Search found 41 matches

by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Nov 26, 2020 5:23 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: What determine bond strength?
Replies: 4
Views: 19

Re: What determine bond strength?

Yes, you're completely correct in that size contributes a lot to how strong a bond is. Larger radii means larger distance between nuclei, which creates a bond that is easier to break. Also, bond order is extremely important in determining bond strength. Triple bonds are a lot stronger than double b...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Nov 26, 2020 5:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shape Names
Replies: 31
Views: 118

Re: Shape Names

Yes, the shape is just called bent. Bent can also result from a molecular geometry of 3 regions of electron density, and one lone pair! The bond angles will be different between these two configurations of the bent shape though.
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Nov 26, 2020 4:54 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: What determine bond strength?
Replies: 4
Views: 19

Re: What determine bond strength?

Yes, you're completely correct in that size contributes a lot to how strong a bond is. Larger radii means larger distance between nuclei, which creates a bond that is easier to break. Also, bond order is extremely important in determining bond strength. Triple bonds are a lot stronger than double bo...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Nov 25, 2020 5:55 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization and Resonance Structures
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Hybridization and Resonance Structures

Do all molecules with resonance structures have unhybridized molecules that contribute to delocalization of electrons? In the benzene example in lecture, each C in benzene had 3 hybridized orbitals, but then it had 1 unhybridized p orbital that contributed to its resonance. What exactly is the model...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Nov 25, 2020 5:52 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Delocalized Pi Bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 16

Re: Delocalized Pi Bonds

Hey! I had a pretty similar question myself because it seems like a pretty non-descriptive term. But from my understanding, I think a delocalized pi bond shares electrons across the molecule like in the benzene example Dr. Lavelle showed us in lecture. Thus, the electrons present in the orbitals tha...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Sat Nov 21, 2020 10:07 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Tetrahedral Bond Angle
Replies: 6
Views: 41

Re: Tetrahedral Bond Angle

Yes, I think Dylan is correct! It's important to know the order of increasing distortion between regions of electron density. Lone pair-lone pair > lone-pair-bonded pair > bonded pair-bonded pair. So at least know that trigonal pyramidal has a slightly smaller bond angle than tetrahedral due to the ...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Sat Nov 21, 2020 9:58 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: 2F 19
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: 2F 19

Hey Anil, if the problem is not assigned on the syllabus, then I doubt we need to know it for this class. I checked the syllabus and 2F.19 was not assigned, and neither of those terms are in the required objectives that we need to know, which are outlined on Dr. Lavelle's website. So I'm guessing th...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Sat Nov 21, 2020 9:53 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Study Tips for Final Exam
Replies: 56
Views: 211

Re: Study Tips for Final Exam

Hey! Definitely take advantage of as many workshops and synchronous hours that Dr. Lavelle has created before the final. Like everyone else said, going through homework seems like it'll be super important as well. I suggest reviewing all of the objectives that are on Dr. Lavelle's CHEM 14A website! ...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Nov 18, 2020 2:46 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dissociation Energy and Unpaired Electrons
Replies: 3
Views: 16

Dissociation Energy and Unpaired Electrons

One of the objectives on the outline for Chemical Bonds is "Explain how covalent bond dissociation energy is related to covalent bond multiplicity, atomic radius, and the presence of unpaired electrons." I understand how covalent bond dissociation energy is related to covalent bond multipl...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Mon Nov 16, 2020 2:19 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Identifying Total Charge
Replies: 1
Views: 17

Identifying Total Charge

After doing some problems in the textbook, I noticed that some Lewis Structures with a total charge have only one bracket indicating charge. Why is there only one bracket used instead of two? What does it mean when there is only a bracket on one side? This is seen in the answer solution to 2B.5. Tha...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Fri Nov 13, 2020 10:58 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Test Anxiety
Replies: 62
Views: 229

Re: Test Anxiety

Also, remember to get tons of sleep beforehand! Being well rested is a huge part of being prepared -- which will definitely reduce test anxiety. I like to always wash my face before my exam, because I feel fresh and ready to take on the exam, and it also wakes me up.
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Nov 12, 2020 8:25 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding Clarification
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Hydrogen Bonding Clarification

Hey! So in hydrogen bonding, a hydrogen attached to an electronegative atom creates a hydrogen bond with either an N, O, or F atom in another molecule. Do these atoms (N, O, F) also have to be attached to another atom that is significantly different in electronegativity? So, a hydrogen bond cannot f...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Nov 12, 2020 3:45 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Determining Polarity
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: Determining Polarity

Hey! So not using molecular geometry, one way polarity can be determined is by comparing electronegativities. If there are two atoms in a molecule with a large difference in electronegativity, it is likely to have ionic characteristics and would thus be polar. For example, in a water molecule, H and...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Nov 12, 2020 3:42 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: How to tell
Replies: 6
Views: 54

Re: How to tell

Hey! So just to add on, the first 4 elements on the periodic table are all exceptions to the octet rule. Hydrogen, Helium, Lithium, and Beryllium don't have a p subshell, so they only have 2 orbitals rather than a full 8.
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Mon Nov 09, 2020 5:03 pm
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding vs. Dipole-Dipole Attractions
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Hydrogen Bonding vs. Dipole-Dipole Attractions

Today in lecture, Dr. Lavelle used the interaction between two HF molecules as an example of a dipole-dipole interactions, as the slightly negative Fluorine interacts with the slightly positive Hydrogen. Dr. Lavelle mentioned that on average, these interactions release about -2 KJ/mol. However, isn'...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Nov 04, 2020 11:38 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Are there subshells past f?
Replies: 28
Views: 108

Re: Are there subshells past f?

Also, it's important to note that when it comes to electron configurations, we don't even have to know energy levels past 4p!
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Nov 04, 2020 11:32 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Topic 1F. 6 Problem
Replies: 2
Views: 23

Re: Topic 1F. 6 Problem

Hey! I got Ca, Mg, and Al instead actually. 1) So I believe Ca would have the lower ionization energy because its electrons are much more shielded than Mg, even when two electrons are removed. This is because Ca is a whole energy level higher than Mg (n=4 vs n=3). 2) Mg would have the lower ionizati...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Nov 04, 2020 2:42 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic v. Covalent Bonds`
Replies: 10
Views: 52

Re: Ionic v. Covalent Bonds`

It's also important to note that because metals give up an electron and nonmetals gain an electron during ionic bonding, they gain charges! But in covalent bonding, while there might be shifts in polarity, the atoms involved are not ionized. Some common differences between ionic bonds and covalent b...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Mon Nov 02, 2020 8:53 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Subshells Existing Out of the Periodic Table
Replies: 2
Views: 11

Subshells Existing Out of the Periodic Table

In textbook number 1D.25, the question asks whether it is possible for the subshell 6f to exist. From my understanding, the periodic table only goes up to 5f as a subshell, yet the solutions say that 6f is a possible subshell. So my question is, can subshells that exist past the known elements in a ...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Mon Nov 02, 2020 4:01 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Delocalization of Electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 19

Delocalization of Electrons

So to my understanding, in resonance structures, electrons that form double bonds are delocalized because they exist in multiple locations (equivalent electron density). But does this mean electrons involved in single bonding and lone pairs are not delocalized? Or are they also equally shared among ...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 29, 2020 10:00 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Ionization Energy v. Work Function
Replies: 3
Views: 31

Ionization Energy v. Work Function

After looking through trends in the periodic table in the lecture on 10/28, I came across something I don't quite get. I understand the fundamental difference between the two: ionization energy involves removing the outer-most electron of an atom in a gaseous state, while the work function is the en...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Tue Oct 27, 2020 9:01 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Which model of light is atomic spectroscopy?
Replies: 8
Views: 54

Re: Which model of light is atomic spectroscopy?

Hey, what the others said is completely correct. Just for the sake of clarification, the model of light can be considered as a wave in other experiments, and is even proven by the c = λ ν equation. The equation works for the wave model because as frequency decreases, wavelength increases at an inver...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:51 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic Spectroscopy vs molecular spectroscopy
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: Atomic Spectroscopy vs molecular spectroscopy

Hey! So I had a similar question and after some digging around I think the major difference between atomic and molecular spectroscopy is the energy levels. In multi-electron systems, which are used in molecular spectroscopy, each subshell has a different level of energy due to a combination of elect...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Mon Oct 26, 2020 10:30 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Effective Nuclear Charge
Replies: 1
Views: 19

Effective Nuclear Charge

For multi-electron systems, are we required to know how to calculate the effective nuclear charge for the nucleus? During the lecture on 10/23/2020, Dr. Lavelle said that the nuclear charge of Lithium was 3+, and its effective charge was between 1+ and 3+, but I wasn't entirely sure how that range w...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Mon Oct 26, 2020 8:35 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic Spectroscopy v. Molecular Spectroscopy
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Atomic Spectroscopy v. Molecular Spectroscopy

Going through the learning objectives in the Quantum World outline, I found the following objective: "With respect to electron transitions that give rise to a UV or visible spectrum: understand the difference between electronic transitions in atomic orbitals (atomic spectroscopy) and electronic...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 22, 2020 11:33 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Sapling Hw 2 #20
Replies: 3
Views: 48

Re: Sapling Hw 2 #20

Hey! So ionization just means that the atom has become an ion, or lost/gained electrons and now has a charge. In this case, the ionized form of Oxygen has a charge of -2. This means that oxygen has 2 extra electrons. As a result of the greater number of electrons in its shell, the electrons repulse ...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 22, 2020 11:28 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Schrodinger Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 52

Re: Schrodinger Equation

I'm also confused about the Schrodinger Equation... When Dr. Lavelle says that we operate a change on the wave function, is that operation always a hamiltonian? Because at the bottom of the equation sheet there are a few formulas involving the wave function that I just don't understand... If someone...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 22, 2020 11:22 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Electrons emitting photons
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: Electrons emitting photons

I think that one electron only emits one photon of a given energy level. From my understanding of the photoelectric experiment, one photon can only eject one other electron, because this energy can only be absorbed by a single electron. I would assume this same principle applies as the electron fall...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Tue Oct 20, 2020 11:01 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Sapling Question 29
Replies: 6
Views: 51

Re: Sapling Question 29

Hey! So for the electron, we can find its energy using the kinetic energy formula, E_k = 1/2 * m * v^2. Because the electron is a moving object, its energy is kinetic and can be calculated by knowing its mass and velocity. The mass of an electron is given to us as 9.11x10^-31 kg. The velocity can be...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Tue Oct 20, 2020 10:45 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: How are you studying?
Replies: 196
Views: 845

Re: How are you studying?

Personally, I've been studying mainly through textbook problems, especially because those types of problems will be put on future exams. Additionally, UA workshops are SUPER helpful for additional practice. Even if I can't make it to live sessions, I always try to do the worksheets posted on the sha...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:09 am
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: m vs nm
Replies: 66
Views: 353

Re: m vs nm

All of these replies are correct, but I just want to add on a note to keep in kind. When dealing with equations like (wavelength)(frequency) = c, make sure that wavelength is in meters, as that's the si unit that is used in this calculation. Other than that, yes, your answer can either be in m or nm...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:06 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy Gaps
Replies: 8
Views: 72

Re: Energy Gaps

Hey! Just to add onto the explanations, the energy gaps get progressively smaller because as the electron is further away from the nucleus, there is less of a magnetic force pulling it towards the positively charged center. Because electrons are negatively charged, it is usually very difficult, and ...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Oct 14, 2020 2:22 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: What happens to emitted electrons?
Replies: 1
Views: 33

Re: What happens to emitted electrons?

From my knowledge, the electrons are simply ejected from the metal's surface and actually collide with a detector or some other tool to measure the velocity, ultimately being used in kinetic energy calculations. Looking at diagrams of the experiment, there's a battery that establishes a negative cha...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Oct 14, 2020 2:18 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Kinetic Energy Clarification
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Re: Kinetic Energy Clarification

Hi! So technically, the energy to remove the electron IS the work function. The work function is essentially the threshold energy. And if the kinetic energy of the electron is 0 J, then this work function or threshold energy will be equal to the energy of the photon hitting the surface of the metal....
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Tue Oct 13, 2020 4:52 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Post-Assessment #29 for Atom Spectroscopy
Replies: 3
Views: 27

Post-Assessment #29 for Atom Spectroscopy

Hi, I'm struggling to go about this problem in the post module assessment. In 1.0 s, a 60 W bulb emits 11 J of energy in the form of infrared radiation (heat) of wavelength 1850 nm. What is the energy per photon of light emitted? How many photons of infrared radiation does the lamp generate in 1.0 s...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:51 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Week 1 Sapling Q. 10
Replies: 5
Views: 90

Re: Week 1 Sapling Q. 10

Hey! So finding the molar masses of the reactants and products requires you to actually know a little about how to read line drawings, which are pretty common in organic chemistry. Basically, its just a way to represent carbons and hydrogens. Every "vertex" between the lines represents one...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Textbook Question M.5
Replies: 7
Views: 56

Re: Textbook Question M.5

Could someone explain why you do 5-4 in order to get the moles leftover of the excess reactant? Hey! So you subtract 4 moles from the 5 moles of excess because 4 moles is the amount that reacts with the limiting reactant in the reaction. The 4 is calculated using molar ratios as the person above sa...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:37 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Advice from a Medical Student - Part II [ENDORSED]
Replies: 188
Views: 14308

Re: Advice from a Medical Student - Part II [ENDORSED]

Hi! I really loved your story, and it got me excited for what's to come in medical school, as I'm on the path right now. I still have a long way to go though! I had a question about your undergraduate experience though. Did you pursue any minor or even a double-major? I know for a fact I want to min...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Wed Oct 07, 2020 3:01 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Week 1 Homework #7
Replies: 3
Views: 71

Re: Week 1 Homework #7

From my own understanding of significant figures, they exist to ensure precision rather than accuracy. In this context, it might seem to make less sense to round to three significant figures, but in a laboratory context, when gathering data it becomes important to have a concrete number of significa...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Tue Oct 06, 2020 6:39 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Accuracy vs Precision
Replies: 20
Views: 202

Re: Accuracy vs Precision

With the definitions of accuracy and precision in mind, in what cases or scenarios would it be more useful to determine the accuracy/ precision? Is one more beneficial than the other in general, or does it solely depend on the situation? I think accuracy more often than not trumps precision when it...
by Neel Bonthala 3E
Fri Oct 02, 2020 4:22 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Emprical Formulas Ever Larger than Molecular? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 26
Views: 437

Re: Emprical Formulas Ever Larger than Molecular? [ENDORSED]

I had a quick question regarding this subject. Does anyone know if when the empirical formula is the same as the molecular formula, does it matter which one you call it? Or should you state that it's both at the same time? I believe it makes no difference but I just want to make sure Hey, I'm prett...

Go to advanced search