Search found 70 matches

by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:18 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Standard State
Replies: 11
Views: 29

Re: Standard State

standard state just means the element or compound is at 1 atm and 25 degrees Celsius
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:16 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Exothermic and Endothermic Reactions
Replies: 9
Views: 34

Re: Exothermic and Endothermic Reactions

Catalysts lower the activation energy in order to provide an alternative path for the reaction to proceed but because enthalpy is a state property, it is not dependent on the path of the reaction and thus the value remains the same for both endothermic and exothermic reactions regardless of if there...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:15 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Endothermic Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 23

Re: Endothermic Reactions

the formation of ionic compounds is exothermic because the resulting compound is more stable than the individual ions, and I believe the same goes for ionic compounds made from polyatomic ions.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:12 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: State Property
Replies: 18
Views: 49

Re: State Property

State property is any property where we should subtract the final-initial value to determine the actual value of the state property. Examples would be pressure, volume, temperature and enthalpy because it does not matter what path is taken.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Jan 23, 2021 3:09 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Elements Not in standard state
Replies: 5
Views: 39

Re: Elements Not in standard state

You would just need to account for the enthalpy of the phase change, but I think more often than not we would be dealing with compounds in their standard state.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:53 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle with Temperature
Replies: 7
Views: 27

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle with Temperature

You can think of heat as part of the equation ( on the reactant side if it is endothermic or product side if exothermic) so increasing the temperature causes equilibrium to shift in the same way it would if we were increasing concentration. Similarly, for an endothermic reaction, we need heat to abs...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:48 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: pka and ka
Replies: 5
Views: 30

Re: pka and ka

We look at pKA to see if the predominant species of an acid is in its protonated or deprotonated form as well as if a base is charged or neutral. pH is the -log(hydrogen concentration) so that tells us of the acidity of the solution and knowing the pH we can also find the pOH, just like knowing the ...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:46 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Autoprotolysis Constant of Water
Replies: 7
Views: 19

Re: Autoprotolysis Constant of Water

its definitely something we should remember because the value of Kw allows us to find the concentration of hydrogen or hydronium ions that we can then use to find PH or if you take the log pkw then we get 14 which Is why the pH+pOH has to add up to 14, so overall its a pretty significant concept for...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:45 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: The Quadratic equation
Replies: 7
Views: 25

Re: The Quadratic equation

It can be used for questions about the pressure of each gas as well. Generally the premise is that you set up an ICE table to compare the initial pressure/concentration etc with that of equilibrium and plug in those expressions into K or Q equation to solve for x and that is when you would need the ...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:42 am
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Pressure Rule
Replies: 29
Views: 191

Re: Pressure Rule

you only look at the moles of gases because gases are the ones that are contributing to the pressure in the reaction vessel.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:53 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment
Replies: 11
Views: 27

Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 1A Post-Module Assessment

When a reaction reaches equilibrium the rates of the forward and reverse reaction are equal but the reaction itself has not entirely stopped
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:52 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Ideal Gas Law Question
Replies: 11
Views: 66

Re: Ideal Gas Law Question

I think temperature would just be the temperature of the reaction at the instance we are calculating for so its not constant but it is a variable that has to be given a value in order to solve the equation
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:50 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Q>K
Replies: 10
Views: 48

Re: Q>K

I think that there are many instances where the reaction does not reach equilibrium rather it just shifts back and forth between favoring the forward or reverse reaction
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:50 am
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: names for reaction quotient Q
Replies: 19
Views: 70

Re: names for reaction quotient Q

They are all names for reaction quotient just referring to different measurements whether that be partial pressure or concentration in molarity etc.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:04 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Study Habits
Replies: 96
Views: 267

Re: Study Habits

I think it would be helpful to go to the UA sessions earlier because I really only went for the review sessions and I think if I had gone earlier there would have been less stress when it came time for the final
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 10:01 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Chemical Equilibrium Part 2 Post Module #30
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: Chemical Equilibrium Part 2 Post Module #30

You only include the water vapor, hydrogen gas and carbon dioxide in your calculations for the equilibrium constant so you find the molarity by first converting into moles by dividing by the molar mass and then divide by volume 50 L to find the molarity.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 9:57 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Favoring
Replies: 6
Views: 52

Re: Favoring

When you add more reactants the equilibrium shifts to the right toward the products and you can tell because in the equation for the constant, the denominator is now greater than the numerator and it shifts. The same goes for if you add more product, equilibrium shifts to the left.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:19 am
Forum: Industrial Examples
Topic: Chemotherapy
Replies: 18
Views: 382

Re: Chemotherapy

I think cisplatin Is the only one we would need to know and it is significant because both chlorines are on the same side of the complex, cis, which allows it to form two bonds with Guanine to stop DNA replication of cancer cells
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:18 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Exceptions outside the ones we memorized
Replies: 6
Views: 62

Re: Exceptions outside the ones we memorized

Boron is another atom that often has only 6 electrons and then will form a coordinate covalent bond with another atom supplying both electrons
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:17 am
Forum: *Particle in a Box
Topic: Energy Equations
Replies: 9
Views: 103

Re: Energy Equations

it just depends if we are solving for frequency of wavelength based on the energy of a photon, E
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:17 am
Forum: *Particle in a Box
Topic: Energy Equations
Replies: 9
Views: 103

Re: Energy Equations

it just depends if we are solving for frequency of wavelength based on the energy of a photon, E
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:16 am
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Question 7 sapling
Replies: 5
Views: 25

Re: Question 7 sapling

You can look at the conjugate acid and base, so for instance KCl will make KOH and HCl which are both strong acids and bases so it is a neutral salt, whereas a salt with ammonium will be acidic because when it reacts with water, it will release a hydrogen and the conjugate base is NH3- a weak conjug...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sun Dec 13, 2020 9:14 am
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Why does acid rain exist
Replies: 13
Views: 147

Re: Why does acid rain exist

When fossil fuels etc release CO2, SO2, and NO2 they react with the hydrogen in water to create acids such as H2SO4 and H2CO3 which is what lowers the pH of water causing acid rain
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:09 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Denticity of CO3^(2-) (#9C.5b)
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Denticity of CO3^(2-) (#9C.5b)

Normally carbonate has 120 degrees between its oxygens making it monodentate since it can only bind to the transition metal once, but the carbonate bonds to two different metals, then it is bidentate.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:05 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: How to Determine if a Ligand is polydentate?
Replies: 6
Views: 82

Re: How to Determine if a Ligand is polydentate?

I believe there should be a prefix before the name of the ligand that would indicate the number of ligands present. If there is a bis-, tris etc prefix, this means the ligand is polydentate or the name of the ligand already includes a greek prefix
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:03 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Molecular Geometry vs. Electron Geometry
Replies: 6
Views: 38

Re: Molecular Geometry vs. Electron Geometry

The general structure for molecular geometry depends on the areas of electron density, whereas the actual electron geometry depends on the number of bonded pairs and lone pairs
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:01 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Strength of Bronsted Acids & Bases Given Periodic Table
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: Strength of Bronsted Acids & Bases Given Periodic Table

I believe those trends still apply. Metal oxides form bases and nonmetal oxides are generally more acidic, and then metalloids are amphoteric
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 3:00 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Bases
Topic: Is trichloroacetic acid stronger than acetic acid?
Replies: 5
Views: 172

Re: Is trichloroacetic acid stronger than acetic acid?

The chlorine, since it has a higher electronegativity, is able to withdraw more electron density from the oxygen resulting in more delocalized electrons and a more stable resulting anion. This is why trichloroacetic acid is the stronger acid
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 2:58 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Acid Bond Strength
Replies: 5
Views: 35

Re: Acid Bond Strength

I believe we just consider bond length, which is directly related to bond strength and the stability of the resulting anion to determine which compound can more easily donate an H+ therefore making it a stronger acid
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 9:10 am
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Bond Order
Replies: 11
Views: 193

Re: Bond Order

if the bond order is zero then the two atoms are not bonded because bond order is a measurement of the number of electrons involved in a bond between two atoms
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 9:09 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization Clarification
Replies: 9
Views: 61

Re: Hybridization Clarification

Hybrid orbitals have energy that is between two regular orbitals such as 2s and 2p. They allow for atoms to have a certain number of bonds to complete their octet, namely carbon in organic compounds.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 9:07 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sapling Week 7 & 8 HW Question 11
Replies: 14
Views: 108

Re: Sapling Week 7 & 8 HW Question 11

To determine hybridization you look at the number of regions of electron density which includes both bonding pairs and lone pairs. However, a double or triple bond is still considered only one region of electron density. If you have two, then you have an sp hybrid orbital, three would be sp2 and so ...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 9:06 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sapling week 7/8 problem 18
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: Sapling week 7/8 problem 18

I was reading that the hybridization determines whether or not the molecule is coplanar or not. For instance, if the carbon atoms have sp3 hybridization then there needs to be an even number of double bonds for it to be planar, but for sp2 hybridization it has to be an odd number
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 9:02 am
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: What does delocalized π bond mean?
Replies: 18
Views: 147

Re: What does delocalized π bond mean?

A delocalized pi bond comes from resonance structures that allow the electrons to be delocalized as well such that the bonds are spread evenly across the resonance structures so each bond length is actually the same
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:59 am
Forum: *Liquid Structure (Viscosity, Surface Tension, Liquid Crystals, Ionic Liquids)
Topic: Boiling and Melting point
Replies: 18
Views: 122

Re: Boiling and Melting point

They are related in that when you are comparing two molecules or compounds, if one has a higher melting point it is likely to also have a higher boiling point because the same intermolecular forces contribute to both properties of the chemicals
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:59 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Dipole-Dipole vs Dipole-Induced Dipole
Replies: 5
Views: 54

Re: Dipole-Dipole vs Dipole-Induced Dipole

I think the difference is the interaction between dipole-dipole would involve two polar molecules that already have a partial positive and partial negative charge due to the unequal sharing of electrons, but in an induced dipole, it is a nearby dipole that causes fluctuations in electron density cre...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:57 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: hydrogen bonding
Replies: 7
Views: 98

Re: hydrogen bonding

In order to have hydrogen bonding, the hydrogen must be first bonded to a highly electronegative atom, whether that be oxygen, nitrogen, or fluorine, and then also be nearby another highly electronegative atom. For instance, if you have a CH4 molecule next to a water molecule, even though there is b...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:54 am
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond Strength in DNA
Replies: 12
Views: 123

Re: Bond Strength in DNA

The ability to form 3 hydrogen bonds compared to 2 bonds would make G-C base pairs both stronger and more stable
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:53 am
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Ionic Character
Replies: 12
Views: 3431

Re: Ionic Character

I believe to determine ionic character you have to look at the electronegativity difference between the two elements in a bond. For instance, if you compare LiCl and NaCl, though they are both salts and have ionic bonds, NaCl is has a greater ionic character because there is a greater EN difference ...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 4:06 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: London Dispersion Forces
Replies: 9
Views: 87

Re: London Dispersion Forces

London dispersion forces occur when there is a small electronegativity difference between two atoms and if the shape of the molecule is symmetrical this shows an even distribution of electrons and dispersion forces.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 4:03 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Electron Distortion and Polarizing Power Periodic Trend
Replies: 2
Views: 30

Re: Electron Distortion and Polarizing Power Periodic Trend

Generally, polarizability would decrease as you go down a group because an atom with a larger volume would have less charge density and therefore a lower polarizing power than a smaller atom in that same group. For ions, the ion with the greater charge and a smaller size would have more polarizing p...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 4:01 pm
Forum: Polarisability of Anions, The Polarizing Power of Cations
Topic: Polarizability
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Polarizability

For intramolecular forces, the polarizability depends on how distorted the electrons are- when electrons are not as tightly held, they are more easily distorted, and therefore more polarizable. For ions, a cation with a greater charge would have a higher charge density and therefore a greater polari...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 3:57 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Boiling/Melting Points
Replies: 15
Views: 115

Re: Boiling/Melting Points

Boiling and melting points are mostly determined by polarizability, which depends on the number of electrons and the size of atom/molecule. For instance, when comparing two compounds such as CH4 and CCl4, Cl is much more polarizable because it is larger and the electrons are more shielded from the n...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 3:54 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Bond Strengths
Replies: 10
Views: 85

Re: Bond Strengths

I believe the number of bonds is the key factor because a triple bond is stronger than both a single and double bond, as well as having a much shorter bond length because of the high level of attraction. In addition, you would look at the other factors when comparing bond strength between molecules ...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Sat Nov 14, 2020 3:50 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Lecture 17 Question
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Re: Lecture 17 Question

The value is in moles of NaCl and it is negative which indicates a favorable attraction because energy is released when the two ions form a bond
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 06, 2020 12:59 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: H20 Example from Lecture today
Replies: 4
Views: 49

Re: H20 Example from Lecture today

It would be a coordinate covalent bond only if a hydrogen atom is supplying both of the electrons in a covalent bond, however in this case there are two hydrogen atoms each sharing one electron
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 06, 2020 12:58 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Lewis acids/Bases
Replies: 4
Views: 22

Re: Lewis acids/Bases

A lewis base donates electrons, so it would be an anion usually. a lewis acid accepts electrons so it would be a metal cation, a molecule where the central atom does not have an octet because they are electron deficient, or molecules with polar double bonds
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 06, 2020 12:56 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: What do we use formal charges for?
Replies: 15
Views: 51

Re: What do we use formal charges for?

We use formal charge to determine the most stable Lewis structure for a molecule with resonance. a formal charge of zero is the most stable
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 06, 2020 12:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: 2A.1
Replies: 4
Views: 42

Re: 2A.1

I think the easiest way would be to either write out the electron configurations or look at the group they are in, for instance Si is below carbon so it also has 4 valence electrons. Boron is in the same group as aluminum which usually has a 3+ charge meaning it has 3 valence electrons.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Nov 06, 2020 12:53 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Textbook Problem 2A.11
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: Textbook Problem 2A.11

An oxidation state of +3 means that the atom is losing 3 electrons, so now we need to find an atom with the correct total number of electrons. Remember as well that electrons are first removed from the 4s shell before 3D because when it is occupied with electrons it has lower energy than the 4s subs...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:26 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: position units
Replies: 19
Views: 129

Re: position units

For the uncertainty principle, you should use meters and kilograms because this allows for the appropriate unit cancellation
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:25 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Exercise 1A #15
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Re: Exercise 1A #15

Instead of using the Rydberg equation, solve for the change in energy by using -hr/n^2 for the final and initial energy states. We know that the final is n=1 because it is 102.6 nm which is in the Lyman series for ultraviolet radiation. Then you can find the initial energy level and solve.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:23 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: when to use the kinetic energy equation and when to use Bohr's equation
Replies: 2
Views: 38

Re: when to use the kinetic energy equation and when to use Bohr's equation

In part b we find the energy required to remove an electron, which means we have found the work function. Then, since we are given the velocity of the electron, you can find the kinetic energy and add that to the work function to find the total energy of the incoming photon. If you use E=hv, you are...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:21 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Probability Density
Replies: 3
Views: 56

Re: Probability Density

probability density is to determine which locations most likely have a greater number of electrons, but not the probability of finding one electron.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:20 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Question 1D.25
Replies: 6
Views: 50

Re: Question 1D.25

2d cannot exist because the second principal energy level only contains the s and p orbitals. When n=2, L= n-1, which is just 1, which specifies that it contains the s and p orbital, but not the d orbital which has the quantum number l=2. Similarly, the fourth energy level can only hold the s,p, and...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:14 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Sapling HW #9
Replies: 4
Views: 44

Re: Sapling HW #9

You use Rydberg's formula and then once you have the frequency, use c=(wavelength)(frequency) to solve for the wavelength
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:11 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Sapling #22
Replies: 11
Views: 111

Re: Sapling #22

you need to solve for velocity because then it is part of the kinetic energy formula, E=hv gives the total energy of the wave not the kinetic energy specifically
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:08 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: Textbook Problem 1B27
Replies: 6
Views: 49

Re: Textbook Problem 1B27

You use 10 m/s for the uncertainty because if the velocity is +/- 5 m/s then the values for velocity can vary by 10 m/s so that is the value you use in your calculation
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:06 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Schrodinger's Equation
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Re: Schrodinger's Equation

We have not had to use the equation yet in math problems, but for concepts- the electron with wavelike properties and indeterminacy can be described by a wave function. The wave function represents the height of a wave and when you square it gives the probability of finding an electron
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:03 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Electron Density
Replies: 4
Views: 51

Re: Electron Density

The wave function is the height of a wave at position x,y,z and then when you square the wave function it shows the probability of finding an electron at that point. Since it is being squared, there are only positive values but it does reach zero
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:39 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Sapling HW-Spectral Lines
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Sapling HW-Spectral Lines

Each transition of an electron to another energy level produces one spectral line. For example, the transition from n=7 to n=6 would produce one spectral line. I saw on another site that you can use the formula n1(n2-n1) to determine the number of spectral lines that should be produced, and for this...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:36 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: photons and quanta
Replies: 7
Views: 80

Re: photons and quanta

Quanta is a discrete unit of something, such as energy. In this case, photons possess a discrete, or quantized, amount of energy.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:34 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Excited state of an electron
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: Excited state of an electron

n refers to the energy level of an electron, which is a quantized value, and can therefore only be a whole number. The difference in energy, delta E, can be an integer because it is not a discrete value, but the energy levels themselves cannot have decimals.
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:32 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Balmer vs Lyman
Replies: 12
Views: 108

Re: Balmer vs Lyman

The Balmer series occurs within the visible light region, whereas the Lyman series is part of the ultraviolet region. The Balmer series occurs at a higher energy level, and therefore has a lower frequency and longer wavelength, which makes sense as the visible light region has longer wavelengths tha...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 2:27 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: "Intensity"
Replies: 20
Views: 134

Re: "Intensity"

The energy of the photons have to reach the threshold energy of the electrons on the metal surface, otherwise, regardless of the intensity of light or number of photons, no electrons will be emitted. Since increasing the intensity of the light does not always result in electrons being emitted, this ...
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Oct 09, 2020 12:02 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Limiting reactants in all chemical rxns?
Replies: 18
Views: 148

Re: Limiting reactants in all chemical rxns?

Yes I believe all reactions would have a limiting reactant because you have a theoretical yield but in reality, when you perform any reaction, there are impurities or side reactions that occur that generally result in having less product than you had theoretically calculated
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Fri Oct 09, 2020 9:30 am
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: When to convert units?
Replies: 12
Views: 100

Re: When to convert units?

I think generally when we start a problem we are supposed to convert to SI units- meters, liters, seconds and then give answers in terms of those units
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 3:31 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Question about Molar Ratios with Limiting Reactants
Replies: 8
Views: 63

Re: Question about Molar Ratios with Limiting Reactants

Once you determine the moles of reactants, you have to multiply by the mole ratio of products: reactants in order to find the theoretical yield of any particular product, you always want to have the moles of product in the numerator so you cancel out the moles of reactant in the denominator
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 3:27 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamentals Section G 13
Replies: 3
Views: 41

Re: Fundamentals Section G 13

I am assuming that we will be able to use the calculator to answer any time and if not we will probably be giving an estimate
by AnjikaFriedman-Jha2D
Mon Oct 05, 2020 7:56 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: State in chemical reactions
Replies: 13
Views: 117

Re: State in chemical reactions

Hello, I believe Dr. Lavelle said that when you know the states of a compound for sure you can write them; for instance if it is a salt, but generally we are not required to know the states of more obscure elements or molecules

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