Search found 85 matches

by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 23, 2020 11:05 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Finding n
Replies: 6
Views: 21

Re: Finding n

For electrochemistry in this case, you can identify the n (as moles/electron in this case) from balancing your redox reaction since redox reactions involve the transfer of electrons.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 23, 2020 11:01 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: salt bridge
Replies: 5
Views: 11

Re: salt bridge

Salt bridges are present in order to maintain charge balance because in the case of charge imbalance, the reaction would essentially stop.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:58 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: porous disc
Replies: 5
Views: 10

Re: porous disc

Yes, they essentially have the same roles of keeping the cells neutral but the only difference is that with a porous disk, you don't place the anode and cathode in different beakers but rather together in the same solution.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:54 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: oxidation numbers
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: oxidation numbers

What I usually do is identify the ones that are unchanging like how oxygen and ozone have oxidation numbers of zero. From, there I'd find the oxidation numbers for the transition metals or whatever other element/compounds there are. Based on the changes in oxidation numbers of some species in the re...
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 23, 2020 10:49 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidizing/Reducing Agents
Replies: 11
Views: 23

Re: Oxidizing/Reducing Agents

Oxidizing agents gain electrons and are reduced in a reaction whereas reducing agents lose electrons and are oxidized in a reaction.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 15, 2020 5:32 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Intensive and Extensive Properties
Replies: 7
Views: 25

Re: Intensive and Extensive Properties

Extensive properties are dependent upon the amount that you have like density whereas intensive properties aren't dependent on the amount present at all like specific heat capacity.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 15, 2020 5:28 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Negative work
Replies: 14
Views: 32

Re: Negative work

Work is negative when a system is doing work because that's what it loses hence the negative. Conversely, it's positive if something else is doing work on the system.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 15, 2020 5:25 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: P1/P2
Replies: 10
Views: 49

Re: P1/P2

Pressure and volume are inversely proportional to each other therefore depending on what you're given, the ratio will always be V2/V1 or P1/P2.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 15, 2020 5:22 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs and K value
Replies: 3
Views: 16

Re: Gibbs and K value

The effects can be seen in the equation deltaG = -RTlnK. If K is greater than 1, then delta G is negative indicating spontaneity whereas if K is less than 1, then delta G is positive indicating a nonspontaneous process.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 15, 2020 5:15 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard Enthalpies of Formation
Replies: 10
Views: 22

Re: Standard Enthalpies of Formation

Elements in their most standard state (pure elements) possess an enthalpy of formation of 0 like graphite.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:37 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Calculating K
Replies: 15
Views: 58

Re: Calculating K

The equation has to always be balanced to find both K and Q. The only difference is that K is for when it's at equilibrium whereas Q is not.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:32 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: delta U
Replies: 8
Views: 30

Re: delta U

Adiabetic essentially means that no heat is entering or exiting, therefore it'd equate to 0 which would make deltaU equal to work.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:28 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Weak acid/base
Replies: 14
Views: 42

Re: Weak acid/base

It's best to memorize them, but something like the pH scale and dissociability can indicate the strengths of acids/bases if given.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:25 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Volume and Pressure
Replies: 8
Views: 25

Re: Volume and Pressure

Volume and pressure are inversely proportional so if volume increases, pressure must decrease and vice versa, but just remember that pressure can increase without changing volume by adding inert gases.
by HuyHa_2H
Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:16 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Hess's Law
Replies: 10
Views: 33

Re: Hess's Law

Enthalpy is a state function therefore the total enthalpy can be summed up which allows Hess's law to be used.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:35 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy of sublimation?
Replies: 8
Views: 32

Re: Enthalpy of sublimation?

We will eventually have to calculate the enthalpy of sublimation and is represented by the sum of the heat of fusion and the heat of vaporization.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:30 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: internal energy
Replies: 11
Views: 40

Re: internal energy

Delta U is the internal energy. Q represents heat. Utilizing the two is through the equation: Delta U = q + w where w is the net work.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:27 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Phase Changes
Replies: 17
Views: 43

Re: Phase Changes

Looking on a heating curve, as the temperature reaches a certain point, it will remain constant before increasing again. That constant temperature is where the phase change occurs.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:18 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Calorimeter
Replies: 8
Views: 26

Re: Calorimeter

A calorimeter is just a "thermally insulated container" to measure changes of heat while a bomb calorimeter is the same thing but can withstand more pressure.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Feb 01, 2020 2:15 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy vs Change in Internal Energy
Replies: 4
Views: 13

Re: Enthalpy vs Change in Internal Energy

Enthalpy is just the heat absorbed or released during a reaction and you can just consider the internal energy as just the sum of all of the total energy contained in the system.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:51 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Celsius and Kelvin
Replies: 11
Views: 47

Re: Celsius and Kelvin

The two aren't numerically equal as there's a 273.15 difference between Celsius and Kelvin, but it'd probably be more useful if Kelvin were to be used as it's often compatible with many equations that involve temperature.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:42 am
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Endothermic values
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: Endothermic values

Adding the signs would be necessary otherwise people can't really tell if the reaction is endothermic or exothermic.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:38 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5.61f
Replies: 5
Views: 20

Re: 5.61f

Water is a solvent, indicating that it's a liquid which won't affect the equilibrium. Only aqueous and gaseous reactants or products can affect it.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:34 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Partial Pressure
Replies: 5
Views: 19

Re: Partial Pressure

Increasing the partial pressure of something from one side causes the partial pressure of whatever else is on that same side to decrease and everything on the opposite side increases, and vice versa to maintain the proper ratio.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 25, 2020 2:25 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Partial Pressure vs Pressure
Replies: 7
Views: 43

Re: Partial Pressure vs Pressure

You can think of partial pressure as relating to individual reactants or products while pressure applies to the entire system simultaneously.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:46 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ICE Tables
Replies: 3
Views: 26

ICE Tables

Just as confirmation, you know to use ICE tables if you're given K and the initial concentrations/pressures correct? Is there anything else to identify in the problem to know if ICE charts should be used?
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:43 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Thermodynamic Stability
Replies: 6
Views: 30

Re: Thermodynamic Stability

You just look at the K value and compare them. Smaller K values indicate more thermodynamical stability and the opposite if the K value is bigger.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:10 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5 percent rule
Replies: 10
Views: 44

Re: 5 percent rule

You use the 5 percent rule to make sure that the approximation that you made where x is 0 in the denominator when k is less than 10^-3 is valid and should be used every time you solve for equilibrium concentrations using the ICE chart.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 2:01 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 6E.1
Replies: 1
Views: 22

Re: 6E.1

There are two equations that can be made for this problem because it's polyprotic. The first equation is H2SO4 + H2O = H3O + HSO4. But because it can still deprotonate, the second equation is HSO4 + H2O = H3O + SO4. You then make an ICE chart for this where the initial concentration of HSO4 and H3O ...
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Jan 18, 2020 1:25 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Ideal Gas Law
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: Ideal Gas Law

The ideal gas law is typically used to convert between pressure and concentration. So, if you're given concentration and you're supposed to find Kp or vice versa, you know that you have to apply the equation.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Jan 09, 2020 3:07 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Effect of High Initial Concentration of Reactant
Replies: 5
Views: 32

Re: Effect of High Initial Concentration of Reactant

Yes, because the equilibrium constant will never change so you must maintain the product to reactant ratio. So if the reactant were to increase then the products would increase to maintain the proper ratio.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:56 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K and Q
Replies: 5
Views: 19

Re: K and Q

Yes, because the equation used to find both are the exact same. The K value is when the reaction is at equilibrium so if Q equates to that then the reaction is definitely at equilibrium as well.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:52 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: How to interpret reactions based on quotient in relation to equilibrium constant
Replies: 5
Views: 36

Re: How to interpret reactions based on quotient in relation to equilibrium constant

If Q<K, then the forward reaction is favored, resulting in more product to reach equilibrium while if Q>K, then the reverse reaction is favored which results in more reactants to reach equilibrium.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Jan 09, 2020 2:47 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: 5I.9
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: 5I.9

I'd assume that it'd be Kp because units of pressure is given, but I don't think it should be too concerning because you can convert between concentration and pressure anyways.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Jan 09, 2020 12:09 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Constant
Replies: 2
Views: 16

Re: Equilibrium Constant

The equilibrium constant is just the ratio of product to reactant. With the constant, you can determine the concentration or partial pressure for either one when given the constant and the reactant or product. Also, if either reactant or product changes to a certain amount, you can determine the amo...
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:39 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole Moments Cancel in Tetrahedral?
Replies: 5
Views: 37

Re: Dipole Moments Cancel in Tetrahedral?

If you draw out the proper shape, then obviously the molecule will be polar because of dipoles that aren't canceling each other out. So, it's only if the molecules are the same where the dipoles would cancel each other out.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Nonpolar and polar
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: Nonpolar and polar

You should see if the dipoles cancel out in the molecule. If they cancel, then it's nonpolar and if they don't then it's polar.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:04 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Resonance
Replies: 1
Views: 16

Re: Resonance

You would typically only find the hybridization for the most stable resonance structure so I don't think you'd need to show the other resonance structures only the stable one.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 2:01 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Question 2F.3
Replies: 1
Views: 15

Re: Question 2F.3

The more stable structure would be preferred. So, it's the one where S has two double bonds each connected to an O and a lone pair on top of S as well. Count the sigma and pi bonds for that structure.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:58 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Lone pairs
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: Lone pairs

Yes, they do because they're also electron groups.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:47 am
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: pH vs. pOH
Replies: 17
Views: 127

Re: pH vs. pOH

pH measures acidity whereas pOH measures basicity. Both are primarily measured on a scale from 0-14 so if the pH is 4 then the pOH is 10 and so on.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:42 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: HCl vs HF
Replies: 19
Views: 98

Re: HCl vs HF

Cl is less electronegative than F which makes it easier to dissociate which makes HCl the stronger acid.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:36 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted Acid and base
Replies: 8
Views: 41

Re: Bronsted Acid and base

A Lewis acid accepts an e- pair while a Lewis base donates an e- pair. Bronsted acids donate protons while bronsted bases accepts protons.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:31 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Resonance Structures and hybridization
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Re: Resonance Structures and hybridization

I think you're supposed to use the hybridization of the most stable resonance structure which you can find through formal charge.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 30, 2019 7:28 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Proton acceptor and proton donor?
Replies: 33
Views: 140

Re: Proton acceptor and proton donor?

Bronsted Acids donate protons and Bronsted Bases accepts protons.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:47 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: When to Use Formal Charge
Replies: 4
Views: 47

Re: When to Use Formal Charge

Formal charge tells you which resonance structure is more stable so with it you'll be able to find the preferred form of a molecule
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:45 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Boiling Point
Replies: 7
Views: 83

Re: Boiling Point

Both SiH4 and SiF4 are nonpolar which mean that they only display LDF forces. So when both molecules have LDF you look at the size. The F is more bigger than H so SiF4 is the bigger one of the two which makes it have stronger LDF forces so higher boiling point.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:28 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 15
Views: 81

Re: Sigma and Pi Bonds

You don't need to order the bonds. Just know how many sigma and pi bonds are present in each kind of bond (Triple Bond = 1 Sigma Bond and 2 Pi Bonds,etc.)
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:04 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding Rules
Replies: 6
Views: 51

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Rules

Each lone pair is a potential hydrogen bonding site, so in your case a nitrogen atom with TWO lone pairs would have TWO potential hydrogen bonding sites.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Nov 21, 2019 9:52 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F 15
Replies: 5
Views: 28

Re: 3F 15

You would consider the weight if both molecules are not polar which is not the case here. AsF3 displays dipole-dipole interactions which indicates it's polar while AsF5 only displays LDF forces so it's not polar. Dipole-dipole is stronger than any LDF so AsF3 would have the higher boiling point.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:13 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR and Polarity
Replies: 4
Views: 24

VSEPR and Polarity

Just for confirmation, what do you generally look at in a VSEPR model to determine polarity of a molecule?
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:12 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: polar vs nonpolar
Replies: 6
Views: 34

Re: polar vs nonpolar

Generally, you can't really determine polarity just off of the molecular formula which is why you use the VSEPR models to determine it as it is the actual accurate representation of the molecule.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 5:01 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: sigma bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: sigma bonds

Depending on which two atoms that have bonds together, they may have a single bond (1 sigma bond), a double bond (1 sigma and 1 pi bond), or a triple bond (1 sigma and 2 pi bonds).
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:59 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Symmetry and Polarity
Replies: 13
Views: 75

Re: Symmetry and Polarity

Symmetry shouldn't really be what you're looking for to determine polarity but rather use the VSEPR models instead because VSEPR models are the actual representation and Lewis structures are just inaccurate base models.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:41 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent or Angular
Replies: 13
Views: 97

Re: Bent or Angular

Bent and angular are the same thing, but I'd probably use angular just because it's how the book calls it.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:08 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole-dipole, LDF, HB
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Re: Dipole-dipole, LDF, HB

Dipole-dipole is when the positive end of a molecule and the negative end of another molecule attract, LDF is when electrons create temporary dipoles, and hydrogen bonds is when a hydrogen atom bonds with a highly electronegative atom (N,F,O). In terms of energy needed to break these interactions, L...
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:22 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole Interactions
Replies: 1
Views: 15

Re: Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole Interactions

It's when a molecule with a dipole comes in contact with an atom with no dipole. The electrons in the atom then react to the molecule to create a dipole in the atom itself.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:08 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Electronegativity on Dipoles
Replies: 3
Views: 18

Re: Electronegativity on Dipoles

The bigger the electronegativity difference, the greater the dipole moment will be. And yes, if there if is any difference in the electronegativity, then you should consider that there is a dipole moment.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:46 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Differences
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Differences

Ionization is the process of forming ions by losing or gaining electrons, electron affinity is like how likely the atom is to gain an electron, and electronegativity is how likely the atom would take an electron.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:40 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Bond Strength
Replies: 12
Views: 72

Re: Bond Strength

Aside from looking at the electronegativity aspect, I think of it as how covalent bonds pretty much involve the sharing of electrons whereas ionic bonds involve the attractions of opposite charged ions which makes it much more harder to break.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:18 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Anions and Cations
Replies: 9
Views: 50

Re: Anions and Cations

Anions gain electrons whereas cations lose electrons so basically anions get heavier and cations get lighter.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:14 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: central atom
Replies: 16
Views: 144

Re: central atom

The electron with the least electronegativity is the one that is the central atom but pretty much most of the time it's the element with the least amount of atoms in the molecule.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:11 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Electrons Moving Around
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Electrons Moving Around

Electrons don't really leave, but rather they are shared among atoms to form ions.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 2:04 am
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Significance of sigma and pi bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 34

Re: Significance of sigma and pi bonds

Pretty much single bonds contain one sigma bond, double bonds contain a sigma and a pi bond, and triple bonds have one sigma and two pi bonds.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:52 am
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: When to use the de Broglie equation?
Replies: 5
Views: 48

Re: When to use the de Broglie equation?

Yeah, you pretty much use the De Broglie equation when you're given or given enough to find either the mass, velocity, or wavelength of an object that is not massless.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:45 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Noble Gases
Replies: 10
Views: 32

Re: Noble Gases

Noble gases have full valence shells which make them not needing to take or give any electrons which exclude them from the trends.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:41 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Mass of an Electron
Replies: 14
Views: 148

Re: Mass of an Electron

Electrons in any element or whatever else they're present in all have the same size which is 9.10938356 × 10^-31 kilograms.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:39 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Formal Charge of an Atom
Replies: 5
Views: 66

Re: Formal Charge of an Atom

Formal charge is calculated by utilizing the formula: Valence Electrons - (# of Lone Electron Pairs + # of Bonding Electrons/2).
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:33 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron removal
Replies: 11
Views: 82

Re: Electron removal

The further the electrons are from the nucleus, the less the force of attraction is from the protons to the electrons, hence the further electrons are easier to remove.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Nov 02, 2019 1:30 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of light
Replies: 13
Views: 79

Re: Speed of light

Electromagnetic radiation move at the same speed as the speed of light hence we use the constant 2.998 x 10^8 m/s for both subjects.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:53 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Spectral Series
Replies: 3
Views: 49

Re: Spectral Series

Each series has their own range of wavelengths. Once you've found the wavelength the photon's at, then you can just link them to whichever series involves that range.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:50 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Paired Electrons
Replies: 5
Views: 37

Re: Paired Electrons

To add on to that, each orbital is placed one electron at a time. When all of the orbitals have been placed and there are still more electrons, then each one will be paired up with each electron that was already placed in the orbitals.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:45 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 17
Views: 109

Re: De Broglie's Equation

Photons don't have mass so the equation isn't applicable for it.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:42 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Wave Function
Replies: 5
Views: 76

Re: Wave Function

Wave functions just tell us what the shape of the orbitals so you can basically tell where the electron's going to be.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 19, 2019 2:37 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Quantum equations
Replies: 5
Views: 29

Re: Quantum equations

Honestly, any unit of distance in the metric system per a unit of time is fine because they can all be converted anyway, but normally people write it as m/s or maybe unless otherwise stated.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:42 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Amplitude
Replies: 12
Views: 103

Re: Amplitude

Amplitude just indicates how high or low the waves themselves travel. But in terms of its relationship to frequency and wavelength, it probably doesn't matter as amplitude isn't present in the equations that we've been using so far.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:34 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Black Body Radiation
Replies: 12
Views: 113

Re: Black Body Radiation

More specifically, it's thermal electromagnetic radiation.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:31 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of Light
Replies: 41
Views: 966

Re: Speed of Light

The speed of light won't because it's a constant but sometimes they might be displayed differently due to sig figs and rounding and whatnot.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:29 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron After Excited State
Replies: 7
Views: 36

Re: Electron After Excited State

When the electron reaches an excited state, it jumps to a higher energy level where they release photons to go back to the original state.
by HuyHa_2H
Sat Oct 12, 2019 4:17 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Planck's Constant
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Re: Planck's Constant

The relationship is displayed in E(energy)=h(Planck's constant)v(frequency). Planck's constant is the constant of proportionality which shows the direct relationship between energy and frequency. The higher the frequency, the higher the energy output, and vice versa. The Planck's constant doesn't re...
by HuyHa_2H
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:06 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Percent or theoretical yield
Replies: 14
Views: 151

Re: Percent or theoretical yield

Percent yield is basically the ratio of actual yield to theoretical yield, and theoretical yield is the maximum amount of product that you can possibly get based off of your limiting reactant.
by HuyHa_2H
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:01 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Sig Figs

Usually when you're adding or subtracting you tend to round your answer to the least number of places to the decimal point in the problem. Ex: 1.234+1.2 gives you 2.434 but you round it to 2.4. And as for multiplying or dividing you literally just use the smallest number of sig figs out of the value...
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 7:03 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Formula Names
Replies: 7
Views: 61

Re: Formula Names

Most of the problems you'll do will require you to write out chemical equations so yeah, you'll pretty much have to remember polyatomic ions especially in case the question won't give you the chemical formula for the compounds that you'll need.
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 6:43 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Fractions in Balancing Equations
Replies: 11
Views: 131

Re: Fractions in Balancing Equations

Typically, if you can't use a whole number as a stoichiometric coefficient for whatever it is you're balancing is when you use a fraction. It's so you can just multiply every coefficient in the equation with the denominator of the fraction to get all the coefficients as whole numbers without messing...
by HuyHa_2H
Thu Oct 03, 2019 6:40 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Chemistry Community Question
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Re: Chemistry Community Question

I thought they were due this Friday, but apparently it's due this Sunday.

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