Search found 103 matches

by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Mar 14, 2020 11:47 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Writing balanced half reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: Writing balanced half reactions

It depends whether the half-reaction is oxidized or reduced. In oxidized half-reaction, the electrons will be on the right side of the reaction because of the loss of electrons. In reduced half-reaction, the electrons will be on the left side of the reaction because of the gain of electrons.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Mar 14, 2020 11:43 am
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: zero order reactions
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: zero order reactions

Also, zero-order reactants have an exponent of zero, which makes the reactant negligible to the overall rate law.
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:59 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Balancing the redox rxn in an acidic solution
Replies: 5
Views: 28

Re: Balancing the redox rxn in an acidic solution

After separating the redox reactions into two half reactions, you add H2O to balance oxygens in each half reaction, and add H+ to balance hydrogen in each half reaction.
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 2:28 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Activation Energy and the Rate Constant
Replies: 4
Views: 29

Re: Activation Energy and the Rate Constant

a higher activation energy is a lower rate constant because the reaction occurs slower. It is an inverse relationship.
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 2:25 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: salt bridge
Replies: 11
Views: 44

Re: salt bridge

the salt bridge allows the flow of ions between the anode and cathode solutions.
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 2:12 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: Factors Affecting k
Replies: 16
Views: 145

Re: Factors Affecting k

yes k can change, but only due to temperature.
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 2:11 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 5I.29
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: 5I.29

you would use an ICE table for this problem since you have an initial partial pressure and the k value
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 2:08 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: delta U= delta H
Replies: 6
Views: 120

Re: delta U= delta H

under constant volume delta U equals delta H because at constant pressure q equals H and at constant volume no work is being done, so in that case U=q which is U=H in contact pressure and volume.
by Jacob Motawakel
Thu Mar 12, 2020 2:05 pm
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: determining k
Replies: 6
Views: 33

Re: determining k

yes you can use any one trial
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 7:07 pm
Forum: General Rate Laws
Topic: orders
Replies: 6
Views: 63

Re: orders

you use the table to find the order of each reactant. To do this, you have to keep all reactants constant at two different experiments, except for the one you want to calculate. Then compare the quotient of the concentration of the reactant you want to calculate to the quotient of the initial reacti...
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:50 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: Activation Energy vs. Free Energy of Activation
Replies: 3
Views: 32

Re: Activation Energy vs. Free Energy of Activation

Activation energy is the minimum amount of energy needed for the reaction to proceed. Free energy is the difference in energy between reactants and products. Free energy is calculated as products minus reactants, so if the sign of the free energy is negative it is a spontaneous reaction, and if the ...
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:37 pm
Forum: Zero Order Reactions
Topic: 0 order
Replies: 8
Views: 90

Re: 0 order

zero order means k is a constant, and it is not changed by differences on concentration of reactants. The rate law is just equal to k.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:34 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Van’t Hoff Equation
Replies: 11
Views: 164

Re: Van’t Hoff Equation

You can calculate K at different temperatures with the Van't Hoff equation. I don't see how it relates to DeltaG though because the only relation between DeltaG and K is with standard DeltaG, and since Van't Hoff equation doesn't calculate K at standard conditions, you can't use that K in the equati...
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:29 pm
Forum: Arrhenius Equation, Activation Energies, Catalysts
Topic: catalysts in balanced equations
Replies: 6
Views: 29

Re: catalysts in balanced equations

So if the catalyst is not present in the products of the final reaction, does that mean it is fully consumed throughout the overall reaction?
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:26 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: delta g
Replies: 6
Views: 32

Re: delta g

If we are given a chemical reaction formula and have the DeltaG values similar to that of the midterm, then we would use products minus reactants. However, if given entropy or enthalpy, I believe we would be prompted to use the DeltaG = DeltaH - TDeltaS.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:10 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Finding k1 when given two temperatues
Replies: 6
Views: 85

Re: Finding k1 when given two temperatues

T1 and K1 need to correlate, and T2 and K2 need to correlate. The order only matters in regard to changing whether there is a negative sign or not.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:09 pm
Forum: First Order Reactions
Topic: first order rate of consumption
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: first order rate of consumption

Yes, you can use concentration, mass, pressure, or whatever the problem indicates. I'm sure it will be stated in the problem or be able to be inferred which units to use.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 6:07 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Ka Kb
Replies: 11
Views: 93

Re: Ka Kb

Ka is the equilibrium constant for a weak acid dissociating
Kb is the equilibrium constant for a weak base dissociating
pKa = -log[Ka]
pKb = -log[Kb]
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:17 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Balancing redox with h2o
Replies: 9
Views: 102

Re: Balancing redox with h2o

you use h2o to balance the oxygens in your half reactions, then depending whether it is in an acidic or basic solution, you use h+ and oh- to balance the hydrogens in your half reactions. h+ for acidic solution, and oh- for basic solution.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:13 am
Forum: Third Law of Thermodynamics (For a Unique Ground State (W=1): S -> 0 as T -> 0) and Calculations Using Boltzmann Equation for Entropy
Topic: The Third Law
Replies: 3
Views: 58

Re: The Third Law

It is because entropy is the disorder in the universe, so as temperature approaches absolute zero, there is less and less disorder. You can think of it as high temperature is a higher state of disorder since molecules are moving more and moving faster, so low temperature would be slower and less mov...
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:10 am
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: n=2
Replies: 7
Views: 35

Re: n=2

n is the total number of electrons transferred, so when you get your final balanced reaction from the two half cell reactions, whatever number you used to cancel your electrons from the two half cell reactions is the number of electrons transferred.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:07 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Finding pOH of a solution given the pKb of a conjugate acid?
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Finding pOH of a solution given the pKb of a conjugate acid?

Since you already found pH, you can use the equation pOH + pH = 14 to get 14 - pH = pOH and substitute your calculated pH.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:03 am
Forum: Appications of the Nernst Equation (e.g., Concentration Cells, Non-Standard Cell Potentials, Calculating Equilibrium Constants and pH)
Topic: Concentration
Replies: 9
Views: 51

Re: Concentration

you use the nernst equation and make Q = [anode]/[cathode]
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 1:00 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Partial Pressure
Replies: 13
Views: 105

Re: Partial Pressure

because there are less moles on the right side, so as volume decreases, the side with less moles will increase.
by Jacob Motawakel
Tue Mar 10, 2020 12:58 am
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: deltaG at equilibrium
Replies: 8
Views: 132

Re: deltaG at equilibrium

yes because there is no more potential energy for the reaction to move in any direction.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Mar 09, 2020 10:09 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: endothermic reaction
Replies: 5
Views: 72

Re: endothermic reaction

If you add heat to this reaction, the concentration of products will increase since it is an endothermic reaction. I don't think you can add heat to a specific side.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Mar 09, 2020 10:08 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: exothermic reaction
Replies: 4
Views: 60

Re: exothermic reaction

If you add heat to this reaction, the reactants will increase in concentration since it is an exothermic reaction. I don't think you can add heat to a specific side.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Mar 09, 2020 10:07 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Going from pKa to pH
Replies: 10
Views: 145

Re: Going from pKa to pH

You can use pKa to find the concentration of [H+] through an ICE box, then using the [H+] concentration, you can find pH by plugging [H+] into the equation pH=-log[H+]
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:25 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Delta H
Replies: 10
Views: 165

Re: Delta H

You can find delta H either through products minus reactants, or Hess's law, or the Gibbs free energy equation delta G = delta H - T delta S
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Mar 09, 2020 2:17 am
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Cell diagram
Replies: 7
Views: 33

Re: Cell diagram

In a cell diagram, when there is no phase change, you separate with commas, if there is a phase change, you separate with a vertical line, and when changing from anode to cathode you use double vertical lines.
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Mar 04, 2020 12:08 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: 6K.3
Replies: 1
Views: 34

6K.3

Balance each of the following skeletal equations by using oxidation and reduction half-reactions. All the reactions take place in acidic solution. Identify the oxidizing agent and reducing agent in each reaction.

(d) Reaction of chlorine in water:
Cl2(g) > HClO(aq) + Cl2(g)

How do you do part d?
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Feb 28, 2020 2:25 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: When to add H+ or H20
Replies: 19
Views: 169

Re: When to add H+ or H20

You add H20 to balance the number of oxygens in acidic/basic solutions. You add H+ to balance the number of hydrogens in an acidic solution. You add OH- to balance the number of hydrogens in a basic solution.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Feb 28, 2020 2:23 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: How to tell if its being reduced or oxidized
Replies: 15
Views: 109

Re: How to tell if its being reduced or oxidized

To find the charge of Mn, you would first find the charge of oxygen in that compound, which is -2, and then multiply it by the number of oxygen atoms. So for MnO4- the oxygen part of the compound is -2*4, which is -8. Finally, to find the charge of Mn, you set the charge of Mn plus the charge of O4 ...
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:14 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Equilibrium
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: Equilibrium

delta G is zero at equilibrium, but delta H and delta S do not have to be zero at equilibrium.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:06 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Definitions (isochoric/isometric, isothermal, isobaric)
Topic: Isobaric systems
Replies: 16
Views: 179

Re: Isobaric systems

Isobaric means constant pressure, so at constant pressure q=deltaH, w= -PV.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:04 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: adiabatic
Replies: 19
Views: 228

Re: adiabatic

An adiabatic process is when no heat is transferred.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:59 pm
Forum: Van't Hoff Equation
Topic: Equation
Replies: 5
Views: 38

Re: Equation

You can use this equation to find when delta G is closest to delta H, to do this, you would find a reaction with the lowest entropy(delta S)
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:57 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard Enthalpies of Formation
Replies: 10
Views: 66

Re: Standard Enthalpies of Formation

Elements in their standard state have an enthalpy of formation of zero, such as O2 and H2
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:41 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: P1/P2
Replies: 10
Views: 123

Re: P1/P2

Boyle's Law proves that volume and pressure are inversely related.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:36 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Delta H Fusion
Replies: 9
Views: 161

Re: Delta H Fusion

You have to account for phase change. Melting ice goes from solid to liquid, so you have to add the equation for solid: q=mCdeltaT, to the phase change equation from solid to liquid: q=mdeltaH. mass(m) can also be in moles(n).
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:27 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Delta U = 0
Replies: 8
Views: 148

Re: Delta U = 0

delta U is zero at constant temperature
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:15 pm
Forum: Thermodynamic Systems (Open, Closed, Isolated)
Topic: Intensive and Extensive Properties
Replies: 7
Views: 107

Re: Intensive and Extensive Properties

Intensive property does not depend on the amount, extensive property depends on the amount. An example of an intensive property is heat capacity, an example of an extensive property is specific heat capacity.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:08 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Meaning of q=-w
Replies: 14
Views: 217

Re: Meaning of q=-w

When q=-w, internal energy is equal to 0, which indicates constant temperature.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:07 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Negative work
Replies: 14
Views: 186

Re: Negative work

A system's work is negative when that system does work, Work is positive for a system if work is done on that system.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Feb 15, 2020 3:03 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Rules for constant pressure
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: Rules for constant pressure

At constant pressure, Work = Pressure * Volume, q=Enthalpy, and at constant volume work=0 .
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:44 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Entropy Change due to Changes in Temperature
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: Entropy Change due to Changes in Temperature

I believe the temperature would be calculated in Kelvin since that is the standard temperature we have been using.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:07 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Exothermic reaction
Replies: 18
Views: 102

Re: Exothermic reaction

In an exothermic reaction when temp is increased, the reaction shifts towards the reactants, and when temp is decreased, the reaction shifts towards the products.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:01 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Calculating K
Replies: 15
Views: 137

Re: Calculating K

You need balanced equations so you can have the correct coefficients when calculating k. When calculating k the coefficients of the balanced equation become the exponents of the k equation.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:57 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Signs for enthalpy
Replies: 8
Views: 51

Re: Signs for enthalpy

Enthalpies can be negative, indicating an exothermic reaction.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:53 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: delta s
Replies: 5
Views: 38

Re: delta s

Delta s is entropy. Delta h is enthalpy.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Jan 26, 2020 11:52 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: pressure and enthalpy
Replies: 5
Views: 40

Re: pressure and enthalpy

Pressure and enthalpy have a direct relationship, meaning that when pressure increases so does enthalpy.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:44 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: heme group
Replies: 4
Views: 111

Re: heme group

Heme group has Fe in the center, and 4 N atoms binded with an additional 2 lone pairs of electrons on the Fe. An oxygen can bind to one of the lone pairs.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 9:51 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Lewis Acids.
Replies: 4
Views: 104

Re: Lewis Acids.

Lewis acids are electron acceptors, so the structure or compound that can accept electrons is a Lewis acid.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:43 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Carbon Dioxide and respiratory acidosis
Replies: 5
Views: 566

Re: Carbon Dioxide and respiratory acidosis

excess carbon dioxide reacts with water to make the acid H2CO3. The production of the acid H2CO3 makes the pH of our blood lower (acidic) which leads to respiratory acidosis.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:41 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: Amphiprotic vs Amphoteric
Replies: 6
Views: 134

Re: Amphiprotic vs Amphoteric

Amphiprotic is more specific in saying that the compound can both donate and accept protons, but amphoteric just means a compound has acidic and basic properties, not the real principle of what it means to be a bronsted acid or base.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:36 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Equilibrium sign
Replies: 4
Views: 205

Re: Equilibrium sign

No, since strong acids and bases are completely dissociated, it is only a one way reaction. Weak acids and bases use the equilibrium sign because the weak acid/base is not completely dissociated, so there are still H+ or OH- ions on the reactant side, as well as some on the products side.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:33 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Respiratory Acidosis
Replies: 3
Views: 87

Re: Respiratory Acidosis

When there is too much CO2 in our bodies, it reacts with H20 and creates an acid H2CO3, which lowers the pH in our blood (acidosis).
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:31 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Best Resonance Structure
Replies: 5
Views: 164

Re: Best Resonance Structure

The best resonance structure is when the central atom has a formal charge closest to 0, that is when the structure is most stable.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:29 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Equilibrium calculations
Replies: 6
Views: 82

Re: Equilibrium calculations

Equilibrium calculation are 14B because they require an ICE box, which Dr. Lavelle explicitly stated we would not have to do on the final.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:27 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Kw
Replies: 2
Views: 84

Re: Kw

Kw is used in the equation Ka*Kb=Kw, and pKa+pKb=pKw and -log[Kw]=pKw
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:25 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: As2O and Bi2O3
Replies: 4
Views: 117

Re: As2O and Bi2O3

Because As and Bi are along the metalloid line. The other ones we need to know are also that Metal oxides are basic, and nonmetal oxides are acidic.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:21 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: boiling point
Replies: 8
Views: 255

Re: boiling point

Stronger intermolecular forces have a higher boiling point. If same IMF, such as LDF, the larger molecule will have a higher boiling point.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:14 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Hemoglobin and Myoglobin
Replies: 4
Views: 106

Re: Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

4 myoglobin make up one hemoglobin. Oxygen binds to myoglobin, and it is transferred in hemoglobin.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:12 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 132

Re: Hydrogen bonds

Hydrogen bonds are a bond between hydrogen and either O,F,N. Potential hydrogen bonding sites are a lone pair on an O,F,N atom binded to an H, or H binded to O,F,N.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:09 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Stronger acid?
Replies: 9
Views: 391

Re: Stronger acid?

HClO2 would be the stronger acid because it has a greater number of oxygen atoms attached to the central atom, making the oxidation number of the central atom greater.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:06 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Cisplatin
Replies: 3
Views: 96

Re: Cisplatin

The Cl atoms in cisplatin bind to the nitrogens with lone pairs on Guanine. Also, remember that cis cisplatin structure binds stronger than trans cisplatin structure.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:50 am
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: HF is a weak acid?
Replies: 8
Views: 89

Re: HF is a weak acid?

HF bond is very small and strong, making it harder to dissociate in water.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:26 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Determining polarity from VSPER
Replies: 4
Views: 117

Re: Determining polarity from VSPER

you can't tell polarity just from the VSEPR formula. You need the VSEPR model to tell the shape.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:23 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light Absorbed/ emitted
Replies: 4
Views: 142

Re: Light Absorbed/ emitted

Light is emitted if there is a quantum drop, and light is absorbed when there is a quantum jump.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:21 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination #
Replies: 6
Views: 67

Re: Coordination #

The coordination number is the number of Ligands attached to the central transition metal
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:20 am
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Amphiprotic vs Amphoteric
Replies: 5
Views: 124

Re: Amphiprotic vs Amphoteric

Amphiprotic means you could either lose a proton or gain a proton, like water. Amphoteric means being able to act as a base and an acid.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:18 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Coulombs equation
Replies: 1
Views: 85

Re: Coulombs equation

the force of attraction between two atoms is the absolute value of the product of the charges of the two atoms divided by the distance from each nucleus squared.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:15 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Determining Shape and Placement of atoms
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: Determining Shape and Placement of atoms

The least electronegative atom is in the middle of the lewis structure, and the other atoms are formed to meet the required number of bonds and lone electron pairs.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:14 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Shape
Replies: 1
Views: 38

Re: Shape

it is octahedral because there are 6 ligands: three NH3 and three Cl
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 1:03 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Bonding Sites
Replies: 1
Views: 52

Re: Bonding Sites

There can be, coordination numbers can be as high as 12
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:49 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Writing formulas for coordination compounds
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Writing formulas for coordination compounds

Yes coordination compounds are always neutral.
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:45 am
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: H2PO4-
Replies: 2
Views: 37

Re: H2PO4-

Because in water it acts as an acid
by Jacob Motawakel
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:39 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR Formulas
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Re: VSEPR Formulas

Yes it is bent, VSEPR is AX2E1
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:56 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen bonds
Replies: 17
Views: 147

Re: Hydrogen bonds

Hydrogen bonds can only form with O, N, and F
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Nov 16, 2019 4:50 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polar vs. Nonpolar
Replies: 12
Views: 135

Re: Polar vs. Nonpolar

In a polar molecule, there is a distinct dipole moment, and in a nonpolar molecule, there is no dipole moment because they cancel out.
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Nov 06, 2019 9:31 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Rydberg equation
Replies: 9
Views: 206

Rydberg equation

Why are we not allowed to use the Rydberg equation frequency = R( 1/n1^2 - 1/n2^2)?
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Nov 06, 2019 9:28 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Quantum numbers
Replies: 12
Views: 265

Quantum numbers

Which quantum number is the angular momentum?
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:16 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configurations
Replies: 3
Views: 54

Re: Electron Configurations

I believe we just need to know how to write out electron configuration, but it would be useful to understand the shapes for conceptual problems.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:14 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: strength of bonding?
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: strength of bonding?

It depends on the resonance structure. For example, if a resonance structure changed from a two double bonds to one single and one triple bond, than the triple bond has an increased strength than the previous double bond.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:11 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: expanded octet?
Replies: 9
Views: 96

Re: expanded octet?

Their valence shells have enough orbitals to accommodate extra electrons.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:02 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Central Atom
Replies: 13
Views: 94

Re: Central Atom

The central atom is the atom with the lowest ionization energy.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Oct 28, 2019 1:01 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 5
Views: 60

Re: Ionization Energy

Ionization energy increases from left to right because the atomic radius decreases from left to right, which results in a stronger pull between electrons and the nucleus.
by Jacob Motawakel
Mon Oct 21, 2019 12:03 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals and Energy Levels
Replies: 2
Views: 43

Re: Orbitals and Energy Levels

within the energy level, the volume of space is called the orbital.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:43 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: memorization
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: memorization

A quick tip for trends is that atomic radius increases as you go down and left, while ionization energy and electronegativity increase as you go up and to the right.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:19 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Lewis Structure
Replies: 5
Views: 85

Re: Lewis Structure

The negative implies that the structure has a negative charge and therefore more electrons. You would have to take this into account when making the Lewis structure by adding the additional electron to the total amount.
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:07 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: The extent of the change in the electrical field
Replies: 2
Views: 55

Re: The extent of the change in the electrical field

The electric field is a force field around a charged particle indicating the direction the electric force would push the particle. So I believe a change in the electric field is either a change in the charge of the particle, or a change on the electric forces around the particle.
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:01 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Meaning of h [ENDORSED]
Replies: 5
Views: 86

Re: Meaning of h [ENDORSED]

The meaning of h is just the change of rate of energy because E=hv, and h is just the slope.
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:58 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave Frequency
Replies: 9
Views: 97

Re: Wave Frequency

According to the wave model, frequency is the amount of energy in a single photon. This is proven in the experiment where increasing intensity of did not remove the electron, but increasing frequency of light did remove the electron. In this experiment it shows that frequency is the energy in a sing...
by Jacob Motawakel
Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:53 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: electrons ejected [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: electrons ejected [ENDORSED]

Yes, the ionization energy is the energy it takes to remove an electron, making it the threshold energy. So the energy of the light has to be equal to or greater than the threshold energy to successfully surpass the threshold energy, and remove the electron.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Oct 05, 2019 5:40 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs in % Yield
Replies: 10
Views: 285

Re: Sig Figs in % Yield

You would round up to 64%
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Oct 05, 2019 5:36 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Accuracy v Precision
Replies: 11
Views: 161

Re: Accuracy v Precision

Accuracy is how close the obtained value is to the correct value. Precision is how close the obtained values are to each other.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Oct 05, 2019 5:34 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: When is Test #1?
Replies: 9
Views: 141

Re: When is Test #1?

Test number 1 is during your discussion this upcoming week, and it covers the fundamentals of chemistry we have been reviewing.
by Jacob Motawakel
Sat Oct 05, 2019 5:28 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Conversions
Replies: 2
Views: 41

Re: Conversions

To convert 2.29 x 10^-4 grams to micrograms, you would have to use the conversion factor of 1 x 10^-6 grams which equals 1 microgram. So by using this conversion, you would do (2.29 x 10^-4 grams) x (1 microgram/1 x 10^-6 grams) = 2.29 x 10^2 micrograms.

Go to advanced search