Search found 61 matches

by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:53 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: When x is negligible in Equilibrium constant
Replies: 12
Views: 36

Re: When x is negligible in Equilibrium constant

As others have said K should be less than 10^-3 but to using 10^-4 is safer. If that's hard to remember, Sapling says that if the molarity of the initial concentration is 1000 times greater than the K, you can assume x is negligent.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:45 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Constant
Replies: 2
Views: 8

Re: Equilibrium Constant

According to the lecture from last Friday, only temperature can change the equilibrium constant. So if the temperature remains constant, I don't think starting with a higher pressure will result in a larger K value.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:41 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Gas for equilibrium equation
Replies: 2
Views: 10

Re: Gas for equilibrium equation

I think we have to use P before a molecule to denote that we're using the partial pressure of that molecule, otherwise, it may be misconstrued as the concentration.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:38 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Box
Replies: 2
Views: 9

Re: ICE Box

I'd say unless you know for sure that you're working with a strong acid/base (i.e. stated in the problem) to just use the ICE box. It'd be a lot more efficient to only use the OH-/H3O+ concentrations when you know you're working with strong acids/bases but if you're unsure, using the ICE box would b...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Jan 15, 2021 9:30 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: sapling Q.5
Replies: 2
Views: 7

Re: sapling Q.5

I could be wrong but the line after you found the [OH-] concentration, I think you miswrote the exponent on the Kb as -3 instead of -5
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:48 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Pressure and Volume
Replies: 16
Views: 35

Re: Pressure and Volume

They're inversely related. At constant temperature, increasing one will cause the other to decrease. Vice versa, decreasing one will increase the other. As for why, increasing pressure is the same as compressing a system (which effectively decreases the volume). Or when volume is increased, there is...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:45 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: missing section
Replies: 7
Views: 45

Re: missing section

Sections aren't mandatory so missing one is fine. If you're concerned about what you missed, you can email your TA/go to their office hours about what they went over during discussion. You can also attend the UA sessions to catch up on what you missed.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:39 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K and pressure
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: K and pressure

Temperature is the only condition that can change K since it involves a change in the energy of the system which affects whether the forward or reverse reactions will be favored. However, like the others previously stated, changing pressure is equivalent to changing the volume and thus changes the c...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:34 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: identifying solids and non homogeneous reactant/product
Replies: 4
Views: 10

Re: identifying solids and non homogeneous reactant/product

Unless the reaction is a well-known precipitation reaction (e.g. NaCl(aq) + AgNO3(aq) ----> AgCl(s) + NaNO3) which is a reaction that always results in an insoluble solid, then we may be expected to know that a substance is a solid. But as far as I know, we haven't been taught that yet so I'm inclin...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Jan 10, 2021 8:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Conditions of Equilibrium
Replies: 4
Views: 21

Re: Conditions of Equilibrium

I'm a little confused with your question so I might give unnecessary info but the conditions of equilibrium are usually given to us in the problem (with the context of problems that we've been introduced to so far). Future problems may require us to solve for certain conditions given other condition...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Dec 11, 2020 5:12 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization
Replies: 10
Views: 66

Re: hybridization

When we draw the lewis structure of NH3, we get 3 N-H bonds with one lone pair on the N. Which means that N has 4 regions of electron density and since hybridization depends on the # of electron density regions, we also need 4 hybridized orbital which correlates to a sp3 hybridization.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Dec 11, 2020 5:06 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Benzene Sigma/Pi Bonds
Replies: 3
Views: 12

Re: Benzene Sigma/Pi Bonds

Remember that each double bond is composed of a sigma bond and a pi bond. With that in mind, there are 6 sigma bonds from each of the single C-C bonds and another 6 sigma bonds from each of the C-H bonds. The 3 pi bonds comes from the alternating double C=C bonds in the carbon ring.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Dec 11, 2020 4:59 pm
Forum: Polyprotic Acids & Bases
Topic: Textbook 6C.19
Replies: 7
Views: 55

Re: Textbook 6C.19

Relative strength of an acid is related to it's ability to lose an H+ ion. So acids where it's very easy to lose a proton are relatively stronger than acids where it is harder to lose an proton. In other words, weaker bonds=stronger acid. With HF and HCl, the bond between HF is very short because of...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Dec 11, 2020 4:26 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Why are spectator ions of a salt related to strong acids/bases?
Replies: 2
Views: 34

Why are spectator ions of a salt related to strong acids/bases?

I understand why ions of weak acids and bases can make the solutions more alkaline/acidic when interacting with water but I don't get why ions of strong acids/bases don't? What is the reason these strong acid/base ions don't act like the ions of weak acids/bases?
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Dec 11, 2020 4:10 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Week 10 Sapling #6
Replies: 7
Views: 34

Re: Week 10 Sapling #6

The way the book defines weak acid/base is any acid/base classified as strong. https://sites.google.com/site/chempendix/strong-acids-bases . So any acid/base not listed here is considered weak. Since none of the ones you still have left are on the strong acid/base list they are all weak/other NaCl: ...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:47 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Quick rundown on coordination numbers?
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Quick rundown on coordination numbers?

I don't know why but this just isn't clicking with me. Is the coordination number just the amount of bonds/ligands to the central cation? And what relationship do dentates have with the CN (if any)?
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:32 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lone Pair placement
Replies: 10
Views: 66

Re: Lone Pair placement

The position of lone pairs is dependent on the electron geometry and is determined by what is the most favorable position (usually opposite from each other and equatorial). H2O has tetrahedral geometry and two lone pairs. It's a bit hard to envision but if you look it up, it really doesn't matter wh...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:20 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted vs. Lewis bases
Replies: 11
Views: 70

Re: Bronsted vs. Lewis bases

I think so. Bronsted bases are proton acceptors while Lewis bases are electron donors, so while all Bronsted bases are also Lewis bases, I believe not all Lewis bases are Bronsted bases. For instance BF3 + F- ----> BF4-. F- is considered the Lewis base since it donated its lone pair but in and of it...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Dec 05, 2020 8:05 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Do acids always list hydrogens as the first element in a molecule?
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: Do acids always list hydrogens as the first element in a molecule?

As the person said above, I'd say it depends on whether we're discussing Lewis acids or Bronsted acids. Lewis acids are defined as electron pair acceptors, so compounds like BF3 which accepts a lone pair from F-, is considered an acid but doesn't contain any H. However, Bronsted acids (which the tex...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Dec 05, 2020 7:56 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Unhybridized orbitals
Replies: 5
Views: 37

Re: Unhybridized orbitals

Since the number of electron density regions is equivalent to the amount of hybridized orbitals, whatever's left is unhybridized. For instance, in a compound there's 2 e- density regions which means there's 2 hybridized orbitals, or a sp hybridization. Since the p subshell has 3 orbitals but only 1 ...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 9:07 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: How to find the hybridization
Replies: 14
Views: 92

Re: How to find the hybridization

This is the way I understand it so anyone is free to correct me if I'm wrong lol. The # of regions of electron density surrounding an atom is equivalent to the # of hybrid orbitals. So if an atom has 3 bonds and 1 lone pair, there should be 4 hybrid orbitals. The type of hybridization is then determ...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:50 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Does electronegativity cancel?
Replies: 4
Views: 37

Re: Does electronegativity cancel?

From my understanding, electronegativities do not cancel. They're not like charges where formal charges of atoms within a molecule contribute to the overall charge of the molecule. Electronegativity "stays" with its atom, for lack of a better word. In a molecule where one atom is highly el...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:43 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Sapling #12
Replies: 3
Views: 13

Re: Sapling #12

Yup! You can check by comparing the molar mass of CH4O with the given molar mass of the unknown compound since they should match. CH4O is approximately 32.041 g/mol which is essentially the same as the MM of the unknown compound so you should have the right molecular formula.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:37 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: H20 Shape
Replies: 17
Views: 98

Re: H20 Shape

The square planar shape requires an octohedral electron geometry where 2 electron density regions are lone pairs. Since H2O only has 4 regions of electron density, it has tetrahedral geometry and so it's not possible for it to be square planar nor linear. Now given a tetrahedral geometry with two lo...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:29 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Resonance Structure Definition
Replies: 9
Views: 63

Re: Resonance Structure Definition

So in other words, its basically the exact same molecule/lewis structure except you move the double bond/triple bond to another of the same atom? Yes, to everything but that last part. The atoms are all in the same spot and only the double/triple bonds are "moving". They don't always have...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:22 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: How do bonds affect shapes?
Replies: 11
Views: 64

Re: How do bonds affect shapes?

The type of bond (single, double, triple) does not affect the shape of the molecule, or at least it doesn't affect the overall shape of the molecule significantly. All bonds and lone pairs (LP) are treated as regions of electron density. You're somewhat on the right track with counting the amount of...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 29, 2020 8:08 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet Exceptions
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Octet Exceptions

I think the rule of thumb is that p-block of n=3 and below can accommodate an expanded octet because they have a d-subshell to fit more valence electrons into (although they don't always have an expanded octet). As for a set/maximum number of electrons, (I really don't know so this is really just my...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:44 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Outline 2: Objective #12
Replies: 6
Views: 38

Re: Outline 2: Objective #12

Remember that atomic orbitals exist in 4 different shapes, or wave functions (s, p, d, f). We don't really know the exact position of an electron at any given point in time but by finding the square of the wave function, we can find the probability of finding an electron in a given orbital. It's har...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:25 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Book Problem 1F3
Replies: 5
Views: 63

Re: Book Problem 1F3

When atoms are isoelectronic (here they all have the same # of electrons as Argon), the size of the ion essentially boils down to which ion has the most protons. The more protons there are, the more positive charges there are to attract all the electrons (as someone said before this is called the ef...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:20 am
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Textbook question 1E.9
Replies: 4
Views: 45

Re: Textbook question 1E.9

It'd first be helpful to remember the "bounds" of the quantum number and that the numbers are ordered by {n, l, ml, ms}. l can be 0 to (n-1), ml can be -l to +l (including 0), and ms can only be +1/2 or -1/2. Given these bounds, we can say that (a) is valid set of quantum numbers since non...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:12 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Textbook 2E #27c
Replies: 6
Views: 23

Re: Textbook 2E #27c

The difference in electronegativity between C and Cl would result in three of the bonds in CHCl3 to be polar. The C-H bond is also slightly polar but it's neither as strong as C-Cl or as numerous. Because of the shape of CHCl3 (tetrahedral if I'm not mistaken), then the electron density of the molec...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 21, 2020 11:03 am
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Boiling vs. Melting Point
Replies: 15
Views: 100

Re: Boiling vs. Melting Point

Boiling point is the temperature where a compound changes from liquid to gas whereas the melting point is where a molecule/element changes from solid to liquid. A simple example of boiling is when water becomes water vapor, and melting is when ice becomes water. In context of what we're learning rig...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Nov 17, 2020 1:07 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Textbook Question Number 2B 11 part C
Replies: 2
Views: 28

Re: Textbook Question Number 2B 11 part C

Yeah so the resonance structures would be the double bond of the carbon switching between the two oxygens since both theoretically work. But as the person above said, the answer the book gave is more favorable since there are no charged atoms in the compound.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Nov 17, 2020 12:56 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: subshells and orbitals
Replies: 9
Views: 93

Re: subshells and orbitals

I think you have it backward, orbitals are parts of a subshell, not the other way around. The order goes shell>subshell>orbital. Within a given subshell (s,p,d,f), there is a certain number of orbitals that can each contain 2 electrons.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Nov 17, 2020 12:49 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Periodic Trends Summarized
Replies: 6
Views: 63

Re: Periodic Trends Summarized

Atomic/Ionic radius: Trend: Increases down a group and increases as you go left across a period (or you could remember it as decreases as it goes right). Increases as you approach bottom left corner Reason: bigger atoms have larger radii and larger atoms in the same period have more nuclear charge s...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Nov 17, 2020 12:18 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic and Covalent Character
Replies: 2
Views: 41

Re: Ionic and Covalent Character

I think the trend would still apply. Remember that ionic character and covalent character aren't mutually exclusive. Even in Groups 1/2, the size of the atoms increases which makes it easier for electrons to be shared since they're farther away from the nucleus and which then increases covalent char...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Nov 17, 2020 12:12 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis acids and Bases
Replies: 20
Views: 119

Re: Lewis acids and Bases

Since Lewis acids are electron acceptors and Lewis bases are electron donors, it's best to draw the Lewis dot structure of a compound to see their valence electrons. Compounds that are electron-deficient and need electrons for an octet such as BF3 are bases, while compounds that have lone-pair elect...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 07, 2020 7:17 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Elements with similar number of electrons
Replies: 9
Views: 52

Re: Elements with similar number of electrons

I'm not sure what your question is really saying since you said similar number of electrons. Since this could technically refer to isoelectronic atoms (different elements that have the same amount of electrons) and elements that are close together on the periodic table (close number of electrons at ...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 07, 2020 7:09 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Angular momentum quantum #s over 3
Replies: 4
Views: 14

Re: Angular momentum quantum #s over 3

Theoretically, there would be a g, h, etc. subshells but due to the Aufbau principle, an atom would need A LOT of electrons to fill all the way to the g-subshell and beyond (no ground state element has enough, as far as I know). So for practical purposes, the s, p, d, f-subshells are the only ones w...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 07, 2020 7:02 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Isoelectric atoms
Replies: 9
Views: 38

Re: Isoelectric atoms

Isoelectronic atoms have the same number of electrons. Their charges would differ depending on how many electrons were added/removed to result in the atoms to be comparatively isoelectronic. Electronegativity and ionization energies are also different despite the same amount of electrons since these...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 07, 2020 6:56 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance Structures
Replies: 10
Views: 48

Re: Resonance Structures

Resonance structures are the individual structures of a particular molecule. In a sense, it's each possible drawing where the bond(s) is/are shifting. The resonance hybrid is the mix of all these resonance structures. Like in the case of benzene, the resonance structures are the two possible hexagon...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Nov 07, 2020 6:52 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Fluorine
Replies: 7
Views: 40

Re: Fluorine

Firstly, since Fluorine already has 7 valence electrons, it really "wants" another valence electron to fulfill the octet rule. This is the case for all the other halogens as well. Now why it's more electronegative compared to the other halogens, as the others have said, is due to Fluorine'...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Strength of bonds
Replies: 13
Views: 90

Re: Strength of bonds

From highest to lowest I believe the bond strength (in general) is as follows: multiple covalent bonds > single covalent bonds > ionic bonds > hydrogen bonds > van der Waals force.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:22 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: when n=5 and l=4
Replies: 16
Views: 150

Re: when n=5 and l=4

When the quantum number n=5, l can theoretically equal 4 but is not necessarily (or realistically 4). When n=5, l can be 0,1,2,3,4 since the values of l range from 0 to n-1. l=4 would also result in subshell g but as far as I know, no ground state elements have electrons in the g subshell.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:17 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Octet Rule
Replies: 12
Views: 74

Re: Octet Rule

H, He, Li, and Be don't apply to the octet rule since they essentially only have access to the 1s subshell which will be stable with (and can only contain) two electrons. But other exceptions exist such as boron and aluminum that often don't follow the octet rule but Lavelle hasn't covered those yet...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:11 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Unusual Electron Configuration
Replies: 3
Views: 47

Re: Unusual Electron Configuration

It's a bit of a difficult concept and I'm not too sure if I have a complete understanding as well but I think the gist of it is that filling the electrons using the Aufbau principle does not always result in the most stable atom. In the case of copper, the config is [Ar]4s^2 3d^9 . I believe the sta...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:58 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Dot order
Replies: 11
Views: 103

Re: Dot order

It really doesn't matter where the electrons are located or how they are filled. Though many use the start at the top and fill in a clockwise way to fill Lewis structures, at the end of the day, I think the dot orders are just a visual interpretation designed to easily see the valence e- of atoms/co...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:53 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: N levels for electron configurations
Replies: 6
Views: 44

Re: N levels for electron configurations

The quantum number ℓ would specify the orbital shape aka the subshell (s, p, d, f). In this case, it would mean the p-subshell and each subshell has a specific amount of electrons (s=2 max e-, p=6 max e-, etc.)
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Oct 27, 2020 10:38 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Book problem E15
Replies: 2
Views: 46

Book problem E15

E.15 The molar mass of the metal hydroxide M(OH)2 is 74.10g⋅mol−1. What is the molar mass of the sulfide of this metal? The notation kind of confused me but is it basically saying that "M" is an arbitrary element? And to solve you would just subtract the molar mass of the (OH)2 and add the...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Fri Oct 23, 2020 5:12 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Do elements retain electronegativity even when ionized?
Replies: 3
Views: 34

Do elements retain electronegativity even when ionized?

This is pertaining to #16 on sapling which asks to order ions according to atomic radius. All the ions have the same amount of electrons so I'm thinking the radius has to be determined by how electronegative the element is when it's not ionized?
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module Question 28
Replies: 9
Views: 71

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module Question 28

Right, for this specific part of the problem, the work function doesn't have any use. If I remember correctly, the work function was used in a different problem with the same context. But since you asked what else we can derive from the work function (aka threshold energy or energy to remove electro...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:32 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: m vs nm
Replies: 66
Views: 426

Re: m vs nm

Unless specified otherwise, both units would be acceptable since m is the SI unit for length and nm is the common unit for wavelength. But if you want to be safe, you could also just write both units since it's a fairly quick and easy conversion.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:26 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: How are you studying?
Replies: 203
Views: 1248

Re: How are you studying?

I agree with everyone's studying methods above but honestly what works for other people isn't always gonna work for you. So definitely try out everyone's suggestions but also figure out what helps you learn best. For me, I'm also not particularly good at staying on top of work if I don't designate s...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module Question 28
Replies: 9
Views: 71

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module Question 28

Hi! You're right that m would be the mass of the electron but keep the units as kilograms (9.109 × 10^-31 kg). Not only are kilograms the SI unit for mass but since energy in Joules is equivalent to , keeping the mass in kilograms is necessary to get the correct answer.
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:11 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Speed of Light Equation
Replies: 6
Views: 48

Re: Speed of Light Equation

I believe the speed of light and it's related equations should remain constant in a vacuum but does change when travelling through a medium (like air, water, etc.). For our class, I believe we'll only work with the assumption that light is travelling in a vacuum and in any non-vacuum cases, he will ...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Sat Oct 17, 2020 4:03 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: "Intensity"
Replies: 20
Views: 133

Re: "Intensity"

I'm essentially reiterating everyone's answers but yes they are the same. When referring to intensity of a light, we're talking about the amount of photons that are being emitted by a particular light source. Each individual photon has the same amplitude but since there's so much of them, they add u...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Thu Oct 15, 2020 4:20 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: WK 2 Sapling #5
Replies: 4
Views: 71

WK 2 Sapling #5

Could someone explain how to find the number of spectral lines when an electron drops from a specific energy level? I'm not sure how to approach this problem. "The electron in a hydrogen atom is excited to energy level n=6 and emits electromagnetic radiation when returning to lower energy level...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Tue Oct 13, 2020 5:45 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Textbook Question 1B15
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: Textbook Question 1B15

Hi!

Yeah, you do have to convert km/s to m/s since all the units need to be in SI units.

You would also need to use the de Broglie equation where m is the mass of the electron (9.1 x 10^-31 kg).
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:04 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Sig figs and molar mass
Replies: 18
Views: 101

Re: Sig figs and molar mass

Like everyone else said, it's typically best to use the listed molar mass on the periodic table. Second best option would probably be to round to at least 3 decimals. It's always best to get the most accurate answer we can (but if you are in a timecrunch, rounding elements like hydrogen, carbon, and...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:50 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect question help
Replies: 1
Views: 21

Re: Photoelectric Effect question help

Hi! To start off, since the question is asking for kinetic energy were gonna have to use the equation Ek = \frac{1}{2}mv^{2} where m and v are the mass and velocity of the electron (in this part of the question, the work function doesn't have any purpose). Inputting the mass of an electron (approx 9...
by Earl Garrovillo 2L
Thu Oct 08, 2020 4:37 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: WK 1 Sapling #10
Replies: 7
Views: 87

WK 1 Sapling #10

I know like a million people have posted about this question so I apologize if this is a bit repetitive (or if it's a stupid question lol) #10 asks: "Consider the nucleophilic addition reaction of 2-butanone with excess propyl magnesium bromide, made in situ by reacting 1-bromopropane with meta...

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