Search found 55 matches

by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Nov 24, 2020 6:11 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Week 8 Participation Points
Replies: 6
Views: 25

Re: Week 8 Participation Points

I believe it's the same this week.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Nov 24, 2020 6:04 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Molecular Formula and Empirical Formula Mass
Replies: 6
Views: 23

Re: Molecular Formula and Empirical Formula Mass

Yeah, like the others said the empirical formula is the lowest ratio so anything smaller would have to be decimals and not whole numbers which isn't allowed.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Nov 23, 2020 2:49 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sapling #17, Week 7/8
Replies: 7
Views: 36

Re: Sapling #17, Week 7/8

The 60 degree bond is located between the 3 carbons in the triangle that they create.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Nov 23, 2020 2:46 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Delocalized pi bond
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Delocalized pi bond

Yeah like the others said when you have a resonance structure there are delocalized pi bonds present.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:34 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent bonds in respect to boiling point
Replies: 8
Views: 28

Re: Ionic and Covalent bonds in respect to boiling point

I think for the most part molecules with ionic bonds are going to have much higher boiling points because ionic bonds are a lot stronger.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 19, 2020 6:28 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: sapling q 5
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: sapling q 5

I think that question also asks for molecular shape if you scroll down.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 19, 2020 12:00 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Most Electronegative Element
Replies: 5
Views: 25

Re: Most Electronegative Element

I agree with what the others said and I wanted to add that Helium is the element with the highest ionization energy so it does follow the trend for that.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 19, 2020 11:57 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity versus atomic radius
Replies: 8
Views: 31

Re: Electronegativity versus atomic radius

I think it's that elements with smaller atomic radii make shorter/stronger bonds because there is less distance between them?
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 19, 2020 11:56 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: quantum number f
Replies: 5
Views: 27

Re: quantum number f

Yes, the f subshell is part of the 4th shell level but like the person above said, it isn't used until you get to an element in the 6th period.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Nov 18, 2020 1:18 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Periodic Table Trends
Replies: 9
Views: 52

Re: Periodic Table Trends

I just wanted to add that oxygen is an exception to the ionization energy trend because the electron-electron repulsion in the first p orbital makes it easier to lose an electron than nitrogen.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Nov 13, 2020 4:43 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity: O v. Cl
Replies: 3
Views: 12

Re: Electronegativity: O v. Cl

I think that although Cl is a halogen it will have a slightly lower electronegativity than O because it is one period lower. It might be due to the lower amount of electron shielding in O which allows it to have slightly stronger pulling power.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Nov 13, 2020 4:36 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 11
Views: 59

Re: VSEPR

Yup! Like Alen said the VSEPR model shows you if the molecule is symmetrical or asymmetrical and therefore non-polar or polar, respectively.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Nov 13, 2020 4:36 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR
Replies: 11
Views: 59

Re: VSEPR

Yup! Like Alen said the VSEPR model shows you if the molecule is symmetrical or asymmetrical and therefore non-polar or polar, respectively.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Nov 13, 2020 4:34 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizable vs. Polarizability
Replies: 5
Views: 35

Re: Polarizable vs. Polarizability

like the others said, polarizability refers to how easily the electrons in an atom are distorted while polarizing power refers to an atom's ability to distort the electrons in other atoms.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Nov 13, 2020 4:22 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence electrons in d orbital ?
Replies: 3
Views: 15

Re: Valence electrons in d orbital ?

Adding on to that I think the only time when valence electrons might be in the d orbital is when you're talking about the configuration for transition metals.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:57 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 5
Views: 52

Hydrogen Bonding

For there to be a hydrogen bond does a hydrogen atom have to be covalently attached to N,O, or F in one molecule and then have a hydrogen bond with N,O, or F in the other molecule? Or can it be another atom in the other molecule?
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Nov 09, 2020 2:49 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Dipole confusion
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Re: Dipole confusion

A dipole is a bond or molecule with opposite charges. An example would be H20.
The Hydrogen ends are positive and the oxygen is negative. These charges allow for bonding with other molecules and ions.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 05, 2020 2:24 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Formal Charge and Lewis Strucutre
Replies: 7
Views: 48

Re: Formal Charge and Lewis Strucutre

A quick way to do it is just valence electrons - lone pair electrons - bonds
or Formal Charge = Valence — # of dots — # of lines
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Nov 05, 2020 2:21 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: two exceptions ( d orbital)
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Re: two exceptions ( d orbital)

Another way to think of it is that because the half and fully filled d orbitals are more stable, the element really wants to have that configuration and will take 1 electron from the preceding s-orbital in order to do so.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Nov 04, 2020 2:50 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Octet question
Replies: 7
Views: 57

Re: Octet question

Adding on to that, some other atoms that don't have an octet are hydrogen, helium, lithium, and beryllium.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Nov 04, 2020 10:44 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Covalent Bonding with elements in period 3+
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Covalent Bonding with elements in period 3+

Since elements in the third period of the periodic table have the d orbital available, does that mean that they can have up to 18 valence electrons?
Like would sulfur be able to have 9 bonds with other elements?
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Nov 03, 2020 10:14 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Why does d orbital have expanded octet?
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: Why does d orbital have expanded octet?

I'm not entirely sure but I believe it has something to do with the d orbital having 10 electrons.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:55 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration of Silver
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: Electron Configuration of Silver

Hi! So you're correct in that you the 5s orbital would get filled prior to the 4d orbitals. However, silver's electron configuration is an exception similar to copper. The 4d orbital is much more stable with 10 electrons instead of 9 so it takes one of the electrons from the 5s orbital. Hopefully th...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:50 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Sapling HW #30
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: Sapling HW #30

Hi! For this question you need to know that the ions of a certain element still have the same nuclear charge but a different number of valence electrons. Rubidium has 1 valence electron in the 5th shell, Rb - has 2 valence electrons but in the 5th shell, and Rb + has 8 valence electrons but in the 4...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:41 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Which model of light is atomic spectroscopy?
Replies: 8
Views: 54

Re: Which model of light is atomic spectroscopy?

hi! I'm pretty sure it's the particle model since energy is proportional to frequency.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 27, 2020 6:19 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Kinetic Energy vs De Broglie's wavelength equation
Replies: 2
Views: 31

Re: Kinetic Energy vs De Broglie's wavelength equation

Hi! I think in short the answer to your question is that you can't use E=hv for any object with mass. That equation is for a photon which doesn't have any mass while the de broglie equation is for objects with mass and momentum.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 27, 2020 6:16 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: For Ms (spin up, spin down)
Replies: 6
Views: 61

Re: For Ms (spin up, spin down)

I think the main notation for this would just be the up/down arrows in the orbitals.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 26, 2020 9:28 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: 4th quantum number
Replies: 8
Views: 36

Re: 4th quantum number

So I don't think you necessarily will have to determine the fourth quantum number but it just tells you whether the electron is spinning up or spinning down. This also confirms the idea that no two electrons in the same atom have the same four quantum numbers.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:55 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Hydrogen Emission Spectrum
Replies: 3
Views: 42

Re: Hydrogen Emission Spectrum

Hi! So the question you shared asked for you to find the initial n, energy level. Like you said, you're going to need the final energy level. The question gives you the frequency of the light which you can use in the c = (frequency)(wavelength) equation and rearrange it into c/(frequency) = waveleng...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Oct 21, 2020 11:59 am
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Rearranging De Broglie Equation
Replies: 17
Views: 105

Re: Rearranging De Broglie Equation

Hi! So the De Broglie Equation is shown on the formula sheet as (wavelength) = h/p p = momentum which is (mass)(velocity) Therefore, you can rewrite the equation as wavelength = h/(mass)(velocity) If you multiply both sides by velocity and then divide both sides by wavelength you end up with velocit...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Oct 21, 2020 11:54 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Interpreting an Equation
Replies: 1
Views: 26

Re: Interpreting an Equation

Hi! So in short the correct rydberg equation would be the first one. The Rydberg equation tells you the frequency for the energy difference between two energy levels. This equation is derived by taking the energy at the final level and subtracting the energy at the final level. The energy at a speci...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 19, 2020 11:43 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module #28B
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module #28B

Hi, I'm confused why you would use Avogadro's number here and not Planck's constant? Aren't we using E = hv, so wouldn't you just use Planck's constant? Does it matter that it is one mole, I didn't know that influenced this. So the question asks for the energy required to remove one electron from o...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 19, 2020 4:06 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: 1B #15
Replies: 4
Views: 41

Re: 1B #15

Hi! So the energy that part c is referring to is the energy of the photon. Which is calculated by E(photon) - work function = Kinetic energy The work function is given to you in part b. You can find the kinetic energy of the electrons emitted in part a using the equation kinetic energy = 1/2 mass (v...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 19, 2020 10:35 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: How do you calculate the wavelength of an electron without velocity?
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Re: How do you calculate the wavelength of an electron without velocity?

Adding on to to this, if the wavelength of an electron was given but not the velocity, you could still use De Broglie's equation to calculate the velocity since the mass of an electron is known.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 19, 2020 10:32 am
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Measurable Wavelike Properties
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: Measurable Wavelike Properties

Hi! So Dr. Lavelle mentioned that if an object's wavelength is too small then there wouldn't be any way of measuring it. He said that a picometer is measurable while a 0.1 kg baseball's wavelength (1.9 x 10^-34 m) is undetectable. Therefore, the point where it is no longer measurable is somewhere w...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 19, 2020 10:22 am
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Measurable Wavelike Properties
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Re: Measurable Wavelike Properties

Hi! So Dr. Lavelle mentioned that if an object's wavelength is too small then there wouldn't be any way of measuring it. He said that a picometer is measurable while a 0.1 kg baseball's wavelength (1.9 x 10^-34 m) is undetectable. Therefore, the point where it is no longer measurable is somewhere wi...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:50 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy levels
Replies: 8
Views: 50

Re: Energy levels

Hi!

So I believe that this is because it takes less energy to excite the electron as it moves up an energy level. The energy it takes to excite an electron in the ground state is much higher.

Hopefully that helps!
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:46 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Atomic Spectra Module Question
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Atomic Spectra Module Question

Hi! So normally these questions will tell you the wavelength of the light emitted. If the wavelength is between 400nm and 700nm then that is known as visible light. The wavelengths emitted in this range are known as part of the Balmer Series. Shorter than 400nm is in the ultraviolet region, Lyman Se...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Sun Oct 18, 2020 10:31 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module #28B
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module #28B

Hi! So the work function actually tells you how much energy is required to remove one electron from a metal. So in this question they give you the work function except it is in kJ per mol. The units of the work function that you want is in J per photon. Therefore for this question you just want to c...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Oct 16, 2020 11:56 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: In class question
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Re: In class question

Hey Norah! Yes the equation you have listed would work fine as well! Knowing that E=h*frequency, both sides of the original equation are practically divided by Planck's constant, or h. Dividing by h on the left side gives you (delta)E/h, which results in the frequency. And dividing h out of the rig...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Oct 14, 2020 6:00 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: atomic spectrum fun
Replies: 4
Views: 53

Re: atomic spectrum fun

The negative sign just shows that energy is being emitted from the excited electron. I think you would change the sign once you have calculated E which will make sure that your frequency is positive as well.
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Oct 14, 2020 4:51 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Excess energy
Replies: 20
Views: 102

Re: Excess energy

calculating the kinetic energy of the electrons
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Oct 14, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: Photoelectric Effect

I'll give it a go! Originally, the goal was to determine how much energy was required to remove electrons from different metals. The model was set up with a light source shining down on a metal with a detector to detect the electrons on the other side. They tried to do this by increasing light inten...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 13, 2020 11:50 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Light Intensity
Replies: 5
Views: 41

Re: Light Intensity

My understanding is that light intensity is simply how bright a light is, and increasing the intensity increases the amount of photons being emitted by that light source. The wavelength and frequency are independent of the amplitude, and are instead dependent on the length of a wave. So changing th...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 13, 2020 11:47 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Light Intensity
Replies: 5
Views: 41

Re: Light Intensity

But how did they increase the light intensity? Did they just increase the number photons? How did they do that?
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 13, 2020 11:40 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Light Intensity
Replies: 5
Views: 41

Light Intensity

After watching the lecture, I understand that the frequency is used to calculate the energy of the photons and not the light intensity. However, I am still unsure about how the light intensity was manipulated in the original experiment. If light intensity correlates to the amplitude of a wave does t...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Oct 08, 2020 12:53 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Fundamental F.28
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Fundamental F.28

Okay sweet! Yeah I wasn't expecting to see a question like that but I'm glad I know how to do it now. Thank you!
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Thu Oct 08, 2020 12:45 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Fundamental F.28
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Fundamental F.28

We went over F.27 in our discussion section so I tried F.28 because it is very similar. The question reads F. 28 A mixture of KBR and K2S of mass 6.14 g contains 2.50 g of potassium. What is the percentage by mass of KBr in the mixture? I ended up getting 79.35% KBr if anyone would like to verify th...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Wed Oct 07, 2020 12:56 am
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Rusty on High School Chem [ENDORSED]
Replies: 200
Views: 141236

Re: Regarding sig figs [ENDORSED]

Hello everyone. I was wondering how strict Dr. Lavelle is regarding sig figs and which value in a question do we use to base the rest of our sig figs on. Also, if we round our answers throughout the problem and get an answer very similar to the correct one in the end, will we still be given full cr...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Tue Oct 06, 2020 7:24 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Grams to Moles of Oxygen Gas
Replies: 7
Views: 48

Re: Grams to Moles of Oxygen Gas

Like everyone else said you would be using 32g.mol^-1 since there are 2 Oxygen atoms in O2. Additionally, if the question asked to use H4 instead of O2 you would be using 4.032g.mol^-1 or (1.008g.mol^-1)(4) since there are 4 hydrogen atoms.

Hopefully that helps :)
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 05, 2020 6:08 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs
Replies: 11
Views: 92

Re: Sig Figs

Another way to write it would be 3.204 x 10^-3 which is also 4 sig figs if that helps you to visualize it.

Hope that helps! :)
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 05, 2020 6:04 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Sapling Link not working
Replies: 2
Views: 40

Re: Sapling Link not working

Hi! I was getting this same error and I think I can help. If you're on your computer make sure to have pop-up windows allowed and then you can reload the page that says, "You must sign up for this through your instructor's course on your University's learning management system" and it shou...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Mon Oct 05, 2020 4:34 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Figs for elements on Periodic table
Replies: 14
Views: 117

Re: Sig Figs for elements on Periodic table

For me, when the question uses common elements such as oxygen, carbon, or hydrogen I use 16,12.01, and 1.008 (g.mol^-1) respectively, but if the question uses elements that I have to look up on the periodic table I just use the exact values and round to the correct sig-figs at the end. Hopefully tha...
by Jordan Tatang 3L
Fri Oct 02, 2020 11:18 am
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Mass Percent for Empirical and Molecular Formulas [ENDORSED]
Replies: 9
Views: 290

Re: Mass Percent for Empirical and Molecular Formulas [ENDORSED]

If the grams of each element in the sample is given, then you can use those values to find the number of moles without having to calculate the mass percent. However, if the question asks for the mass percent or it only provides you with the mass percent and not any mass measurements, then you can us...

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