Search found 72 matches

by gabbymaraziti
Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:02 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Enthalpy is said to be additive
Replies: 10
Views: 30

Re: Enthalpy is said to be additive

Enthalpy is additive because it is a state function, meaning it can be added or subtracted.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Jan 26, 2020 9:01 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heat v Enthalpy
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Re: Heat v Enthalpy

Enthalpy is a state function that keeps tract of the losses of energy during heat transfer. Heat itself, however, like work, is not a state function because it depends on the path used to go from the initial to the final state.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:58 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Phase Changes
Replies: 7
Views: 23

Re: Phase Changes

You should calculate the enthalpy, then add the enthalpy of the phase change.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Jan 26, 2020 8:45 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Why does steam cause burns?
Replies: 20
Views: 64

Re: Why does steam cause burns?

The steam has much higher enthalpy than the liquid, because more heat is required to achieve a gaseous state. Therefore, when it comes into contact with your skin and quickly condenses, it releases a large amount of heat in comparison to that that would be released by the liquid state.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:47 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Reading?
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Reading?

What order did Prof. Lavelle recommend we read the textbook in, since he said he was going out of order for the Thermochemistry outline?
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Jan 18, 2020 9:18 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: 5.39
Replies: 1
Views: 10

5.39

5.39 part b asks us to find the new equilibrium concentrations of two gases when the volume of the flask they are contained in is reduced by half. The original concentration of one of the gases was 0.020 M. The solutions manual immediately finds that the new concentration of this gas is 0.040 M. How...
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:23 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kc & Kp
Replies: 12
Views: 34

Re: Kc & Kp

Can we just use K and not specify Kc or Kp? Or would we be marked down?
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:20 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: PV=nRT equation manipulation
Replies: 13
Views: 73

Re: PV=nRT equation manipulation

Manipulating the PV=nRT is helpful because P gives the partial pressure of gases, which we can use when the problem provides us only with molar concentrations.
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:17 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Partial Pressure
Replies: 19
Views: 48

Re: Partial Pressure

How can we convert between atm and bars? The examples in the book show that the conversion is not 1:1.
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 17, 2020 3:11 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Inert Gas does not change pressure?
Replies: 7
Views: 29

Re: Inert Gas does not change pressure?

Do you have to change the volume in order to change the pressure? Or would adding a non-inert gas affect pressure as well?
by gabbymaraziti
Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:10 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Self Test 5I.3b
Replies: 4
Views: 14

Self Test 5I.3b

I'm not sure how to start the calculations for Self Test 5I.3b. Can anyone explain how to begin? Hydrogen chloride gas is added to a reaction vessel containing solid iodine until its partial pressure reaches 0.012 bar. At the temperature of the experiment, K = 3.5 x 10^-32 for 2HCl(g) + I2(s) -> 2HI...
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:17 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Understanding Q
Replies: 13
Views: 61

Re: Understanding Q

I believe we would omit pure solids and liquids because Q is calculated in the same way as K.
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:16 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Solving for K (coefficients)
Replies: 11
Views: 37

Re: Solving for K (coefficients)

The reactants/products don't have to be in a specific order in the calculation of K itself, but the stoichiometric coefficients should be assigned to their respective reactant/product.
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:15 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: What is the Importance of homogeneous vs heterogeneous equilibria [ENDORSED]
Replies: 12
Views: 73

Re: What is the Importance of homogeneous vs heterogeneous equilibria [ENDORSED]

I believe it is important so that we use the correct state when calculated K (using brackets for aqueous reactants/products, P for gaseous reactants/products, and knowing not to include pure solids and liquids in the calculation).
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:13 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: K
Replies: 10
Views: 49

Re: K

Kc and Kp are the same, they are just used for reactions in different states.
by gabbymaraziti
Fri Jan 10, 2020 11:12 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Difference between K and Q
Replies: 9
Views: 30

Re: Difference between K and Q

Q can be taken at any point in a reaction while K is taken when the reaction has reached equilibrium. If K = Q, then the reaction was in equilibrium at the time Q was taken. K and Q can be compared to each other in order to determine if the forward or reverse reaction is favored.
by gabbymaraziti
Thu Dec 05, 2019 5:10 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Ammine vs. Amine
Replies: 1
Views: 20

Ammine vs. Amine

When are we supposed to use ammine, and when should we use amine?

For example, ethylenediamine (en) uses amine and has NH2 groups, but the ligand HN3 is called ammine. What is the reasoning? What about NH4+?
by gabbymaraziti
Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:29 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand Names
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Ligand Names

Are the ligands on the test (that we are expected to know) limited to the ligand table Prof. Lavelle created (named Ligand Names in Coordination Compounds)? Or are we expected to be able to recall more?
by gabbymaraziti
Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:11 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Naming Compounds

I was hoping these wouldn't be on the final... but I'd like to know the answer as well.
by gabbymaraziti
Wed Dec 04, 2019 11:10 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 1E.5 part d
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Re: 1E.5 part d

The more electron shielding an electron has, the lower the Zeff it experiences. Because the 1s orbital has more density near the nucleus than the 1p orbital, it is said to shield the 1p orbital from the full effective charge of the nucleus, Zeff. Key misunderstanding here is that the s and p orbital...
by gabbymaraziti
Wed Dec 04, 2019 10:58 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Stronger acid?
Replies: 9
Views: 79

Re: Stronger acid?

HCLO2 would be the stronger acid, because the greater the # of oxygen atoms attached to the central atom, the stronger the acid.
by gabbymaraziti
Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:14 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: K constant and pK value
Replies: 3
Views: 19

K constant and pK value

Do we need to know how to calculate the Ka, acid dissociation constant, and Kb, the base dissociation constant? Or are these the same as the K constant itself?

Also, is Kw within our scope?
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:34 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: acid v. base?
Replies: 16
Views: 71

Re: acid v. base?

The Lewis structure of a Lewis acid typically has a positive charge, making them capable and likely to accept an electron pair. Lewis bases typically have a lone pair available to donate.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:28 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: NH3, acid or base?
Replies: 12
Views: 552

Re: NH3, acid or base?

Ammonia is considered a Bronsted base because it loses its lone pair and accepts a proton to become NH4+.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:20 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: pH scale
Replies: 12
Views: 59

Re: pH scale

pH cannot be negative, which is why the formula for calculating pH is -log(H3O+).
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:15 pm
Forum: Industrial Examples
Topic: Biological examples of co-ordination compounds
Replies: 3
Views: 44

Re: Biological examples of co-ordination compounds

Prof. Lavelle did spend a significant amount of time on cisplatin, so I think we should understand that and the distinction between cis and trans.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Dec 01, 2019 5:10 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: How to Know the Charge of Ions
Replies: 7
Views: 46

How to Know the Charge of Ions

How are we expected to know the charge of ions quickly (SO4 2-, CO3 2-)? Are we going to be given the ligand table shared by Prof. Lavelle on the final?

If not, what is the method for accurately determining the charge of an ion?
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:50 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: How to Find Sigma Bonds and Pi Bonds
Replies: 15
Views: 103

Re: How to Find Sigma Bonds and Pi Bonds

The Lewis structure shows you how many single/double/triple bonds there are.
Single bond = 1 sigma bond
Double bond = 1 sigma bond + 1 pi bond
Triple bond = 1 sigma bond + 2 pi bonds
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:47 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization Notation
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: Hybridization Notation

It should be written sp^3d.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:46 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted Acids vs Lewis acids
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Bronsted Acids vs Lewis acids

I think they're two different acid-base theories; the difference is that a Lewis theory states that an acid is an electron acceptor and a base is an electron donor, and the Bronsted theory states that an acid is a proton donor and a base is a proton acceptor.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:37 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordinate covalent bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 15

Re: Coordinate covalent bonds

I think the difference is that in a covalent bond, both atoms contribute electrons to the bond, but in a coordinate covalent bond, both electrons of the bond are donated from one of the atoms.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 23, 2019 9:36 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming order
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Naming order

The ligands should be ordered alphabetically
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:04 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet expansion
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: Octet expansion

Elements in the p-block of the 3rd period or lower can have expanded octets. I don't think we've learned the maximum amount of electrons they can hold.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:02 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: single, double, and triple bonds
Replies: 6
Views: 42

Re: single, double, and triple bonds

Regardless of how many electrons are held within the bond, they all act as a single unit because they all lie in the same region.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 17, 2019 6:00 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Memorizing Conversions
Replies: 23
Views: 222

Re: Memorizing Conversions

The constants and equations sheet is on the class website, and that's the same one given for the midterm and final. You should check it out, and if there's anything that is not on there, you should memorize it.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:56 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Grading
Replies: 7
Views: 69

Re: Grading

Lavelle uses the class average at the end of the quarter to assign final grades.. I'd like to know an approximate of what an A would be though, percentage wise.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 17, 2019 5:54 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Calculating formal charge
Replies: 8
Views: 45

Re: Calculating formal charge

You should just calculate the formal charges of all the atoms, and use all of them to determine whether or not you need to change the structure (bonds/lone pairs).
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:59 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Can polar molecules be more polar than another?
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: Can polar molecules be more polar than another?

Yes, some polar molecules can be more polar than another. This is related to the molecule's differences in electronegativity as well as their symmetry.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:55 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Boiling Point
Replies: 11
Views: 64

Re: Boiling Point

Boiling points relate to dipole-dipole interactions because as the strength of these interactions increases, more energy is required to separate the molecules, leading to a proportional increase in boiling point.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:53 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Ionization energy of O vs N
Replies: 6
Views: 32

Re: Ionization energy of O vs N

It's easier understand this if you look at it visually, by drawing out the p-orbitals for each atom. N has one electron in each p-orbital, and O has one electron in 2 of the orbitals, and two electrons in one of the orbitals. N's electron configuration is more stable because its orbitals are half-fi...
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:45 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: General principles of octet exception
Replies: 7
Views: 39

Re: General principles of octet exception

When a central atom has empty d-orbitals close in energy to valence orbitals, it can accommodate an expanded octet. Basically, atoms in the p-block of period 3+ can accommodate an expanded octet, but the size of the central atom also matters. It has to be physically capable of forming bonds to more ...
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Nov 10, 2019 1:43 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Homework from Outline 3 due?
Replies: 5
Views: 57

Re: Homework from Outline 3 due?

I'd think the homework should be from Outline 3, considering the midterm only covered through 2D, and we haven't even really covered much of 2F or 2E yet.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:51 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: ionic vs. covalent
Replies: 7
Views: 45

Re: ionic vs. covalent

When drawing our Lewis structures, is it necessary to indicate if bonds are covalent or ionic?
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:45 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Visual structure of resonance structure
Replies: 3
Views: 34

Re: Visual structure of resonance structure

The electrons are not divided! Resonance just means that there are multiple possibilities for how the electrons are distributed around the structure.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:43 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structures
Replies: 9
Views: 52

Re: Lewis Structures

I think we're supposed to draw the one that is the most stable, i.e. lowest formal charges for each atom (I think that's what you're referring to by 'lowest energy').
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:42 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Midterm
Replies: 28
Views: 183

Re: Midterm

The midterm will include outlines 1 and 2, and most of the curriculum from outline 3. It stops where the Friday lecture ended.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:41 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Filling of Orbitals
Replies: 2
Views: 16

Filling of Orbitals

Why is the d-orbital filled before the s-orbital is filled for some atoms? For example, the electron configuration for Silver is [KR] 4d^10 5s^1. Why is the electron configuration not [KR] 4d^9 5s^2?
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:47 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: p-orbitals
Replies: 11
Views: 40

Re: p-orbitals

You should use the simplified form unless specified otherwise (i.e. if the question wants to know which orbitals are occupied).
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:31 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Cations
Replies: 8
Views: 33

Re: Cations

Cations are smaller than their parents atoms because they have less electrons. Similarly, anions are larger than their parent atoms, because they have more electrons.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:28 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge and Lone Pairs
Replies: 4
Views: 19

Re: Formal Charge and Lone Pairs

You count the number of bonded electrons, not the number of pairs.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:16 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Study Guides
Replies: 6
Views: 71

Re: Study Guides

If you purchased the textbook bundle from UCLA, there is a resource called Sapling Learning that is similar to Prof. Lavelle's focus topics, and I believe they have practice problems as well.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 27, 2019 7:13 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electron removal
Replies: 11
Views: 82

Re: Electron removal

Ionization energy decreases as the size of the orbital increases. This is because as the orbital size increases, electrons become farther from the nucleus, and therefore farther from its positive charge, making them easier to remove than core electrons.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:00 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Shared Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 40

Re: Shared Electrons

This has to do with Hund's rule. Basically, if more than 1 orbital in a sub shell is available, you should add electrons with parallel spins to different orbitals before filling up a singular orbital. This configuration has slightly lower energy than that of a paired arrangement because it maximizes...
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:51 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Equations and Constants
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: Equations and Constants

Also, I don't believe the conversions are provided on the tests (all the 10^x formulas).
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:41 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Unit for Wavelength
Replies: 34
Views: 162

Re: Unit for Wavelength

The unit for wavelength is meters... but, we aren't provided the conversions to nanometers, picometers, etc. on tests, so you should memorize the conversions for these.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:37 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Modules
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: Modules

Sapling Learning is a similar kind of resource. You should have access to it if you purchased the textbook bundle through UCLA, and there are some learning objective courses on there.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:31 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Balmer and Lyman series.
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Balmer and Lyman series.

Can someone please explain the significant of the Balmer and Lyman series'? I understand they are both sequences of lines corresponding to atomic transitions, but what is their use in this level of chemistry? Are the series going to be incorporated into questions, or are they provided to increase th...
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:13 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Knowing Which Equation to Use
Replies: 4
Views: 44

Re: Knowing Which Equation to Use

I usually begin by circling the quantities and units given in the problem, and what type of unit I need to find. Then, I just find which equation allows me work between what is given and the unknown.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:10 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: De Broglie's Equation
Replies: 2
Views: 26

Re: De Broglie's Equation

De Broglie's equation is reserved for objects that mass, like electrons, cars, or baseballs. Since light is, by definition, mass-less, De Broglie's equation does not apply. The wavelength of light can be determined given the speed and frequency of the light wave, as wavelength = c/v.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Oct 12, 2019 11:05 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Wavelength and Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: Wavelength and Electrons

Wavelength depends on the speed that the object is moving at. The wavelength of any given electron is not constant.

Wavelength can be determined using the De Broglie equation: h (Planck's constant) / (mass)(velocity) of the given object.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:55 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Equations We’ve Learned So Far
Replies: 11
Views: 97

Re: Equations We’ve Learned So Far

Anyone have any tips for distinguishing between formulas designated for electrons vs those related to light? I'm having trouble keeping all their meanings and uses straight.
by gabbymaraziti
Sat Oct 12, 2019 10:22 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: F.3
Replies: 5
Views: 62

F.3

F.3 a) Write the formula for nitric acid. b) Without doing a calculation, estimate which element in nitric acid occurs with the greatest mass percentage.

Are we expected to be able to derive the formula for nitric acid and other compounds on our own?
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:51 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Understanding how to get whole #s [ENDORSED]
Replies: 18
Views: 156

Re: Understanding how to get whole #s [ENDORSED]

Once you have calculated the moles of each element, you should first divide by the smallest number. If you still don't have integers for your answers, start multiplying through the numbers until you have whole integers.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:45 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Word Problem Efficiency
Replies: 7
Views: 97

Re: Word Problem Efficiency

I have the same problem.. I have no problem solving the problems that are laid out simply, but spend most of my time trying to break down the word problems. Ive tried circling quantities to try to simplify the paragraphs, but it doesn't help too much. If anyone has any other methods for breaking dow...
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:28 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Alternative to Guess and Check?
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: Alternative to Guess and Check?

I usually start balancing equations with the element that occurs alone on either side of the equation. In this example's case, it would be Sulfur. By balancing the isolated element, you can then focus on the more complicated elements and mixed compounds. It usually does include some guessing and che...
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:05 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: When do zeros count?
Replies: 5
Views: 42

Re: When do zeros count?

Why is it that 3000 only has one sig fig, but 3000. has four? What is the significance of the decimal when there are no figures following it?
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:02 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Showing Work for Limiting Reactant Calculations on Tests [ENDORSED]
Replies: 68
Views: 1610

Re: Showing Work for Limiting Reactant Calculations on Tests [ENDORSED]

Do we need to show our work on tests to show how we calculated the correct number of sig figs? Or is our final answer the only thing we are graded on?
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:46 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Finding the volume of stock solution to dilute
Replies: 13
Views: 503

Re: Finding the volume of stock solution to dilute

I'd recommend converting to L before you start your calculations, because the formula for finding molarity is [moles of solute (M)]/[volume of solution (L)]. Either way, you'll have to convert to L before finalizing your answer.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:41 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing Equations
Replies: 5
Views: 507

Re: Balancing Equations

Since all reactants and products are in the gaseous form, the problem is simply asking what the net change in total moles is. So, since the reactants amount to 30 moles of gas, and the products amount to 36 moles of gas, your net number of moles produced is 6. Don't forget to balance the reaction fi...
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:32 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Finding limiting reagent
Replies: 6
Views: 316

Re: Finding limiting reagent

You also need to take into account the ratio of the reactants to each other. For example, if the ratio of two reactants, CO2 and H2O, is anything besides 1:1, you need to determine how much product will be produced by each quantity of reactants, then determine which one is limiting.
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:22 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Balancing Equations [ENDORSED]
Replies: 25
Views: 489

Re: Balancing Equations [ENDORSED]

How are we supposed to know what number to multiply by in order to attain whole integers? Knowing if we need to multiply by 2 or 3 to reach a whole number is easy, but what about when the solution is more complicated?
by gabbymaraziti
Sun Sep 29, 2019 4:13 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 169
Views: 102965

Re: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]

I'm in a similar place - I took a Chemistry course the summer after my sophomore year in high school and I am now a second year. Luckily, Dr. Lavelle is starting this course with a week focused on reviewing high school chemistry topics, and I've heard he's a great teacher. Past that, I think the bes...

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