Search found 65 matches

by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:59 pm
Forum: Heat Capacities, Calorimeters & Calorimetry Calculations
Topic: Temperature and Equilibrium
Replies: 1
Views: 7

Re: Temperature and Equilibrium

I am not 100% sure, but I believe that we have not learned how to calculate K when there is a change in temperature. So for now, all of the chemical equilibrium problems deal with an initial temperature that is the same as the final temperature. If there was a change in temperature, then the equilib...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:56 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Phase Changes
Replies: 6
Views: 14

Re: Phase Changes

When going from liquid to gas, we heated the system and that allows for an increase in enthalpy which ultimately transforms the liquid into its gas phase. Going over the Friday lecture at the end where Dr. Lavelle shows the phase change diagram is a good visual of how the phase changes work.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:54 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Thermochemistry on Midterm 1
Replies: 4
Views: 22

Thermochemistry on Midterm 1

Hello,

Does anyone know what book work problems we should be doing to prepare for midterm 1?

Thank you
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:51 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Steam
Replies: 7
Views: 23

Re: Steam

Since steam is at a different phase of matter than liquid water, once it touches your skin, it will release all energy it holds until it becomes liquid water (this is an exothermic reaction). From the energy diagram he showed us in lecture, you can see how it takes a lot of energy given off for stea...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 24, 2021 2:46 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Box Polynomials
Replies: 9
Views: 30

Re: ICE Box Polynomials

Professor said that if there is ever a situation like that, then x would be small enough to approximate (K < 10^-4). No need to go and practice some crazy trinomial equations and stuff!
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Jan 16, 2021 8:03 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle with Temperature
Replies: 7
Views: 27

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle with Temperature

I believe that you have it switched around. When a reaction is endothermic, adding heat will increase product formation given the reaction can only proceed with the addition of heat/energy. If the reaction is exothermic, I just think of it as the reverse reaction then must be endothermic and therefo...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Jan 16, 2021 7:59 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: When x is negligible in Equilibrium constant
Replies: 34
Views: 100

Re: When x is negligible in Equilibrium constant

It is probably best to assume x is negligible when K is < 10^-4 although. sometimes I hear Professor Lavelle say 10^-3.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Jan 16, 2021 7:56 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: pH of Weak Acids
Replies: 11
Views: 57

Re: pH of Weak Acids

The sapling homework problems could have had very had concentrations of a weak acid and therefore that increases the chance of the weak acid ionizing and lowering the pH of the solution. If you see that a weak acid has a low pH, do not immediately assume you did something wrong!
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Jan 16, 2021 7:54 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Non- water solvent
Replies: 7
Views: 36

Re: Non- water solvent

The solvent is typically denoted in a chemical equation with an (l) beside i, stating that it is a liquid and therefore all other reactants/products simply lie inside that liquid.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Jan 16, 2021 7:52 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Determining Percent Protonation
Replies: 7
Views: 27

Re: Determining Percent Protonation

In terms of solving for percent ionization, the terms protonation and ionization would mean the same thing.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 10, 2021 12:11 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Units for Pressure
Replies: 41
Views: 821

Re: Units for Pressure

I wouldn't think that there would be any situation where we need to convert to Pascals since Lavelle didn't talk about that unit at all. I think its important to just read the question and figure out what units they want their final answer in.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 10, 2021 12:09 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Reading the textbook [ENDORSED]
Replies: 179
Views: 106778

Re: Reading the textbook [ENDORSED]

I feel as if the textbook goes in more detail on all of the topics Lavelle lectures on; however, the information that is provided in lectures or discussions in my opinion is still enough to succeed on the tests. There's really no info in the book that is important that Lavelle didn't talk about eith...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 10, 2021 12:06 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sign of x in ICE Box
Replies: 8
Views: 34

Re: Sign of x in ICE Box

Even for scenarios where you start with some amount of product, the products will always need to gain composition/concentration in order to reach equilibrium. Therefore, the products are always +x and the reactants, since they are giving off their concentration to form products, will always be -x.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 10, 2021 12:04 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Change inn temperature
Replies: 6
Views: 22

Re: Change inn temperature

I believe later on in the course we will learn how to calculate K when temperature changes. Right now, we just need to know if a change in temp. will favor reactants or products.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sun Jan 10, 2021 12:02 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Inert Gas
Replies: 20
Views: 81

Re: Inert Gas

An inert gas is a gas that typically does not react with any other molecules. These are gases in the last column of the periodic table and don't want to give off or gain an electron since their valence shell is already full.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:07 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Favorite TV shows
Replies: 178
Views: 879

Re: Favorite TV shows

If you're a big star wars fan, Star Wars the Clone Wars on Netflix is a must watch!!
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Dec 08, 2020 5:01 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Lone pairs and multiple bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 21

Re: Lone pairs and multiple bonds

I'm not 100% sure, however I do know that the nonhybridized electrons typically are the electrons that are used in the pi bonds and that make molecules more rigid and unable to move around or change their orientation. So maybe there needs to be at least one electron that sits in an atomic orbital ra...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Dec 08, 2020 4:58 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Final Exam
Replies: 11
Views: 115

Re: Final Exam

Not sure, but from the last midterms, a lot of the test questions were exactly the same or at least derived from book problems so to be safe, I would go over as many book problems as possible (that REALLY helped me get through the midterms smoothly as well)
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Dec 08, 2020 4:57 pm
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Which definition?
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: Which definition?

Personally, using the Bronsted Acid-Base definitions are easier for me to visualize given you can see a proton being accepted or donated by looking at the lewis structures; however, not all acids and bases will be able to be defined by the movement of H+ ions (for example, BF3 can act as an acid in ...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Dec 08, 2020 4:54 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: H3O+ versus H+
Replies: 16
Views: 113

Re: H3O+ versus H+

They are the same thing, the only difference is that, experimentally, H30+ is technically more accurate given that is what is happening at a molecular level (the water molecule gains a proton, lowering the pH of the solution rather than just a H+ ion floating around in solution).
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:20 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 9
Views: 100

Re: Electron Affinity

Atoms in the same row increase in electronegativity towards the right because more protons = stronger pull on the e- = higher affinity/ability to attract e-
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:17 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Denticity of CO3^(2-) (#9C.5b)
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Denticity of CO3^(2-) (#9C.5b)

I believe because CO3(2-) has resonance and that can change where the two - formal charge oxygens are. If the single bonded oxygens with a - formal charge are near one another, it can form a bidentate and if they are far apart in the trigonal planar shape, then only one O can bind with a TM and that...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:12 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Iron Naming
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Re: Iron Naming

Instead of Iron they are using the latin name based off of Ferrum (which is why it is called Fe). I'm not sure if there are other exceptions like that one but it's probably not something you have to worry too much about.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Nov 27, 2020 1:52 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Drawing hybridization Aufbau Diagrams
Replies: 1
Views: 24

Drawing hybridization Aufbau Diagrams

I'm a little confused on drawing the aufbau diagrams for hybridized orbitals because I am not sure if we always move one of the electrons to the higher atomic orbital (ex. e- in 2sp3 moves to 2p) to prevent electron repulsion or if we sometimes do this and it depends on circumstances... If someone c...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 8:52 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand bonding
Replies: 1
Views: 37

Ligand bonding

From what Lavelle said in the lecture about how ligands can only form a coordinate bond with one of its lone pairs to a TM, does this mean that ligands cannot form double bonds?
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:11 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization with double bonds
Replies: 4
Views: 30

Re: Hybridization with double bonds

When figuring out hybridization, I try to look specifically to how many atoms or lone pairs are around the central atom rather than looking at the type of bonds for instance. This is because all the bond types (single, double, triple) are treated equally in hybridization.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:07 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Long Pairs/Double & Triple Bonds
Replies: 9
Views: 58

Re: Long Pairs/Double & Triple Bonds

Hybridization treats single, double, triple bonds, and lone pairs all as one region of electron density. Instead of looking for bonds, look for how many atoms and lone pairs are around/bonded to the central atom to figure out its hybridization.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:06 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: NO2 Polarity
Replies: 6
Views: 56

Re: NO2 Polarity

Due to differences in electronegativity between N and O, the bonds in NO2 are polar. However, if NO2 did not have a lone pair, then these polar bonds would cancel each other out in a linear structure. With the lone pair, the bonds are not directly opposite of one another, meaning the dipole moments ...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:03 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sapling Week 7 & 8 HW Question 11
Replies: 14
Views: 108

Re: Sapling Week 7 & 8 HW Question 11

When figuring out hybridization, you only need to count the number of electron densities around the central atom (including lone pairs). there is only one possible s orbital, then 3 possible p orbitals, 5 possible d orbitals, etc.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 7:00 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: H2O VSEPR
Replies: 27
Views: 147

Re: H2O VSEPR

Remember when trying to figure out molecular shape, you only want to consider the amount of atoms present, not the amount of e- densities. So H20 has only two atoms branching from the central atom, making it bent with its lone pairs.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:34 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Which is strongest bond
Replies: 9
Views: 97

Re: Which is strongest bond

The smaller bond will typically be the strongest so in this case the CF4 bond is strongest. I think it is talking about the covalent vs ionic character of the bond where out of all of those options, CF4 has the least covalent character. Their wording was a little confusing.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:31 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: axial and equatorial atoms
Replies: 2
Views: 24

Re: axial and equatorial atoms

When looking at molecules such as the tetrahedral shape or the trigonal bipyramidal, the equatorial atoms are the ones in the same plane versus the axial atoms are the ones that lie above or below that plane. Although it seems that if you rotate the molecule the perspective changes, I think that it ...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:26 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 30
Views: 152

Re: Polarity

When determining polarity, it is important to look at not only the difference in electronegativity but also the shape of the molecule. When there are two or more polar bonds opposite of one another, I have always thought of it as like two people playing tug of war with electrons that have the same a...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:24 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: higher dipole moment sapling #10
Replies: 5
Views: 59

Re: higher dipole moment sapling #10

I believe the question is trying to get you to look at the molecular shapes of each molecule where in answer b, COFH has higher polarity (meaning higher dipole moment) because there is no F on the other side of the molecule to cancel out the electronegativity of the other F. In the other two molecul...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 3:18 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: determining molecular shape
Replies: 10
Views: 78

Re: determining molecular shape

SO2 can have an expanded octate since some of its valence electrons are in the 3d orbital. That means it will have a lone pair to satisfy all the electrons in the molecule. Lone pair makes it polar versus CO2 has only 4 bonds with the two 0xygen molecules, no lone pairs.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 11:31 am
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Finding a dipole moment
Replies: 6
Views: 66

Re: Finding a dipole moment

A dipole moment in a molecule occurs when electrons are unequally shared between atoms. It can technically occur between all atoms in a molecule regardless of polarity. So no it does not determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 11:10 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Dipole- induced dipole bond vs. dipole-dipole bond
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Re: Dipole- induced dipole bond vs. dipole-dipole bond

A dipole-dipole bond and dipole-induced have relatively the same energy in them
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 11:08 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Microwaves
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Re: Microwaves

Going back to the last unit/outline, microwaves have very long wavelengths and low frequency, meaning they do not have high enough energy to excite an electron. The movement of electrons in water molecules however will increase the temperature and produce heat.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 11:04 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Cations and Anions
Replies: 3
Views: 36

Re: Cations and Anions

A logical way to view if an atom is more likely to become an anion or cation is to look at electron affinity trends in the periodic table and ionization energy trends. So yes, metals will mainly be cations and nonmetals anions
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Thu Nov 12, 2020 9:44 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Electron Configuration for Transition Metals
Replies: 3
Views: 19

Electron Configuration for Transition Metals

I am a little confused on what the rules are for electron configuration for some of the transition metals when to break those rules for example in Cu. I know that one of the electrons in the Cu electron configuration is transferred from the 4s orbital to the 3d orbital to make 3d104s1 which is more ...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:16 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Final Jitters
Replies: 226
Views: 35994

Re: Final Jitters

Over time, developing test taking strategies as well as an understanding of what a professor wants during an exam or what he/she focuses on is very helpful. I also believe in the idea of studying very lightly before the final (given you have a solid understanding of everything before).
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:11 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Polyatomics ions
Replies: 4
Views: 17

Re: Polyatomics ions

Remember there is a difference between an ion, an atom with a charge, and an ionic bond, the complete transfer of electrons between two atoms. Because it states there are polyatomic ions does not mean there are ionic bonds. Lewis Structures will be used to show covalent bonds.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:09 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Electron spin
Replies: 12
Views: 47

Re: Electron spin

For electron spin, you do not need to worry about figuring it out if one is upward or downward spin (+1/2 or -1/2). The idea of electron spin as the 4th quantum number shows that there will never be electrons with the same set of quantum numbers, they will always have individual electron configurati...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 10:05 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: How to assign formal charge
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Re: How to assign formal charge

The numerator is the number of shared e- in the hydrogen atom. Remember that one bond contains 2 shared e-, so the one covalent bond between the N. and the H gives you the 2 in the numerator.
Hope that makes sense.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Oct 31, 2020 2:14 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Paired vs Unpaired Electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 61

Paired vs Unpaired Electrons

I am wondering if, when drawing the valence electrons of an atom, if we follow the same principle that we used when writing out electron configuration: Hund's Rule states that due to e- repulsion, e-in the same subshell occupy different orbitals. As in, we would rather have. lone electrons before we...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:58 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Need help with Experiment Conclusions
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Need help with Experiment Conclusions

In the diffraction experiment, the wave-like properties are shown in the constructive and destructive interference of the radiation when they go through the slits in the wall. If light solely acted as a particle, then the light would have only showed up right behind the openings in the wall, yet it ...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:52 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Textbook Problem 1B.9
Replies: 5
Views: 76

Re: Textbook Problem 1B.9

Remember if you ever get stuck on problems that ask for an answer in specific units to go through it step by step through dimensional analysis. There you can see how the J will cancel out and leave you with photons/sec and you can convert photons to moles using Avagrado's number.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:50 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Which model of light is atomic spectroscopy?
Replies: 8
Views: 96

Re: Which model of light is atomic spectroscopy?

Atomic Spectroscopy would support the particle model of light because atoms are only able to absorb a specific set of wavelengths or frequencies given it must match the change in energy between shells like n=1 and n=2. By showing that light is absorbed in only a set wavelength or frequency, it prove...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:46 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Sapling Week 2,3,4 HW #4
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: Sapling Week 2,3,4 HW #4

Just as they described above, you want to solve for the number of photons that the metal absorbed because, given the photoelectric effect and the particle model of light, one photon will only be able to eject one electron. Therefore, solving for the number of photons will result in the same value as...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 27, 2020 8:43 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Concentration Calculations
Replies: 11
Views: 3074

Re: Concentration Calculations

We only know that the molecular formula of sodium carbonate is Na2CO3 by understanding charges in the molecules. CO3 has a -2 charge when by itself and Na has a +1 charge when isolated. Therefore, the formula would be Na2CO3 in order to result in a neutral charge.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Oct 24, 2020 3:44 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Usage of E=hv
Replies: 10
Views: 106

Re: Usage of E=hv

Since electrons have a mass, using E=hv to calculate the energy of an electron would be incorrect. As everyone else has said, use DeBroglie's Equation to calculate speed, then KE of an electron.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Oct 24, 2020 3:39 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Memorize electromagnetic spectrum for midterm?
Replies: 7
Views: 44

Re: Memorize electromagnetic spectrum for midterm?

An easy way to remember the varying wavelengths on the EM spectrum is that infrared has longer wavelengths and is close to red in the visible light region. As the wavelengths get shorter, you get to violet in the visible light then you move into ultraviolet, and so on into x rays and gamma rays.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Oct 24, 2020 3:33 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Constants
Replies: 21
Views: 106

Re: Constants

There is no specification but I recommend using as many as possible ESPECIALLY when dealing with very small numbers like moles for instance. I have gone through some molecular formula problems and got varying answers solely because I did not use exact amounts for the molar masses.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Sat Oct 24, 2020 3:25 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: How are you studying?
Replies: 203
Views: 1294

Re: How are you studying?

Personally, I feel that for chemistry doing practice problems is a great way to ensure that you are on top of the information. Sometimes, I would make a short outline or "cheat sheet" of the information I know as a refresher and to make sure I understand all of the concepts.
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Mon Oct 19, 2020 5:35 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Detecting wavelike properties based on mass
Replies: 3
Views: 29

Detecting wavelike properties based on mass

I just watched the lecture on De Broglie's Equation and am curious as to whether there is a set value on when an object has a detectable wavelength (not insignificant due to too large of a mass) or if this is something that scientists deem as subjective. Is everything going to be seen as not having ...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Oct 16, 2020 1:30 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Bound vs. Free Electrons
Replies: 6
Views: 55

Re: Bound vs. Free Electrons

Lavelle uses the idea of the free electron, an electron not bound to the nucleus, to explain that why the Emperical Equation is negative. Using a free electron as a reference point, once the electron moves into lower and lower energy levels approaching an atom's nucleus, it is going to be going into...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Fri Oct 16, 2020 1:28 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Lyman Series and Balmer Series
Replies: 4
Views: 39

Re: Lyman Series and Balmer Series

An important thing to note here is that from n=1 to n=2 has the highest energy difference and is therefore the hardest to overcome. This is why UV radiation (Lyman Series) always drops down to n=1 from some higher energy level when emitting electromagnetic radiation given UV light has more energy pe...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 13, 2020 9:35 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Textbook 1A.15
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Textbook 1A.15

Q: In the ultraviolet spectrum of atomic hydrogen, a line is observed at 102.6 nm. Determine the values of n for the initial and final energy levels of the electron during the emission of energy that leads to this spectral line. I am really confused on how to use the different series (Balmer, Lyman,...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 13, 2020 12:11 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Microwaves being harmful?
Replies: 3
Views: 43

Microwaves being harmful?

Ever since I was a child, I have been told to always stand away from the microwave when it is heating food because it is "dangerous" or bad for me. However, according to the electromagnetic spectrum, microwaves have a lower frequency (and therefore less energy) than visible light. Does thi...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 13, 2020 12:03 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photoelectric effect post assessment 31A
Replies: 2
Views: 56

Re: Photoelectric effect post assessment 31A

Another way to think about it is to utilize both equations (E=hv and c= v) and combine them into one larger equation that only has the values E, c, h, and \lambda . Therefore you would get E = ch/ \lambda Knowing your constant values for c and h as well as the Energy of a photon (which is equal to t...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 2:50 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Solving E.15
Replies: 7
Views: 59

Re: Solving E.15

Since you do not know the mystery metal "M" in the metal hydroxide, that is what we need to figure out before we can substitute the hydroxide with sulfide. To do so, subtract the molar mass of the hydroxide (OH)2 by the entire molar mass of the compound: 74.10 g/mol - 33.996 g/mol = 40.104...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:39 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Post Mod #34
Replies: 3
Views: 45

Re: Photoelectric Effect Post Mod #34

Another way to think about it is to utilize both equations (E=hv and c= \lambda v) and combine them into one larger equation that only has the values E, c, h, and \lambda . Therefore you would get E = ch/ \lambda Using 1.97 x 10^-7 m and your constants for c and h, you can find the energy of the pho...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:16 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Dis 1L Week 1 WS #6
Replies: 4
Views: 44

Re: Dis 1L Week 1 WS #6

First, convert the 5.00 g of glucose and the 5.00 g of Oxygen to moles using their respective molar masses. Glucose: 5.00 g x (1 mol/180.156 g) = 0.028 mol Oxygen: 5.00 g x (1 mol/31.998 g) = 0.156 mol Then, we use the molar ratios to determine how many moles of oxygen we would need to complement th...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:03 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: E.17c
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: E.17c

Here's the question for reference: Which sample in each of the following pairs contains the greater number of moles of atoms? (a) 75 g of indium or 80 g of tellurium; (b) 15.0 g of P or 15.0 g of S; (c) 7.36 3 1027 atoms of Ru or 7.36 3 1027 atoms of Fe. Correct, it doesn't matter what element you h...
by Austin Aldujaili 2D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 10:54 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting Reactant Calculation
Replies: 5
Views: 74

Re: Limiting Reactant Calculation

It's also important to always make a quick check as to whether the chemical equation is balanced or not. In this case it already was; however, this should be one of the first things you do or else your molar ratios you use during calculations may end up being wrong and throwing your values off. I kn...

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