals
Replies: 2
Views: 34

transition of orbitals

Which of the following increase when the electron in a hydrogen atom undergoes a transition from the 1s-orbital to a 2p-orbital? (a) Energy of the electron. (b) Value of n. (c) Value of l. (d) Radius of the atom. Can someone explain part d of this problem? what does the radius of the atom have to do...
by 005321227
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:42 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis vs. Bronsted
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Lewis vs. Bronsted

A molecule that is a Lewis acid can also be considered a Bronsted acid (and vice versa) since their definitions do line up. In order for a molecule to accept an electron pair (be a Bronsted acid), it donates a proton (is a Lewis acid). Typically you can use both definitions to define an acid unless...
by 005321227
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:38 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted v Lewis acids and bases
Replies: 1
Views: 16

Bronsted v Lewis acids and bases

Can someone explain the difference between bronsted and Lewis acids and bases, and also conjugate? I dont understand the differences between them
by 005321227
Tue Dec 03, 2019 11:37 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted v Lewis acids and bases
Replies: 1
Views: 17

Bronsted v Lewis acids and bases

Can someone explain the difference between bronsted and Lewis acids and bases, and also conjugate? I dont understand the differences between them
by 005321227
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: lewis symbols
Replies: 1
Views: 54

lewis symbols

On the basis of the expected charges of the monatomic ions, draw the formula unit of each of the following compounds using Lewis symbols: (a) thallium(III) chloride; (b) aluminum sulfide; (c) barium oxide.
by 005321227
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 17
Views: 198

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Yes, with a nitrogen, oxygen, or fluorine
by 005321227
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:37 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: shapes
Replies: 1
Views: 72

shapes

The following species have the same number of electrons: 1 21 Cd, In , and Sn . (a) Write the electron configurations for each species. Explain any differences. (b) How many unpaired elec- trons, if any, are present in each species? (c) What neutral atom, if 31 any, has the same electron configurati...
by 005321227
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:35 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Determining Polarity
Replies: 10
Views: 69

Re: Determining Polarity

memorization in this situation will help - the chart in the textbook provides the shapes along with their polarities.
by 005321227
Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: acid v. base?
Replies: 16
Views: 73

Re: acid v. base?

Lewis bases will typically contain the lone pair to donate to the Lewis acid
by 005321227
Fri Nov 22, 2019 7:30 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: 2D.3
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: 2D.3

You can determine ionic bonds by their electronegativity differences: if the difference is over 2, it is considered ionic.
by 005321227
Fri Nov 22, 2019 7:29 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: boiling point
Replies: 6
Views: 82

Re: boiling point

The number of lone pairs (more electrons) increases polarizability thus a higher melting point.
by 005321227
Fri Nov 22, 2019 7:28 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2F.1
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Re: 2F.1

The orientation of the orbitals will be facing outwards, so 120 degrees
by 005321227
Fri Nov 22, 2019 7:27 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polar or Nonpolar
Replies: 5
Views: 70

Re: Polar or Nonpolar

Always look at the symmetry of a molecule first. If a molecule is symmetrical, it is non polar. If not, find the Mose electronegative atom and that is the slightly negative end of a polar molecule
by 005321227
Fri Nov 22, 2019 7:23 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: polarizability
Replies: 9
Views: 67

Re: polarizability

A higher polarizability indicates a higher melting point since it has higher intermolecular forces
by 005321227
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:24 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: T shape
Replies: 7
Views: 48

T shape

Can someone explain T shape and give an example of a molecule with the T shape?
by 005321227
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:23 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: bond angles
Replies: 10
Views: 65

Re: bond angles

Simply look at the. lone pairs and bonds in the molecule top determine your answer
by 005321227
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:23 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Octahedral
Replies: 5
Views: 29

Re: Octahedral

The shape of the orbitals is octahedral. One orbital contains a lone pair of electrons so the remaining five atoms connected to the central atom gives the molecule a square pyramidal shape
by 005321227
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:22 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: T-shaped
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: T-shaped

A t shaped has three bonds and two lone pairs, as discussed in section 2E of the textbook.
by 005321227
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:21 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: incomplete octet
Replies: 6
Views: 59

Re: incomplete octet

Incomplete octets can occur when elements do not have enough electrons to complete an octet around each element, even with double or triple bonds.
by 005321227
Fri Nov 15, 2019 12:21 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: incomplete octet
Replies: 6
Views: 59

Re: incomplete octet

Incomplete octets can occur when elements do not have enough electrons to complete an octet around each element, even with double or triple bonds.
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:19 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: H Bonding
Replies: 4
Views: 29

Re: H Bonding

H bonding is not as strong because it is less of a bond and more of an attraction between the slightly negative and slightly positive sides of molecules.
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:09 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: 14BL
Replies: 5
Views: 60

Re: 14BL

Its a lot of commitment, with the studying from 14B and the hours spent in lab. Its suggested you take them separate quarters, or even better, take the lab during summer if you can!
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:08 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 4
Views: 22

Re: Polarizability

Larger atoms means more electrons meaning more shielding can occur
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet Rule exceptions
Replies: 14
Views: 115

Re: Octet Rule exceptions

The first four elements will never have an octet. P,Cl, and S will typically break the octet
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:06 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: octet v. expanded octet
Replies: 5
Views: 35

Re: octet v. expanded octet

Its always one or the other. Elements like P,CL, and S typically break the octet rule
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:05 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Antioxidants
Replies: 9
Views: 88

Re: Antioxidants

Antioxidants give an e- to a radical to stabilize it. Foods like dark berries contain a lot of these and are critical in a balanced diet to stabilize free radicals in the body.
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:04 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: How to find the longest wavelength?
Replies: 6
Views: 54

Re: How to find the longest wavelength?

find the wavelength of light equal to the work function
by 005321227
Sun Nov 10, 2019 11:03 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Hydrogen Bond Strength
Replies: 8
Views: 55

Re: Hydrogen Bond Strength

Hydrogen bonds are the weakest amongst the bonds. Ionic is next strongest, and covalent bonds are the strongest bonds
by 005321227
Tue Nov 05, 2019 11:19 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: +/- speed
Replies: 3
Views: 47

+/- speed

A bowling ball of mass 8.00 kg is rolled down a bowling alley lane at 5.00+/- 5.00m/s. What is the minimum uncertainty of its position?

When given a +/- in speed, how do we proceed with the problem?
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:25 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance Structures
Replies: 5
Views: 37

Re: Resonance Structures

The most stable structure is that with the lowest formal charge. So while multiple structures may be drawn, there is typically one with the lowest formal charge that is accurate.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:23 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 28
Views: 186

Re: Midterm

The midterm covers everything from fundamentals to 2D in the homework assignments and readings.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:22 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet Rule Exceptions
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: Octet Rule Exceptions

The octet rule mainly only applies to atoms with less electrons. As the atomic number increases, the atom is more capable of having more than an octet.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:20 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: 2D.1
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: 2D.1

Electronegativity decreases down a group and across a period, so just look at the positions of the elements on the periodic table.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:19 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Exceptions to the Octet
Replies: 5
Views: 38

Exceptions to the Octet

How does P violate the octet rule? does it have a valence shell of 10?
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:18 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: D orbital
Replies: 5
Views: 32

Re: D orbital

Since each orbital holds two electrons, the d-orbital has 5, allowing for ten total electrons.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 31, 2019 10:16 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Heisenberg
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Re: Heisenberg

If the uncertainty was too large, the equation would essentially be useless
by 005321227
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:18 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity
Replies: 6
Views: 271

Re: Electronegativity

since oxygen has a smaller radius, its electronegativity is higher!
by 005321227
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:15 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionizatiom Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 15

Ionizatiom Energy

Why does ionization energy decrease as shells fill up?
by 005321227
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:14 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: 4s before 3d
Replies: 4
Views: 41

4s before 3d

I'm still confused on why the 4s group comes before the 3d group from Dr. Lavelle's lecture, can someone explain why and for what situations this applies?
by 005321227
Sun Oct 27, 2019 11:12 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ground State
Replies: 11
Views: 70

Ground State

What exactly does ground state electron configuration mean? What is it asking me to find?
by 005321227
Sun Oct 20, 2019 5:22 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 163

Re: Orbitals

i believe this is how you do it: a) 103 because ml can be any value between [-l, l] so there are 51*2+1 possible orbitals bc) 1 because they give you a ml value so there's only one possible orbital d) if n=57 then there are 57 possible l values and for each of them they'd have l*2+1 orbitals (or ju...
by 005321227
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:38 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: When energy is equal to work function
Replies: 9
Views: 91

Re: When energy is equal to work function

when the energy of the photon of the energy required to eject the electron from the metal, the electron will be ejected from the metal!
by 005321227
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:37 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: HW 1B.5
Replies: 8
Views: 81

Re: HW 1B.5

you must multiply by 10^3 to convert to the correct units
by 005321227
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:35 am
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 17
Views: 111

Re: De Broglie's Equation

since wavelength=h/mv, the object must have a mass. While Light has a velocity, it does not have a mass to calculate
by 005321227
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:33 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 3
Views: 163

Orbitals

Can anyone help with this problem?

How many orbitals can have the following quantum numbersinanatom:(a)n53,l51;(b)n55,l53,ml 521; (c)n52,l51,ml 50;(d)n57?
by 005321227
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:30 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Spectrum of light
Replies: 6
Views: 33

Re: Spectrum of light

Gamma Ray, X ray, Ultraviolet, Visible spectrum, Infared, Microwave, Radio
by 005321227
Fri Oct 18, 2019 11:29 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Spectrum of light
Replies: 6
Views: 33

Re: Spectrum of light

Gamma Ray, X ray, Ultraviolet, Visible spectrum, Infared, Microwave, Radio
by 005321227
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:12 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: 100 gram Method?
Replies: 9
Views: 94

Re: 100 gram Method?

The 100-gram trick essentially simplifies calculations when given percent compositions of elements in a molecule. What you do, is convert the mass percentages to grams (as if out of 100) and divide by the molar masses in order to find the moles of each element and be able to determine your ratios fr...
by 005321227
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:06 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Clarification
Replies: 4
Views: 78

Re: Clarification

Yes, since the limiting reactant is the product that is not in excess, it is the product that will be completely used up and therefore determines the maximum (theoretical) yield that can be produced.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:04 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: which unit to use
Replies: 9
Views: 139

Re: which unit to use

Always stay consistent with the units given to you in the problem, but always remember that you may have to convert some units in order to fit into the problem (such as converting milliliters to liters to find molarity.) However if an answer seems too small or too large for a given unit, feel free t...
by 005321227
Thu Oct 03, 2019 6:59 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: What does μm mean?
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: What does μm mean?

the represents the prefix micro-, thus the term meaning micrometer, which is meters
by 005321227
Thu Oct 03, 2019 6:56 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Fig Rules
Replies: 7
Views: 60

Re: Sig Fig Rules

With sig figs, use the exact values you calculate until you reach your final answer. Then, round to the same number of sig figs as the values given in the problem. If the value is below five, round down. If the value is five or above, round up to the net nearest integer.
by 005321227
Thu Oct 03, 2019 6:55 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Fig Rules
Replies: 7
Views: 60

Re: Sig Fig Rules

With sig figs, use the exact values you calculate until you reach your final answer. Then, round to the same number of sig figs as the values given in the problem. If the value is below five, round down. If the value is five or above, round up to the net nearest integer.

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