Search found 54 matches

by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:23 am
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: What specific compounds/ligands do we need to know for the final?
Replies: 7
Views: 182

Re: What specific compounds/ligands do we need to know for the final?

Matt Sanruk 4F wrote:Is cisplatin a chelating ligand or is it a complex compound?


Cisplatin isn't a chelating ligand because there are no polydentate ligands in it
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:02 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding sites
Replies: 8
Views: 84

Re: Hydrogen Bonding sites

Leila_4E wrote:In organic molecules where they don't show the carbon atoms or lone pairs, do we assume that there are lone pairs around Oxygens or hydrogens...?


You would assume that each atom has however many lone pairs it would need for a complete octet
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sat Dec 07, 2019 3:17 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: MARSHMALLOW- FINAL REVIEW SESSION [ENDORSED]
Replies: 111
Views: 5006

Re: MARSHMALLOW- FINAL REVIEW SESSION [ENDORSED]

Nikki Razal 4E wrote:for question 40c, how do you know whether o2 or o3 has the stronger bond and why?


O3 is polar because the dipoles do not cancel out, so there are dipole-dipole intermolecular forces. The resonance due to the double bond also would cause it to have a stronger bond than O2.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:30 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Boiling point
Replies: 4
Views: 136

Re: Boiling point

First, remember to say the strengths of the intermolecular forces between compounds, because it is not the actual intramolecular bonds. Also, NH3 has the greater boiling point, because it actually has hydrogen bonding (remember that you can form hydrogen bonds only on Hydrogens that are bonded to N...
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sat Dec 07, 2019 12:26 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Boiling point
Replies: 4
Views: 136

Boiling point

So I know that the relative strengths for bonds are ionic > hydrogen > dipole-dipole > london dispersion, and as the bonds get stronger, the boiling point gets higher due to more energy required to break the bond. However, factors such as molecular size and surface area are factors that increase boi...
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:57 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: When to Use Formal Charge
Replies: 4
Views: 146

Re: When to Use Formal Charge

Calculating formal charge is useful when trying to draw the most stable structure as possible. The negative formal charge should go on the most electronegative atom.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:55 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Calculating formal charge
Replies: 8
Views: 202

Re: Calculating formal charge

It doesn't matter which order you calculate formal charge in because each atom's formal charge should be counted individually. You don't need to add up the formal charges at the end, but you can compare each atom's formal charge to ensure that you have the most stable possible structure (i.e. as man...
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:54 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Shortcut for Formal Charge
Replies: 14
Views: 482

Re: Shortcut for Formal Charge

I count each Lewis dot and line around the atom to calculate formal charge. For example, on an oxygen atom that is double bonded to something, there would be 2 lines and 4 valence electrons, resulting in a formal charge of 6.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:51 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: SO4
Replies: 3
Views: 138

Re: SO4

Completing octets is typically prioritized over formal charges when drawing Lewis structures.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:50 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Oxidation Number
Replies: 2
Views: 130

Oxidation Number

How do you find/calculate the oxidation number of an atom? Is there an equation or process?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:49 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Valence electrons for expanded octets
Replies: 1
Views: 117

Valence electrons for expanded octets

Is there a limit to how many valence electrons you can add to an atom that has an expanded octet?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:47 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: expanded octet
Replies: 7
Views: 247

Re: expanded octet

Most atoms after P on the periodic table in the d-block can have an expanded octet.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:46 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Why can't Aluminum have an expanded octet?
Replies: 5
Views: 256

Re: Why can't Aluminum have an expanded octet?

Atoms that can have an expanded octet start with P on the periodic table and continue onwards. Aluminum is before P, so it can't have an expanded octet.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:44 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Octet exception
Replies: 13
Views: 451

Re: Octet exception

Atoms in row 3 and below on the periodic table can typically have expanded octets.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:42 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: radicals
Replies: 3
Views: 128

Re: radicals

Electronegative atoms pull more electrons toward them, so the single electron would go on the most electronegative atom. Atoms are generally more electronegative as you move up and toward the right of the periodic table.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:48 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Oxygen
Replies: 9
Views: 279

Re: Oxygen

Oxygen is able to form single, double, or triple bonds depending on the formal charges of an overall structure or the number of electrons needed. Oxygen typically forms double bonds because it allows for a formal charge of 6 with 4 valence electrons.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:45 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Drawing Lewis Structures
Replies: 4
Views: 166

Re: Drawing Lewis Structures

If we are given a molecule with multiple carbons, the structure will not always be in the form of a ring. For example, C4H10 forms a hydrocarbon chain with all the carbon atoms in the center covalently bonded to each other and the hydrogens at the terminal ends. There is no direct central atom beca...
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:44 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Strength of bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 176

Re: Strength of bonds

OH- has a hydrogen bond, which is stronger than the bond of HS-
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:41 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet Rule
Replies: 7
Views: 253

Re: Octet Rule

Elements in period 3 and below on the periodic table can generally have expanded octets.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:37 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Bent or Angular?
Replies: 15
Views: 337

Re: Bent or Angular?

As long as you say either name and know that the bond angle is less than 120, you should be fine!
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:36 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 7
Views: 276

Re: lone pairs

AnayaArnold_3L wrote:Do lone pairs automatically make a molecule nonpolar?


Yes, lone pairs disrupt symmetry, which makes molecules polar.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:34 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: lone pairs
Replies: 7
Views: 276

Re: lone pairs

You would have to consider the total number of electrons, formal charges, the octet rule, and exceptions to the octet rule to know when to add a lone pair.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Ozone lewis structure
Replies: 3
Views: 149

Re: Ozone lewis structure

Ozone would have 18 electrons, so having 2 double bonds (and no lone pairs on the central atom due to the octet rule) would only have 16 electrons.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:30 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 6.5b
Replies: 2
Views: 126

Re: 6.5b

Sulfur is the only central atom in H2SO5, so there are no cis/trans isomers
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:27 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Quantum Help
Replies: 5
Views: 180

Re: Quantum Help

Figure out what variables are given and what variable they are asking you to find. Then choose whichever formula that uses the information given in order to find the unknown variable.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:24 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Early quantum
Replies: 2
Views: 116

Re: Early quantum

You can review midterm problems and homework questions from Chapter 1.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:21 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light as a Wave
Replies: 8
Views: 233

Re: Light as a Wave

Light constantly acts like both a wave and a particle.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:20 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: midterm/final
Replies: 18
Views: 622

Re: midterm/final

Calculations are more common, but there will probably be 2 or 3 conceptual questions. However, most times you have to know concepts in order to know how to calculate.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:16 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs on Tests
Replies: 24
Views: 1099

Re: Sig Figs on Tests

Your answer should have the same number of sig figs as the number with the least amount of significant figures given in the problem.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:14 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Significant Figures w/ Acid and Base Calculations
Replies: 2
Views: 126

Re: Significant Figures w/ Acid and Base Calculations

Only the first number after the 0's would count as the first significant figure.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:13 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Melting points
Replies: 15
Views: 392

Re: Melting points

Double bonds affect bond strength, but it doesn't affect melting point.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:10 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Atom size
Replies: 16
Views: 648

Re: Atom size

As atoms get larger, they become less electronegative because the electron cloud gets farther away from the nucleus.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:07 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding Sites
Replies: 9
Views: 191

Re: Hydrogen Bonding Sites

It is anywhere that has potential to form a hydrogen bond. Essentially, it is any lone pair on an N, O, or F atom.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:35 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization & Sigma and Pi Bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 59

Re: Hybridization & Sigma and Pi Bonds

I tend to think of hybridization in terms of areas of electron density. So you can figure out hybridization by counting the number of sigma bonds and lone pairs.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:33 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: S Character
Replies: 4
Views: 48

Re: S Character

Victor James 4I wrote:so the s-character is a ratio of s orbitals to the other hybridized orbitals?


Yes, it's typically written as a percentage!
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:31 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent Shape
Replies: 29
Views: 730

Re: Bent Shape

It can have 1 or 2 lone pairs. If you look at the shape of a trigonal planar molecule, it looks like the shape of a bent molecule. The difference is that instead of 3 atoms around the central atom, there are 2 atoms and a lone pair around the central atom, making it have a bent shape. The same conce...
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:28 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Linear VSEPR model
Replies: 21
Views: 435

Re: Linear VSEPR model

If it has 0, 3, or 4 lone pairs, the molecular shape will be linear. However, if it has 1 or 2 lone pairs, the molecular shape will be bent.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:25 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent vs linear
Replies: 56
Views: 1125

Re: Bent vs linear

Micah3J wrote:Is there a difference between bent and angular? Or is it just another way of saying the same thing?


These are interchangeable terms for the same shape! They both describe the molecular shape that has a bond angle of <120 degrees.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:24 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bent vs linear
Replies: 56
Views: 1125

Re: Bent vs linear

Bent molecules can have the VSEPR formula AX2E or AX2E2. Linear molecules can have the VSEPR formula AX2, AX2E, or AX2E3. It depends on the number of lone pairs and how the regions of electron density affect the shape of the molecule.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: vsepr formula
Replies: 7
Views: 192

Re: vsepr formula

The VSEPR formula is a way to denote how many central atoms, bonded atoms, and lone-pairs there are on the molecule. It follows the pattern of A n X n E n , where A is the central atom, X is a bonded atom, E is a lone pair, and the subscript n is the number of each. So a molecule with 3 bonded atoms...
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:16 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: T-shape
Replies: 21
Views: 378

Re: T-shape

T-shaped molecules have bond angles of 90 degrees. A molecule is T-shaped if there are 3 molecules around the central atom and 2 lone pairs, or if there are 3 molecules around the central atom and 3 lone pairs.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:13 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Coefficient in front of orbitals
Replies: 2
Views: 48

Re: Coefficient in front of orbitals

Most of the common hybridization combinations have n=2 as the coefficient
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 9:32 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Determining Hybridization
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Determining Hybridization

Is there a way to tell if a molecule is hybridized just by looking at it?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 8:27 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Carbon monoxide
Replies: 1
Views: 108

Carbon monoxide

Why is there a triple bond for CO instead of a double bond?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 8:01 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Delocalized bonnding
Replies: 2
Views: 107

Delocalized bonnding

How do you determine if a molecule exhibits delocalized bonding?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 8:00 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Hydrogen bonding
Replies: 2
Views: 117

Hydrogen bonding

Hydrogen bonds only occur when hydrogen is bonded to N, O, or F, right?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Thu Dec 05, 2019 7:51 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity for Tetrahedral Molecules
Replies: 1
Views: 40

Polarity for Tetrahedral Molecules

When do dipole-dipole moments cancel out for tetrahedral molecules?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:55 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How do I know when to use a double bond?
Replies: 7
Views: 102

How do I know when to use a double bond?

When drawing structures, how do I know when to add a double bond instead of a lone pair around an atom? For example, in H2CO, how do I know to add a double bond between C=O instead of giving O 3 lone pairs?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:34 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Subshell vs. Orbital
Replies: 9
Views: 160

Subshell vs. Orbital

What is the difference between a subshell and an orbital? Are they the same thing?
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:48 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Converting from grams to percentage
Replies: 11
Views: 292

Re: Converting from grams to percentage

If you are given a percentage in a problem, it is easy to imagine that you have a total of 100g. So theoretically, if you have 16% C, you can assume there are 16g C. With the amount in grams, you can convert to moles to find the ratio for empirical formula.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:45 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Theoretical vs. Actual Yield
Replies: 38
Views: 3381

Re: Theoretical vs. Actual Yield

It is common for actual yield to be less than theoretical yield due to human error or device error. Substances can stick to containers, things can be measured incorrectly, etc.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:43 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Test 1 Grading
Replies: 12
Views: 447

Re: Test 1 Grading

Showing all your work will help your chances of getting more points because they grade based on your method and calculations. Even if your final answer is wrong, you can still get partial credit for any work that you did correctly.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:41 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Angstrom's Constant
Replies: 5
Views: 191

Re: Angstrom's Constant

Multiply by 10^n to get to a smaller unit, and divide by 10^n to get to a smaller unit. In simpler terms, you can move the decimal to the right for smaller units or to the left for larger units.
by Kaitlynn Tran 3F
Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:37 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Unit for Avogadro's Number
Replies: 10
Views: 380

Re: Unit for Avogadro's Number

After using Avogadro's number for conversion, your answer will be in atoms, molecules, or formula units depending on the context of the question.

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