Search found 56 matches

by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:31 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Acids and Bases pka and pkb
Replies: 8
Views: 27

Re: Acids and Bases pka and pkb

A lower pKa indicates a stronger acid and a lower pKb is a stronger base, as pKa + pKb = 14
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:29 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ice table
Replies: 13
Views: 34

Re: ice table

They aren't included, since you wouldn't include them in the K expression.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:27 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: ICE table approximation
Replies: 8
Views: 14

Re: ICE table approximation

You take a look at the K value. If it is less than 10^-3, then you can approximate. If the K value is 10^-3, it can get a bit tricky, so I would still do the full calculation.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:25 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Equilibrium Constant
Replies: 7
Views: 24

Re: Equilibrium Constant

Since K=products/reactants. A small K value indicated that the numerator is being divided by a large denominator. So there are more reactants.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:22 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: PV=nRT
Replies: 13
Views: 49

Re: PV=nRT

This in relation to concentration (n/V). It's used mainly to calculate for the unknown variable.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:19 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: test 1
Replies: 9
Views: 31

Re: test 1

No, test one is only for chemical equilibrium and acids and bases
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Jan 23, 2020 2:18 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kc vs Kp
Replies: 19
Views: 50

Re: Kc vs Kp

It depends on what asked and given. If you are calculating molar concentration then you would use Kc.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:51 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: naming
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: naming

When it comes to alphabetizing, you look at the beginning of the compound itself, not the prefixes used.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:48 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand Names
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: Ligand Names

I believe that the ligands on the table are the principle ones that may come up during the final.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:44 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Lone Pairs in this Compound
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: Lone Pairs in this Compound

The subscript of two shows that there is double of what is inside the parentheses, therefore 2 N. The third one is the N that is on the outside in the HN.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:40 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: chelate
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: chelate

It also includes bidentate complexes, as chelating ligands refers to those that can make multiple (2 or more) bonds to the central metal atom.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:37 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C 1A
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: 9C 1A

iron is a naming exception when it comes to adding the -ate suffix, instead of ironate. We use the roman name of ferrum, then add the suffix.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:33 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Cyanido vs cyano
Replies: 5
Views: 33

Cyanido vs cyano

I'm confused on these two terms. The textbook uses the form cyanido, but Lavelle wrote cyano for a naming example in lecture. Can they be used interchangeably, or are they different?
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:30 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: -ate
Replies: 11
Views: 63

Re: -ate

-ate is used with there is a negative charge on the complex and is added to the end of the TM
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:29 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: sodium bisoxalato(diaqua)ferrate(III) (homework 9C.3D)
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: sodium bisoxalato(diaqua)ferrate(III) (homework 9C.3D)

3. I don't think there is a preference, but the textbook uses OH2 a lot, so i would stick with that format.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:15 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom
Replies: 6
Views: 30

Re: Hybridization with lone pairs on central atom

Yes since the regions of electron density correlates with the hybridization. 2 regions=sp and so on like without lone pairs.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:08 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization
Replies: 11
Views: 57

Re: hybridization

You begin with the Lewis structure that will provide you with the regions of electron density of the center atom. Form their you can determine the hybridization. 2 regions corresponds with ; 3= and so on.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:05 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: 2.57
Replies: 4
Views: 64

Re: 2.57

For the right carbon you use hybridized orbitals while the left carbon uses
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 4:01 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization Structure
Replies: 3
Views: 26

Re: Hybridization Structure

I was a little confused about that too.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:59 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Problem 3F10 b
Replies: 6
Views: 44

Re: Problem 3F10 b

Sydney Myers 4H wrote:
Daniel Martinez 1k wrote:Si2F2


Is this due to the shape? because Si2F2 would have a more linear structure, compared with a round structure of SiF4, and higher surface area makes for higher intermolecular forces, specifically London Dispersion Forces.

I believe this question is dependent on polarity, no shape for size.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:57 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F 15
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: 3F 15

This question has to do with polarity, not size. Since AsF3 is polar, it has stronger dipole-dipole interaction than AsF5, a nonpolar molecule.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:54 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding Rules
Replies: 6
Views: 51

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Rules

A hydrogen bond can occur for one lone pair of N,O, and F. Therefore, a nitrogen atom with 2 lone pairs can form 2 hydrogen bonds.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:50 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Homework 3F1
Replies: 4
Views: 40

Re: Homework 3F1

The question is asking what are the IMF of each molecule. For H2SeO4, due to its polarity, it has dipole-dipole and induced-induced. On top of that, it can also form hydrogen bonds.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:47 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: london forces
Replies: 9
Views: 42

Re: london forces

London forces depends on the size of a molecule. Since larger molecules are more polarizable they form stronger London forces.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:44 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: 3F.5
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: 3F.5

Butanol has a higher melting point, due to its ability to form hydrogen bonds.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:42 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole
Replies: 9
Views: 59

Re: dipole-dipole vs induced dipole

Dipole-dipole interactions occur in polar molecules, while an induced dipole has to do with the uneven distribution of charges, resulting form a shift in electrons.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:38 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Boiling Points
Replies: 9
Views: 55

Re: Boiling Points

I'm confused between the melting point and the boiling point of a compound? Is this referring to the same thing?
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Sat Nov 23, 2019 3:35 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Best Approach to Find IMFs
Replies: 11
Views: 75

Re: Best Approach to Find IMFs

It's good to start off drawing the Lewis Structure. From there you can determine whether the molecule is polar or nonpolar and capable of forming a hydrogen. If a molecule is polar then there is a dipole-dipole interaction. All molecule tend to have a induced-induced interaction.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:44 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Calculating Ionization Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 19

Calculating Ionization Energy

In my discussion we did a problem that was essentially the following:
Calculate the ionization energy of RB given that a radiation with the wavelength of 58.4nm produces electrons with a velocity of 240km/s, when it hits RB.

Why do we solve for the work function?
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:38 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Noble Gases
Replies: 10
Views: 30

Re: Noble Gases

The noble gasses do not follow the trends of IE and EA due to their full valence shell which makes them pretty much unreactive.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:35 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 1D.17
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: 1D.17

, so if the l= 1 then the magnetic numbers are -1,0,1
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:30 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: D orbital
Replies: 5
Views: 31

Re: D orbital

If you take a look at the magnetic quantum numbers for the d, they are -2, -1, 0, +1, +2, which are 5 in total. Each orbital is able to hold 2 electrons, therefore the d-orbital can hold a total of 10 electrons.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:25 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Dino Nuggets Problem 8b
Replies: 11
Views: 304

Re: Dino Nuggets Problem 8b

I got that far, as to find the Energy of the ejected electron, but how do I cancel the mol^-1 of the work function to be able to add it to the ?
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:20 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: shrodinger equation
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: shrodinger equation

I was confused about this too, since he went over it really quick. The textbook provides a bit more information on it.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:18 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Accessing the E-textbook [ENDORSED]
Replies: 20
Views: 1090

Re: Accessing the E-textbook [ENDORSED]

The sampling isn't mandatory but it is highly recommended as it provides you with extra practice and questions that are useful to study for the exams.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:16 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: What's the right equation?
Replies: 7
Views: 49

Re: What's the right equation?

I was confused about this too, but its the first equation with the 4pi.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:07 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Electromagnetic Spectrum
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Electromagnetic Spectrum

I don't believe we have to know what frequencies correspond to what, but i do think it's good to be familiar with the visible light spectrum. This questions was more based on vaguely knowing the Balmer and Lymen series.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:04 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: Info for Midterm
Replies: 7
Views: 117

Re: Info for Midterm

No this will not be tested, since it was just briefly mentioned.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Nov 01, 2019 1:01 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Dino Nuggets Problem 8b
Replies: 11
Views: 304

Dino Nuggets Problem 8b

8. B) A newly designed laser pointer with a certain frequency is pointed at a sodium at a sodium metal surface. An electron is ejected from the metal surface with wavelength 1.10nm. What is the frequency of the light from the laser pointer? The work function of sodium is 150.6 kJmol^1. I understand ...
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:45 pm
Forum: *Particle in a Box
Topic: Particle in A box
Replies: 8
Views: 106

Re: Particle in A box

I think it's something that's meant to be more conceptual and help us understand what we are learning, not really something we have to focus a lot on since we didn't have questions on it.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:42 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: heisenberg, calculating kinetic energy
Replies: 3
Views: 28

Re: heisenberg, calculating kinetic energy

It could be due because your velocity is not squared.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:38 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 17
Views: 95

Re: De Broglie's Equation

A photon does not have mass which is required for the de Broglie's equation where
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:34 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: HW 1B. 7
Replies: 6
Views: 99

Re: HW 1B. 7

The new formula is derived from solving for the frequency in which gives you . You can then plug in this new value of into E=h to get
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:28 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Unit for Wavelength
Replies: 34
Views: 160

Re: Unit for Wavelength

Wavelength is measured in meters or other prefixes of meters such as nano and pico. It's easy to remember that units should cancel, c=λν which essentially is (m/s)=m x s^(-1)
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Clarification on Frequency
Replies: 8
Views: 86

Re: Clarification on Frequency

Increasing the intensity of light will not change the frequency of a wave, it will only change the amplitude of the wave.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:50 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Test Equation Sheets
Replies: 5
Views: 51

Re: Test Equation Sheets

An equation sheet will be provided during every test, so i don't think you have to worry much about memorizing the equations but more about how to apply them.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:47 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Electromagnetic Spectrum
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: Electromagnetic Spectrum

I don't believe we have to memorize the exact ranges, but possibly their placement based on wavelength. I do think you should know the range of visible light because it is common.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:44 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Theoretical vs. Actual Yield
Replies: 38
Views: 451

Re: Theoretical vs. Actual Yield

The actual yield is less than the theoretical yield due to impurities and side reactants. I don't believe it's a concept you'll have to justify in the lab. You just need to familiarize yourself with it.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:39 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: How to express answers
Replies: 13
Views: 166

Re: How to express answers

I'm still a little confused as to when I should use scientific notation or not. For example, the textbook solution for Fundamentals E.23 part a is 0.0134 mol Cu^2+, while the solution for E.23 part b is 8.74x10^-3. Why did they decide not to use scientific notation for part a? I've noticed that sci...
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:37 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: General Limiting Reactant Question
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: General Limiting Reactant Question

When there is only one reactant in an equation, there is no limiting reactant. When calculating the limiting reactant of a reaction with multiple reactants, you need to use mass and molar mass. Then you find the theoretical/maximum yield.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:32 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Units in Answer
Replies: 18
Views: 174

Re: Units in Answer

The question usually specifies which unit is preferred in the answer. If there is a certain question you are referencing, try posting it verbatim, in order to clear up the confusion.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:28 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Module: Molarity and Dilution of a solution
Replies: 2
Views: 39

Re: Module: Molarity and Dilution of a solution

This question requires the M1V1=M2V2 as it is a dilution problem. The 5.00g is necessary to find the moles of KMnO4. From there, you can calculate the M1, divide your answer by .15L (after unit conversion of mL). The 20.00mL or .02000L is your V1, with the new volume 250mL or .250L as your V2
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:17 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamentals G5
Replies: 3
Views: 63

Re: Fundamentals G5

I was confused on that question too, but you have to make sure to do a unit conversion of mmol to mol and to use the M=n/v. This question also required the use of the ratio of Na:Na2CO3, which is 2:1 and CO3:Na2CO3, 1:1.
by ValerieChavarin 4F
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:11 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Why do we always need grams when solving a problem?
Replies: 6
Views: 62

Re: Why do we always need grams when solving a problem?

The unit conversion is necessary for dimensional analysis. In a calculation that requires the use of a molecule's molecular weight, we cannot simply go from mg to moles. The mg nor the g would cancel out.

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