Search found 62 matches

by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 2:07 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Ka x Kb
Replies: 11
Views: 33

Re: Ka x Kb

Yes, Kw is a constant.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 1:59 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Bars to atm [ENDORSED]
Replies: 31
Views: 162

Re: Bars to atm [ENDORSED]

There is such a small difference between each unit that it is ok to make 1 bar equal to 1 atm.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 1:56 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Gas constant R
Replies: 26
Views: 97

Re: Gas constant R

You must choose the appropriate R value by looking at the units. Each R value is provided on the equations sheet.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 1:54 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kc vs. Kp
Replies: 14
Views: 40

Re: Kc vs. Kp

Yes, they are calculated the same way. You do not need to convert unless it is requested.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 1:52 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Inverse Kc
Replies: 28
Views: 59

Re: Inverse Kc

You would use it when you want the Kc of the reverse reaction.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 1:06 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: T variable in pv=nrt [ENDORSED]
Replies: 38
Views: 278

Re: T variable in pv=nrt [ENDORSED]

You should stick with Kelvin as the unit of temperature in this equation.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 1:04 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kc vs Kp
Replies: 109
Views: 913

Re: Kc vs Kp

If you are using concentrations, then use Kc. If you are using pressures, then use Kp.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 1:00 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: reversing reactions
Replies: 80
Views: 387

Re: reversing reactions

K will simply become the inverse of the reaction.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 12:59 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Units of Temperature
Replies: 82
Views: 287

Re: Units of Temperature

You should use Kelvin for the Ideal Gas Law and other temperature equations.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Jan 05, 2021 8:47 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Textbook Problem 5I.25
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Textbook Problem 5I.25

Hi! I'm not sure about this, but I think the answer sheet specifically mentions NO2 since it has the largest concentration out of the 4 molecules. Typically, I think you just have to make sure that the root chosen is positive and is not a value greater than any of the initial concentrations. Hope t...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Jan 05, 2021 7:10 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Textbook Problem 5I.25
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Textbook Problem 5I.25

Why is the concentration of NO2 used specifically to determine the root of choice?
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Dec 15, 2020 5:47 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 6
Views: 58

Re: Ligands

Ligands are Lewis bases that donate a lone pair each to form a coordination compound with a transition metal.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Dec 15, 2020 5:43 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Water
Replies: 62
Views: 488

Re: Water

Water can be either an acid or a base. It can accept a proton or donate a proton.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Dec 15, 2020 5:42 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: HCLO4 vs. H3PO4
Replies: 3
Views: 105

Re: HCLO4 vs. H3PO4

I am confused as to why something that is more electronegative would result in the formation of a weaker acid. Would the H+ not be more attracted to Cl- if it is so electronegative, thus making it harder to break away and therefore an overall weaker acid? When there are more than two other atoms in...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Dec 15, 2020 5:39 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: CO2 + H2O
Replies: 7
Views: 59

Re: CO2 + H2O

Yes, carbonic acid will be formed.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Tue Dec 15, 2020 5:37 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: "ferrate"
Replies: 8
Views: 64

Re: "ferrate"

It is the name for iron if its compound has a negative charge.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 8:27 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Tetrahedral vs Square Planar Coordinate Complex
Replies: 8
Views: 65

Re: Tetrahedral vs Square Planar Coordinate Complex

We do not need to know how to identify. The only thing that we must remember is the amount of bonds that are formed.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 8:23 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Sapling Q1
Replies: 20
Views: 186

Re: Sapling Q1

You need to factor the chlorine that is outside of the brackets as well when determining the oxidation number for Cobalt.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 8:19 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: what does (en) mean?
Replies: 23
Views: 157

Re: what does (en) mean?

It is just an abbreviation for ethylenediamine
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 8:18 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Order of Ligands/naming
Replies: 28
Views: 136

Re: Order of Ligands/naming

You would place in alphabetical order then put the TM
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 7:30 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: -ate
Replies: 17
Views: 83

Re: -ate

It is because auqa pentacyanocobaltate has a negative charge. Ate- is applied for TM compounds with negative charges.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:51 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 17
Views: 75

Re: Polarity

If an ion of opposite charge came up to the atom and it was selective towards a side, then the molecule would be polar. If not, then it would be nonpolar.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:48 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Seesaw and T-shapes
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: Seesaw and T-shapes

There are 5 regions of electron density: 4 atoms and 1 lone pair. The axial plane has 90 degree angles and the equatorial plane has 120 degree angles.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:46 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: sigma vs pi bonds
Replies: 33
Views: 185

Re: sigma vs pi bonds

A sigma bond is stronger than a pi bond
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:44 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: see-saw
Replies: 6
Views: 65

Re: see-saw

120 in the equatorial plane, and 90 in the axial plane
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 7:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: H20 Shape
Replies: 17
Views: 102

Re: H20 Shape

The two lone pairs would require more than 90 degrees
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:39 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: double bonding
Replies: 8
Views: 74

Re: double bonding

Bending is typically the result of lone pairs pushing against bonded pairs.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:35 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: H20 Bent Structure
Replies: 14
Views: 107

Re: H20 Bent Structure

The space taken by the two lone pairs results in the hydrogen atoms being pushed downwards.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:32 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shape
Replies: 10
Views: 57

Re: Shape

If there are only two atoms in the bond, it is linear.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:28 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond Angles
Replies: 21
Views: 104

Re: Bond Angles

It must be experimentally determined. However, Lewis structures and models can help approximate.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:24 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: repulsion strength
Replies: 10
Views: 50

Re: repulsion strength

Lone pairs have more freedom and are able to occupy more space compared to bonded electrons.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:43 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Which has more ionic character?
Replies: 11
Views: 84

Re: Which has more ionic character?

The valence electrons would become more loosely held, giving the bond more distortion. This is a covalent character.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:09 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: London Dispersion forces
Replies: 14
Views: 75

Re: London Dispersion forces

Yes, because electrons will have uneven distribution that results in a temporary dipole.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 4:03 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Just to clear it up
Replies: 13
Views: 236

Re: Just to clear it up

Yes, Lewis bases donate their electrons when forming coordinate covalent bonds.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 3:59 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance
Replies: 11
Views: 97

Re: Resonance

Ideally, you would want each atom to have no charge. If there are charges, then you should select the structure that has the least amount. You should also select the structure that has negative charges on the electronegative atoms.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 3:35 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Sulfate
Replies: 8
Views: 29

Re: Sulfate

Sulfur is in the 3rd energy level, which gives it access to the d-orbital. The d-orbital gives room for more electrons.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:04 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Atom in the middle of a lewis structure
Replies: 7
Views: 40

Re: Atom in the middle of a lewis structure

Atoms with lower ionization energy can create more bonds because they have fewer valence electrons.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 4:00 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lone Pairs Question
Replies: 22
Views: 119

Re: Lone Pairs Question

A lone pairs are valence electrons around an atom that are not participating or needed in the particular bond.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 3:58 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Covalent Character
Replies: 7
Views: 48

Re: Covalent Character

Covalent bonds have "ionic character" when it consists of an highly electronegative atom bonded with an atom that is not as electronegative. Electrons will gravitate towards the electronegative atom in the covalent bond more, giving that atom a partial negative charge and giving the other ...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 3:43 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Size of Bonds
Replies: 28
Views: 99

Re: Size of Bonds

The bond with more electrons will result in the positively-charged nuclei of the atoms being pulled in closer because opposites attract.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 3:36 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Salts and molecules
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: Salts and molecules

Yes, a salt is a chemical compound containing an anion and a cation. Molecules are held by covalent bonds.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 31, 2020 1:50 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: p
Replies: 19
Views: 159

Re: p

P represents the momentum of an object. It is calculated by multiplying the mass by the velocity. You should only be applied when an object has those two factors.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 31, 2020 1:46 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: 4s and 3d
Replies: 14
Views: 104

Re: 4s and 3d

The 3d orbital must be filled prior to entering the 4s orbital.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 31, 2020 1:43 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity
Replies: 10
Views: 169

Re: Electronegativity

The closer an atom is to having a complete valence shell (a shell containing either 2 or 8 electrons), the more it will want electrons. This is electronegativity.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 31, 2020 1:29 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: polyatomic species
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Re: polyatomic species

There are 6 valence electrons in sulfur (6e-). There are also 6 valence electrons in oxygen (6e-). In Sulfate, there are 4 oxygen atoms and 1 sulfur atom. If you multiply 4 oxygen atoms by the number of electrons in each, that would equal 24 electrons. If you multiply 1 sulfur atom by the number of ...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 31, 2020 12:44 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 10/30 lecture
Replies: 6
Views: 56

Re: 10/30 lecture

Dr. Lavelle multiplied the number of oxygen atoms by 4 because there are 4 oxygen atoms in sulfate. In ammonium, there are 4 hydrogen atoms and only one nitrogen atom, which is why he multiplied the number of atoms in hydrogen by 4.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 3:44 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Electron Density Distribution
Replies: 8
Views: 62

Re: Electron Density Distribution

The electron density distribution is the probability of finding an electron in a specific space
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 3:30 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Silver Atom
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: Silver Atom

Silver's configuration ends at 4d9. However, when an orbital is not completed or halfway completed, it is typically unstable. In order to stabilize the atom, you would need to take an electron from the 5s orbital (which is ok because it will become 5s1, half of the orbital) and add it to 4d9 to make...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 2:39 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbitals
Replies: 9
Views: 100

Re: Orbitals

Dr. Lavelle was referring to a silver atom in its ground state (5s), the number 5 being the energy level and s referring to the orbital.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 2:35 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: How to calculate the kinetic energy, energy and frequency? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 20
Views: 4580

Re: How to calculate the kinetic energy, energy and frequency? [ENDORSED]

Won't the mass of the electron need to be given in order to solve A) of this problem? This might be kinda obvious, but kinetic energy only applies to electrons right? So whenever we use the equation KE = \frac{1}{2}mv^{2} the m will always represent the mass of an electron? The kinetic energy equat...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 2:30 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Intensity vs. Frequency
Replies: 22
Views: 140

Re: Intensity vs. Frequency

When increasing the intensity of light, the number of photons are increased.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:27 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Work function/Threshold Energy
Replies: 19
Views: 91

Re: Work function/Threshold Energy

The Work Function and the Threshold Energy are the same. The word "work" in this instance refers to energy.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 17, 2020 10:20 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Energy Levels
Replies: 11
Views: 92

Re: Energy Levels

Energy level is dependent on an electron's placement outside of the nucleus. It is based on the distance of the electron orbital from the nucleus of an atom. The higher the energy level, the more distance the electron orbital is.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:40 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Frequency vs. Intensity
Replies: 16
Views: 131

Re: Frequency vs. Intensity

Light intensity is proportional to the number of photons. Light frequency is the number of waves that passes a point within a certain amount of time.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:32 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Wave particle duality
Replies: 4
Views: 20

Re: Wave particle duality

Light absorption, reflection, and diffraction are all examples of light behaving like a wave.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sat Oct 17, 2020 9:25 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: work function
Replies: 15
Views: 142

Re: work function

I would recommend using a calculator. It is important to remember converting between appropriate units when doing so.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Fri Oct 09, 2020 7:50 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: What does mmol stand for?
Replies: 33
Views: 331

Re: What does mmol stand for?

The unit "mmol" is known as a millimole; it is equivalent to 1 mol multiplied by 1000.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Fri Oct 09, 2020 7:44 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Volume vs. Density
Replies: 6
Views: 60

Re: Volume vs. Density

When a property is extensive, it is dependent on quantity. When a property is intensive, then it is not dependent on quantity. Volume is extensive because it is a measure of an object's size. Density is intensive because an increase in a object's size or amount does not directly result in an increas...
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Fri Oct 09, 2020 7:24 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sapling HW #4
Replies: 31
Views: 322

Re: Sapling HW #4

If zeros are trailing without being after a decimal point, then they are not significant figures. Any non-zero number is a significant figure. Zeros between non-zero numbers are significant figures as well.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Fri Oct 09, 2020 7:19 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: How many significant figures are in 7.00 x 10^2?
Replies: 25
Views: 584

Re: How many significant figures are in 7.00 x 10^2?

There are 3 significant figures; 7 is a significant figure because it is a non-zero number, and the 2 zeros are significant figures as well because they trail after a decimal point.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Fri Oct 09, 2020 7:08 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Temperature
Replies: 14
Views: 111

Re: Temperature

Professor Lavelle mentioned that Kelvin (K) would mainly be used in this class.
by Chudi Onyedika 3A
Sun Oct 04, 2020 9:03 am
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Balancing Chemical Reactions [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 325

Re: Balancing Chemical Reactions [ENDORSED]

Since you have balanced Fe, move on to another element. There are clearly less O atoms on the product side. Place a different coefficient by the CO2 and analyze how that changes the total number of C and O atoms on each side. If one side has more atoms than the other side, then place a coefficient o...

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