Search found 99 matches

by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 9:30 pm
Forum: *Free Energy of Activation vs Activation Energy
Topic: Temperature vs. activation energy
Replies: 5
Views: 334

Re: Temperature vs. activation energy

I do believe increasing T also increases k reaction constant.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 9:27 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Printing for Final
Replies: 9
Views: 235

Re: Printing for Final

I don't think we need to print anything out, it should all be online. Having your notes and scrap paper for work would be helpful though!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 9:12 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Relationship between work, cell potential, and delta G
Replies: 6
Views: 138

Re: Relationship between work, cell potential, and delta G

When delta G is negative, there is energy free to do work. Cell potential wants to go down. IF cell potential goes down there is a release of energy free to do work. I don’t think this is a correct. In the equation delta G= -nFEcell, if cell potential is higher, and more positive, then Gibbs free e...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:54 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: are there standard rates of formation?
Replies: 4
Views: 80

Re: are there standard rates of formation?

They should give you this information in the question or somewhere on the test. It would definitely be tedious if we had to look these up by ourselves.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:50 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Mnemonic for Oxidation and Reduction
Replies: 7
Views: 133

Re: Mnemonic for Oxidation and Reduction

Thanks! For oxidation reduction I also usually use Leo the lion goes ger. LEO --> lose electrons Oxidation, GER--- gain electrons reduction.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:41 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: final exam - question
Replies: 6
Views: 223

Re: final exam - question

At the same time, he said the test should be relatively straightforward and open notes. So, maybe we will be okay? Either way, good luck everybody!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:40 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Final Exam Time
Replies: 13
Views: 259

Re: Final Exam Time

It is timed, from 11:15am and ends 2:45pm, but we have 3 and a half hours. Hopefully that will be enough. Good Luck!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:39 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Reaction order
Replies: 4
Views: 66

Re: Reaction order

Yea, it can be used for any reaction order!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:35 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Test 2 Return
Replies: 20
Views: 340

Re: Test 2 Return

Not sure if this helps but here is the link to some of the answer keys for test 2.

viewtopic.php?f=160&t=62122&p=237630&hilit=test+2&sid=398e06555d588269350912837d954689#p237630
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:33 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Video help
Replies: 3
Views: 98

Re: Video help

Okay, thank you I will definitely check them out.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:33 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Qc vs Kc
Replies: 8
Views: 435

Re: Qc vs Kc

If they are equal then the reaction is at equilibrium. If Q>K then the forward reaction or products are favored. The opposite is true for Q<K the reactants are favored.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:30 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Take Home Final
Replies: 16
Views: 272

Re: Take Home Final

It seems like this is just an online test with no scanning, so It seems like it would be hard to show your work and have that be graded. But maybe you will have to put in answers for intermediate steps and that could be counted as work? Im not sure, but Lavelle said the test would be straightforward...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:28 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: Units
Replies: 9
Views: 116

Re: Units

This helped me, hope it helps you too. https://users.stlcc.edu/gkrishnan/rateunits.htm
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:27 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Video help
Replies: 3
Views: 98

Video help

Hey does anyone have any good online videos that go over Rates and Rate laws? Thank you! and good luck tomorrow everyone.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:19 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Enthalpy Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Enthalpy Equation

The derivation is:
deltaU = w + q
w= deltaH
q=-P*deltaV
so,
deltaU=deltaH-P*deltaV
which you can rearrange as:
H=U+PV
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:17 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: R and Nernst equation
Replies: 2
Views: 94

Re: R and Nernst equation

If you write out the units for all the constants in the equation you can see how they cancel out. I believe the final units should simplify out to V. I think you always use 8.314 for R because the J cancels out.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:11 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: Catalysts
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: Catalysts

I believe so, also in a reaction I think it can sometimes be represented on the arrow. It isn't necessarily the opposite of a intermediate, an intermediate is created and consumed. The catalyst is just a substance or molecule that a reaction takes place on. It isn't used up in the reaction.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:03 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Equation Sheet
Replies: 6
Views: 136

Re: Equation Sheet

I could be wrong but I remember it being on the equation sheet for test 2? but otherwise it isn't on the current online equation sheet. Although the test is open notes so just make a note of it.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 8:01 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: YouTube videos for Redox Reactions
Replies: 4
Views: 109

Re: YouTube videos for Redox Reactions

Oh wow thank you! This video was pretty helpful for me
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:36 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: bars
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: bars

I think you can convert to atm. Cause equilibrium can also be calculated through pressure. Someone correct me if I am wrong
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:34 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: average rate
Replies: 4
Views: 78

Re: average rate

You are correct, the negative is used to show that the reactants are being used up.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:33 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: q=qP
Replies: 3
Views: 81

Re: q=qP

Just like qV Is heat at a constant volume, qP is heat at a constant pressure. Good luck!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:31 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Is pH normally taken at equilibrium concentrations?
Replies: 3
Views: 158

Re: Is pH normally taken at equilibrium concentrations?

Usually it should tell you if it isn't taken at equilibrium. This really isn't a big problem, just make sure you put the H+ concentration in the correct place in the ice tables.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:28 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Conjugate Seesaw
Replies: 5
Views: 106

Re: Conjugate Seesaw

Conjugate seesaw has to do with conjugate acids and bases. A weak acid will have a strong conjugate base. A strong acid will have a weak conjugate base. You can see how this is metaphorically related to the idea of a seesaw.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:27 pm
Forum: Reaction Mechanisms, Reaction Profiles
Topic: intermediates
Replies: 8
Views: 94

Re: intermediates

Intermediates are what they sound like. They are molecules that are produced in one reaction and consumed by a second reaction. They occur, because most reactions don't always happen in a single step. Intermediates just represent products in a first reaction and reactants in a second. You can tell, ...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:23 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Van't Hoff Equation
Replies: 6
Views: 101

Re: Van't Hoff Equation

You shouldn't really need to manipulate the equation too much. It is used to solve for K values for a certain recreation at different temperatures. So If you know the K at a certain temperature, you can use the equation to solve for K at another temperature.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:15 pm
Forum: Interesting Applications: Rechargeable Batteries (Cell Phones, Notebooks, Cars), Fuel Cells (Space Shuttle), Photovoltaic Cells (Solar Panels), Electrolysis, Rust
Topic: Electrolysis
Replies: 6
Views: 93

Re: Electrolysis

I would know it since it was on the outline. It is a fairly simple concept, watch some videos on it.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:12 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: ENDGAME Q.10
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Re: ENDGAME Q.10

You don't have to flip the values in the table. You can leave them and just plug them straight into the Cathode-Anode Equation.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 7:04 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Platinum
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: Platinum

Platinum is also very oxidation stable in comparison to most metals.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:59 pm
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: FInal
Replies: 6
Views: 205

Re: FInal

It would obviously be more helpful for the final to know things more in-depth, but for the most part what Lavelle has said during lecture should be sufficient in my opinion. If you have extra time, I would go ahead and look over the textbook though. Lavelle wouldn't put anything in outside of our ca...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:54 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: balancing h and o
Replies: 7
Views: 132

Re: balancing h and o

I usually balance the Hydrogens based off Oxygens, so I guess you could say balance O2 first then H+
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:53 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: oh
Replies: 11
Views: 199

Re: oh

Generally no, H2O is probably best to be used. OH can create issues with PH if it is an acidic or basic reaction
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:48 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: intensive vs extensive
Replies: 7
Views: 144

Re: intensive vs extensive

Extensive represents things that are dependent on amount. While intensive represents things that aren't dependent on amount, like density. It is important to consider these when using constants and equations during your calculations.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:45 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: w
Replies: 1
Views: 65

Re: w

I think this is because we want to find one mole's worth, which is avagodros number in terms of atoms or molecules.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:41 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: ln
Replies: 9
Views: 131

Re: ln

it is e to the power, to get rid of Ln. Try some examples on your calculator.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:40 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: negative sign
Replies: 6
Views: 113

Re: negative sign

I believe it has to do with the relationship between E and delta G. When E is positive, delta G should be negative meaning it is spontaneous.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:35 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: self-test explanation
Replies: 1
Views: 62

Re: self-test explanation

I think it is because delta S is negative. So in the equation DeltaG=DeltaH-TDeltaS, delta S being negative would make delta G positive, increasing T would just make it more positive, because delta G is positive when it is non-spontaneous. (-T*-deltaS is going to equal a positive number)
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:30 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Pt in Cell Diagram
Replies: 10
Views: 169

Re: Pt in Cell Diagram

There has to be a solid metal present in a cell diagram, Pt just happens to be the most common that is used if one isn't presented in the question.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:28 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Endothermic vs Exothermic
Replies: 2
Views: 95

Re: Endothermic vs Exothermic

Im not exactly sure if this is what you are asking but I hope this answer helps. A reaction is exothermic if Kc decreases with an increase in temperature, as the reaction shifts left, or Kc increases with a decrease in temperature, as the reaction shifts right. This is because in an exothermic react...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:20 pm
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Nernst Equation
Replies: 6
Views: 108

Re: Nernst Equation

No it is not necessary. Just make sure you plug in the correct values for R, F, and T. For R you should usually be using the 8.314J/K*mol.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 6:01 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: intermediate v. catalyst
Replies: 6
Views: 49

Re: intermediate v. catalyst

A catalyst is not used up in the reactions. An intermediate is created and later consumed.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Mar 14, 2020 5:58 pm
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: Entropy and complexity
Replies: 2
Views: 79

Re: Entropy and complexity

Larger molecules have more entropy, due to them containing more bonds and therefore more ways of orientation. I believe that standard entropy increases with increasing mass
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Feb 27, 2020 9:11 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: When to apply Pt into cell diagrams
Replies: 9
Views: 90

Re: When to apply Pt into cell diagrams

Pt is included if their is not a metallic solid in the cell diagram. Hg(l) mercury can also be included but I believe 99% of the time it is a metal solid that is included.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Feb 27, 2020 9:11 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: When to apply Pt into cell diagrams
Replies: 9
Views: 90

Re: When to apply Pt into cell diagrams

Pt is included if their is not a metallic solid in the cell diagram. Hg(l) mercury can also be included but I believe 99% of the time it is a metal solid that is included.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:21 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: endothermic
Replies: 8
Views: 48

Re: endothermic

Increasing temperature flows away from "heat", so in an endothermic reaction it flows to the products and increases the equilibrium constant
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Jan 26, 2020 10:20 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: R Constant
Replies: 26
Views: 320

Re: R Constant

The R constant is dependent on the units of pressure you are given. Looking up a table is helpful and just pay attention to the units you are given in the question. You don't need to memorize this, just know which values correspond to each unit of pressure.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Dec 07, 2019 6:37 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: (ox) and (en)
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: (os) and (en)

(en) refers to ethylenediamine
here's its formula: NH2CH2CH2NH2
it is a chelating ligand (bidentate)

Im not sure what (os) but if you meant (ox) then ox is oxalate: C2O4 with a 2- charge, this is also bindendate chelating
Os could also mean Osmium? Where exactly did you see (os)
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Dec 07, 2019 6:27 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: acid rain
Replies: 4
Views: 152

Re: acid rain

You should know the equation and the idea behind acid rain. Carbon dioxide reacts with water in The atmosphere to form carbonic acid, which is released in acid rain H2O + CO2 --> H2CO3 it may also be helpful to know that H2CO3 can dissociate and give off one of the protons H2CO3 --> HCO3- + H+
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Dec 07, 2019 6:20 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands and Coordination Numbers
Replies: 4
Views: 75

Re: Chelating Ligands and Coordination Numbers

Yeah it would be six. I think I was a bit confused earlier when I was typing my answer. Sorry!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sat Dec 07, 2019 6:19 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: determining dentate
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: determining dentate

It is just how many times a ligand attaches to the metal in the center.

Example: If it attaches four times its tetradentate
by Indy Bui 1l
Fri Dec 06, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: determining conj. acids& bases
Replies: 2
Views: 121

Re: determining conj. acids& bases

The conjugate base of an acid is the form the acid takes after giving up a proton (H). Additionally, a conjugate acid of a base is the form a base takes after gaining a proton (H). for example: CH3CO2H is an Acid and CH3CO2- is its conjugate base, because it lost a proton H2O becoming H3O+ (hydroniu...
by Indy Bui 1l
Fri Dec 06, 2019 11:00 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: EDTA
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: EDTA

It is Hexadentate.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:11 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Content of the final
Replies: 10
Views: 464

Re: Content of the final

Yea I don't believe we need to know about bond order.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:05 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: EDTA
Replies: 3
Views: 86

Re: EDTA

I think it is because the non-doublebonded Oyxgens have a -1 formal charge and the double bonded oxygens have a formal charge of 0. The -1 formal charge allows oxygen to want to bind. I also think that the double bonded oxygens are often on the other side of the bonded oxygens this could contribute ...
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 4:01 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: 6A13b
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: 6A13b

Boron is relatively electropositive and especially when it is bounded to fluorine, the negative charge is further distributed away from Boron. This allows it to want to accept an electron pair, making it a Lewis acid.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:58 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands and Coordination Numbers
Replies: 4
Views: 75

Re: Chelating Ligands and Coordination Numbers

I don't think it would necessarily be raised, but if a molecule chelates then less of that molecule is needed to bond to the metal. So there would just be less ligands needed in the coordinating complex. The coordinate number doesn't increase but there are less ligands, so the charge on the metal se...
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:52 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Organic Acids
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Organic Acids

What is an Organic acid and what do we need to know about it?
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Equilibrium Tables
Replies: 1
Views: 43

Re: Equilibrium Tables

No I don't believe we need to know anything about equilibrium tables in terms of calculations but I think we need a simple grasp on the concept of equilibrium as a whole. Since he didn't cover it in lecture it probably won't be on the final.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:44 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity for a trigonal planar molecule
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Re: Polarity for a trigonal planar molecule

The molecule is polar just because of the hydrogen bonded to one of the Oxygens. This makes the entire molecule not symmetrical, making it polar, even though the shape of the central nitrogen is trigonal planar.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:40 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: 6B 1
Replies: 2
Views: 68

Re: 6B 1

I believe the question says it is reduced TO 12% of its total, not reduced by 12%.

You would use -Log[0.12] and compared to Log(1), which is 0 the difference is just the value of -Log[0.12]
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: HW 6.B #9
Replies: 1
Views: 42

Re: HW 6.B #9

pH=-Log[Hydronium ion concentration]
pOH=-Log[Hydroxide concentration]

pH+pOH=14, so
14-pOH=pH

You can convert all of these into pH and then rank them.
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:30 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Cisplatin binding
Replies: 1
Views: 47

Re: Cisplatin binding

The two chlorines in cisplatin get replaced by Water which bonds to the nitrogen lone pairs on two guanines. I believe these are hydrogen bonds with the Oxygen facing towards the Platinum
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Dec 05, 2019 3:24 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Vitamin B12
Replies: 1
Views: 57

Vitamin B12

What is the biological significance of B12?
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:48 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Why are inorganic acids stronger?
Replies: 8
Views: 109

Re: Why are inorganic acids stronger?

Elizabeth Johnson 1I wrote:
Giselle Littleton 3K wrote:Inorganic compounds are more likely to completely deprotonate.


can someone define what deprotonate means?


Deprotonate is essentially just losing a proton, you can also think of this as losing a hydrogen+. (hydrogen has one proton)
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 24, 2019 5:39 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Class
Replies: 4
Views: 90

Re: Class

Yeah its probably too late, sorry. But you can still do well in the class if you do well on the final and continue to do the homework and chem community!
by Indy Bui 1l
Wed Nov 20, 2019 11:33 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Why is CH2Cl2 polar?
Replies: 12
Views: 147

Re: Why is CH2Cl2 polar?

You should think of this molecule in the 3d form. In a tetrahedral, no matter where you put the atoms the Chlorine atoms will always be next to each other. I can't Draw a picture on here, but just look one up it might be helpful. The lewis structure looks like u can orient the chlorines to be opposi...
by Indy Bui 1l
Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:30 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: cations
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: cations

The smaller the cation the higher Polarizing power. Respectively, the larger the anion the higher its polarizability.

Molecules with more polarizability tend to have a more covalent character.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:47 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Model
Replies: 3
Views: 52

Re: VSEPR Model

You have to memorize them, don't rely on a table on the test. I believe you need to know bond angles, shape, and whether molecules are polar or not.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:45 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: london forces
Replies: 5
Views: 51

Re: london forces

All atoms have the potential to form temporary dipoles, due to electrons randomly moving into favorable positions. These temporary dipoles are London Forces.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 17, 2019 9:40 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape of H20
Replies: 3
Views: 57

Re: Molecular Shape of H20

The lone pairs cannot be on opposite sides of each other, this is due to the nature of tetrahedral shapes. if you put two lone pairs into a tetrahedral they will always be next to each other, not on opposite sides. Its hard to draw a tetrahedral model on here but looking one up might be helpful.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:26 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar and Nonpolar
Replies: 6
Views: 200

Re: Polar and Nonpolar

The best way to do this is to draw the lewis structures of each molecule. Once you draw the lewis structure and determine the shape you can figure out if its polar or not. Another option is drawing and canceling dipole moments on the lewis structures.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:02 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Pi and sigma bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 73

Pi and sigma bonds

Can someone explain why a a single bond is a sigma and why a double bond has a sigma and a pi bond, and the same for triple bonds? thanks
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 17, 2019 7:54 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: types of bonds
Replies: 14
Views: 532

Re: types of bonds

Yes, a triple bond consists of two pi bonds and one sigma bond.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:37 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: test 2
Replies: 16
Views: 157

Re: test 2

It will probably focus mainly on stuff after the midterm but that doesn't mean you can forget everything else we have learned.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 10, 2019 5:13 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Iodine
Replies: 6
Views: 72

Re: Iodine

Iodine has a larger atomic radius and more electrons than the other halogens. This makes it stronger.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:49 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Remembering bond angles
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Remembering bond angles

Is there any easy way to remember bond angles as they correspond to shape? or do I just have to memorize them as they are.Thanks!
by Indy Bui 1l
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:31 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Dino nuggets 11b
Replies: 3
Views: 166

Re: Dino nuggets 11b

Awesome thank you for the responses!
by Indy Bui 1l
Wed Nov 06, 2019 2:10 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Molarity Formula / Calculation
Replies: 5
Views: 1745

Re: Molarity Formula / Calculation

Molarity is Moles/Liters. You can think about it as an amount (moles) that is diluted by a liquid (liters). So in a dilution, only the amount of liters changes and the moles stay constant and you can use the equation m1v1=m2v2. (m being moles and v being volume in liters) . Just be familiar with the...
by Indy Bui 1l
Tue Nov 05, 2019 9:47 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Dino nuggets 11b
Replies: 3
Views: 166

Dino nuggets 11b

Can someone please explain Dino Nuggets 11.b) Here is the question for reference "If a hydrogen electron goes from n=6 to n=4, will ∆E be negative or positive? Will the energy of the photon emitted be negative or positive?" I don't quite understand how to determine if the energy of the pho...
by Indy Bui 1l
Tue Nov 05, 2019 8:37 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizing Power Periodic Trend
Replies: 4
Views: 55

Re: Polarizing Power Periodic Trend

Im a bit confused, so do small cations cause greater polarizing power or do larger cations?
by Indy Bui 1l
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:36 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: Ionization Energy

Second ionization energy is higher, because with one less electron there is greater pull from the nucleus on the remaining electron, and less electron-electron repulsion. This greater pull makes it much harder to remove the second electron.
by Indy Bui 1l
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:34 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: Ionization Energy

The second ionization energy is higher for all elements
by Indy Bui 1l
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:18 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: 0KE electron?
Replies: 2
Views: 69

Re: 0KE electron?

Dr. Lavelle mentioned during lecture that there was a current attached to the detector. I believe the detector was positively charged, possibly attracting the electron and detecting it, without it having a true Kinetic Energy. Although theoretically, it is emitted with 0KE, im not sure that it works...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1F.19
Replies: 5
Views: 63

Re: 1F.19

Ionization energy (the energy required to remove an electron) is typically lower for s-block metals. Search up an image of ionization energy in relation to the period table for a more visual answer. But generally, ionization energy gets higher as you move from left to right of the periodic table and...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 20, 2019 10:03 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: The equation
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: The equation

viewtopic.php?t=5742

Dr. Lavelle answered a similar question here ^^

Hope this helps
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:31 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: p- orbital
Replies: 3
Views: 51

Re: p- orbital

Technically you can label the axes in any order you want, however the general rule is: x, y, z Hund's rule states, however, electrons must fill one in each P axes before they are paired. This means that there has to be one electron in Px, Py, and Pz, before there are paired electrons in Px, for exam...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:24 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Shared Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 78

Re: Shared Electrons

You have to refer to Hund's rule. Each orbital (for example Px,Py,Pz) must be filled with one electron before you pair electrons. Take the element Nitrogen for example. Nitrogen's orbital notation at its ground state would be written as 1s1 2s2 2p3 In the P state, nitrogen has three unpaired electro...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:09 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Work Function
Replies: 9
Views: 158

Re: Work Function

Threshold frequency refers to the minimum possible frequency of light needed to eject an electron from a metal's surface. Work function refers to the minimum energy level needed to eject an electron from a metal's surface. Thats the main difference; threshold frequency refers to the minimum frequenc...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 13, 2019 11:03 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Emission Spectrum
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: Emission Spectrum

These line groups represent changes in energy levels for electrons. When electrons drop an energy level (n=2 to n=1) then energy is emitted. Depending on which energy level the electron is dropping from and to, the atom emits different frequencies of lights. Experimenters measured these wavelengths ...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:53 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Photons and Electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Re: Photons and Electrons

Yes, electrons generally interact with only One proton. Electrons are only ejected if the protons have enough energy, this is gained through increasing the frequency of light, not just the intensity. Once the threshold is passed, increasing intensity produces more photons and more photons interact w...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:44 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Electrons and High Intensity Light
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Re: Electrons and High Intensity Light

I believe this concept refers to the particle properties of light. If light was just a wave then increasing the intensity of light should eject electrons, but that wasn't what happened in experiments. Energy has to be high enough per photon to induce electron removal from a metal surface. Increasing...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:35 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Symbol N Subscript A
Replies: 2
Views: 58

Re: Symbol N Subscript A

I believe N subscript A refers to avagodro's number.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:26 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: When to use the Planck's Constant?
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: When to use the Planck's Constant?

Planck's constant is used to relate the relationship between frequency and the energy of a proton, so it is used in the equation E=hv, h being Planck's constant.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:15 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Diatomic Molecules Vs. Ions
Replies: 2
Views: 57

Re: Diatomic Molecules Vs. Ions

An easy way for me to remember the 7 diatomic elements is: HOFBrINCl - H2,O2,F2,Br2,I2,N2,Cl2. Hydrogen, oxygen, fluorine, bromine, Iodine, Nitrogen, Chlorine
it sounds like Hoffbrinkle, hope this helps!
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Formula Unit
Replies: 3
Views: 85

Re: Formula Unit

No, it is not mathematically different than molecules or atoms. Use avagodro's number and it won't impact your calculations.
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 06, 2019 11:05 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Calculate using kg or g?
Replies: 13
Views: 443

Re: Calculate using kg or g?

It depends on the question. If you are using a formula that requires kg then of course convert to kg for the calculations or vice versa. In terms of your answer, I don't believe you will be marked incorrect for either form. Use proper judgement, if the question asks for your answer in grams then do ...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 06, 2019 10:07 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Combustion
Replies: 17
Views: 585

Re: Combustion

Combustion is essentially the reaction between a hydrocarbon or organic compound (C3H4 for example) and oxygen gas (O2), this usually occurs through burning. The products that are formed are always Water (H2O) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2). Here is a simple example combustion reaction with methane: Unbal...
by Indy Bui 1l
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:34 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: When do zeros count?
Replies: 5
Views: 82

Re: When do zeros count?

Leading zeroes don't count. For example, "0.001" or "002" each only have one significant figure. Any zeroes coming before a number do not count towards sig figs. Sandwiched zeroes do, however, count "1001" has four sig figs and "202" has three. zeroes coming a...
by Indy Bui 1l
Thu Oct 03, 2019 12:46 am
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: M 15
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: M 15

You need to solve parts a) and b) in order to solve part c. The mass of AlCl2 you calculated in part B) is used as the theoretical yield. The question gives the actual yield as 300g. All you need to do is solve the equation 100% * (Actual Yield)/(Theoretical Yield). For my answer I got 100%* ((300g)...

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