Search found 39 matches

by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 9:32 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Molecular Shape
Replies: 3
Views: 20

Re: Molecular Shape

The surface area of the shape is important when it comes to dipole moments. If the two molecules expose more surface area to one another, then they have more London attractions. The molecules will be highly polarizable and have a greater intermolecular force than two molecules that expose less surfa...
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 9:26 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge Placement
Replies: 4
Views: 27

Re: Formal Charge Placement

Negative charges tend to be put on the more electronegative atom, while the positive charge is put on the atom affected by the electronegative atom. Look at SO2. There is a negative charge on the Oxygen (the more electronegative atom), and a positive charge on Sulfur (the element affected by the ele...
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 9:20 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge Cancellation
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: Formal Charge Cancellation

Exactly. Look at CO for example. The lewis structure would indicate a triple bond between the two atoms. If we are to fill the octet correctly, the final formal charge for Oxygen is +1 and the final formal charge for Carbon is -1. These two cancel out to 0, which is the overall charge of the molecule.
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 9:17 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Best Formal Charge
Replies: 7
Views: 55

Re: Best Formal Charge

For the question right above this comment:

Exactly. Atoms such as fluorine and oxygen are highly electronegative and are able to pull electrons closer to themselves. Putting a negative on them only makes sense because they have a natural tendency to be negative in a molecule.
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Nov 12, 2019 9:11 am
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 42

Re: Sigma & Pi Bonds

Pi bonds are also more commonly found in double and triple bonds, while they are not included in single bonds. Pi bonds add bond strength to the bonds - hence why double and triple bonds are stronger than single bonds. All types of bonds have sigma bonds.
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:40 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Exceptions to the Octet Rule Question
Replies: 5
Views: 28

Re: Exceptions to the Octet Rule Question

Only N, C, F and O follow the octet rule. The exceptions are when radicals are involved.
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:37 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Favorable Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: Favorable Bonds

Although N and O have favorable bonds, certain structures require them to have more or fewer bonds - causing them to have a charge. For example, NO+ shows a triple bond between the N and the O. The N is pleased with a formal charge of 0, but the O has a formal charge of +1, which causes the positive...
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:32 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Radicals
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Radicals

This is more of an organic chemistry topic when you have to draw resonance structures regarding radical molecules. In orgo, the radical is most commonly found on the C, but in general, any atom can exhibit a radical. Radicals are notable when they appear on structures that should have their octet fi...
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:29 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal Charges
Replies: 15
Views: 47

Re: Formal Charges

It is best to have the negative charge on the most electronegative atom in the molecule, and the positive charge on the least electronegative atom in the molecule.
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 08, 2019 1:28 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Midterm grades
Replies: 26
Views: 138

Re: Midterm grades

Think about it. There were some long questions, and because we had to write in pen - much of it would be messy. I would be surprised if we get our grades back before next week. Also, I think that we will get the papers back, as it had a scoring sheet for the students to see, and we were allowed to t...
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:14 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Distinguishing a coordinate covalent bond
Replies: 5
Views: 30

Re: Distinguishing a coordinate covalent bond

You have to remember the scale for covalent vs ionic character. If the difference between the electronegativities of the two atoms are less than 1.5, then it is a covalent bond.
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:10 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charges on Atoms Summed in Ions?
Replies: 6
Views: 23

Re: Formal Charges on Atoms Summed in Ions?

Also, the more formal charges there are that equal to zero, the more stable the molecule actually is.
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:08 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: hybrid structure
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: hybrid structure

Hybrid structures are just resonance structures interpreted through one diagram. The double bonds are represented as one solid and one dotted, and there are enough electrons on each atom considering a double bond is present. Any bond can have resonance.
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:41 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How to know where each atom should go for bonding?
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: How to know where each atom should go for bonding?

If you are looking at examples such as ONF from question 2B.1, you would see that to get a zero formal charge, O needs two bonds, N needs three, and F needs 1. Since N has the most bonding possibilities, N would be the central atom, and the O and F would be around it.
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Oct 29, 2019 8:37 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 2B. 1C
Replies: 5
Views: 35

Re: 2B. 1C

You can also try checking the formal charge. If we were to put a double bond between the N and the F, and a single bond between the N and the O, the formal charge for F would be +1, and the formal charge for O would be -1. This is worse than the zero formal charges across the board when the double b...
by Manav Govil 4A
Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:35 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron configuration for Cerium
Replies: 2
Views: 11

Re: Electron configuration for Cerium

Cerium is actually the first element in the Lanthanoid f-block, giving it the configuration: [Xe] 4f1 5d1 6s2. Lanthanum is part of the d-block with a configuration of [Xe] 5d1 6s2.
by Manav Govil 4A
Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:30 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Shielding
Replies: 7
Views: 32

Re: Shielding

Think of it like people around a campfire. The people close to the campfire will receive the most warmth, will people farther away won't receive as much. Therefore, the people farther away are more likely to go to a different fire where they get more warmth. The people close to the campfire are the ...
by Manav Govil 4A
Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:23 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Yet Another Electron Spin Question
Replies: 5
Views: 63

Re: Yet Another Electron Spin Question

I don't think so, but it is an interesting concept to think about.
by Manav Govil 4A
Wed Oct 23, 2019 1:22 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Radioactive elements
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Radioactive elements

Why don't we compare the periodic trends for radioactive elements? For example, according to the trends, Francium should have a larger atomic radius than Caesium, but we don't mention Francium or any other group 7 elements for that matter. Also, how do we compare the trends for the Lanthanoids and a...
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:41 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Yet Another Electron Spin Question
Replies: 5
Views: 63

Re: Yet Another Electron Spin Question

The electrons would not collide with one another, but repel each other when they get close, shifting into a different spin. I think that is what happens, but I'm not a 100% sure.
by Manav Govil 4A
Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:38 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Test Question
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: Test Question

I believe that the test might be more calculation heavy, but have parts where we might need to explain a certain circumstance such as explaining the trends. I took AP chem, and that is what we had to do. I acknowledge this class may be more difficult, so it might adopt a different formula for tests,...
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 17, 2019 4:11 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Advice for studying
Replies: 50
Views: 261

Re: Advice for studying

My main way of studying is reading the entire chapter and then doing all the homework problems. If I do not understand any of the homework problems, I either go here, or go to my TA. If there is something I do not understand, I seek out help.
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 17, 2019 4:08 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals, 1D.11
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Orbitals, 1D.11

Nice explanation!

Anyway, these are what I got:

a. 1 orbital
b. 5 orbitals
c. 3 orbitals
d. 7 orbitals
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 17, 2019 4:06 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: HW Help
Replies: 3
Views: 23

Re: HW Help

I got this:

a. 3
b. 1
c. 4
d. 1

I just wrote the number of orbitals.
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 17, 2019 4:03 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: HW D13
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: HW D13

This is what I got after doing the question:

b. There are five values: 2, 1, 0, -1 and -2

c. There are three values: 1, 0 and -1

d. There are four subshells: 4s, 4p, 4d, and 4f

I hope this helps.
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 17, 2019 3:57 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Spin State
Replies: 17
Views: 59

Re: Spin State

A +1/2 spin is spinning up, while a -1/2 spin is spinning down. Remember, this is not like the electron is spinning north or south if it is spinning up or down. They are spinning in different directions. That's about it.
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: For future tests
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: For future tests

We should know where to apply the equation and how to use it, but not the specific experiments of history behind it. Tests - based on the first one - are more calculation based rather than history-based.
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:33 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Final Grade
Replies: 5
Views: 2264

Re: Final Grade

From Lavelle's website: "Each test and exam has a total score but is not assigned a grade. Only at the end of the class when the class average score (out of 500 points) is known are final grades assigned. This class does not use a curve. Group learning (Chemistry Community, Study Groups, Peer L...
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:32 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Planck's constant
Replies: 9
Views: 102

Re: Planck's constant

The equation helps us calculate the energy of light. Planks constant has the units: J*s, which cancels out with the frequency units: 1/s. It helps us find the energy in J (Joules).
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:27 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Polar vs Non polar
Replies: 15
Views: 602

Re: Polar vs Non polar

I love polar vs nonpolar stuff! The polarity of a compound depends on the charges and electronegativity of its structure. The electronegativity of atoms can be found on a periodic table such as this: http://www.thecatalyst.org/electabl.html Using the values from the periodic table above, you can mea...
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Planck's Constant
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: Planck's Constant

Planck's constant is not really explored in depth in high school/college chem. If you would like to learn about the history of Planck's Constant, I recommend this Wikipedia article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planck_constant
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 10, 2019 8:08 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Frequency
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: Frequency

If you're interested in frequency, I recommend reading the Wikipedia page behind it:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency

v (or nu) can also be expressed in Hz (Hertz), which is pretty interesting.
by Manav Govil 4A
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:19 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Fundamental E.1
Replies: 5
Views: 47

Re: Fundamental E.1

by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 03, 2019 2:13 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Does molar mass count for sig figs?
Replies: 6
Views: 67

Re: Does molar mass count for sig figs?

The molar mass from the periodic table does not affect our calculations, but the molar mass we get from a question or from our calculations do affect our calculations.
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 03, 2019 2:11 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: significant figures
Replies: 5
Views: 48

Re: significant figures

I posted this on another thread...so here is a copy:

What tricks me up the most is the zeroes involved in sig-figs. I'll show you why:

250000 has 2 sig-figs
250000. has 6-sig-figs
250.000 has 6 sig-figs
250.001 has 6 sig-figs
1.00025 has 6 sig-figs
0.00025 has 2 sig-figs
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 03, 2019 2:05 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Powers of 10
Replies: 10
Views: 78

Re: Powers of 10

An important note: powers of ten are not counted in sig-figs!!!!! Both 0.000025 and 2.5 * 10^-5 have 2 sig-figs. Powers of 10 are really just used for convenience in a calculation. For example, instead of dividing 1.03 moles by 45 mL to find the molarity, it is better to divide 1.03 moles by 45 * 10...
by Manav Govil 4A
Thu Oct 03, 2019 1:58 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: General Rules of Sig Figs with Example Questions
Replies: 4
Views: 47

Re: General Rules of Sig Figs with Example Questions

What tricks me up the most is the zeroes involved in sig-figs. I'll show you why: 250000 has 2 sig-figs 250000. has 6-sig-figs 250.000 has 6 sig-figs 250.001 has 6 sig-figs 1.00025 has 6 sig-figs 0.00025 has 2 sig-figs You have to memorize what effects sig-figs so that you know how many sig-figs the...
by Manav Govil 4A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 1:37 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Dilution
Replies: 9
Views: 118

Re: Dilution

Dilutions are real interesting. The moles of the solute do not change because you are not adding or subtracting moles from the solute when you are diluting. When you dilute, you are basically adding or subtracting the solvent (in most cases water). This does change the molarity of the solute (moles/...
by Manav Govil 4A
Wed Oct 02, 2019 1:29 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: G 25
Replies: 7
Views: 73

Re: G 25

The thing is that after 69 doublings, less than one molecule would remain in the 10 mL of the diluted solution. At that point, the solution does not have any health benefits whatsoever. When a solution has less than one molecule of a specific substance (especially if that substance is intended to ai...

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