Search found 62 matches

by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 3:10 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling HW Q9
Replies: 1
Views: 18

Re: Sapling HW Q9

pKa of a weak acid is the negative log of Ka = [H3O+][A-]/[HA] which [A-] is the conjugate base of that acid after losing the proton. pH is the negative log of [H3O+]. If pKa equals to pH then Ka = [H3O+], therefore [A-]/[HA] = 1. There are equal amount of HA, the neural form of that weak acid, and ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 2:36 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Heating an Exothermic Reaction
Replies: 7
Views: 20

Re: Heating an Exothermic Reaction

You can think of heat as a product of an exothermic reaction. Increasing temperature is equal to adding heat to the reaction therefore according to the le Chatelier's Principle the equilibrium will favor the other side which is the reactant.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Jan 17, 2021 2:34 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling HW1 Question 9
Replies: 6
Views: 29

Re: Sapling HW1 Question 9

Hi, you can first calculate the Kc value base on the given concentration because it is already at the equilibrium. When you are setting up the ice table for every 2 mols of NO used, you gain 1 mol of N2 and 1 mol of O2 so it will be: [NO]=0.8-2x; [N2]=0.3+x; [O2]=0.3+x.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Jan 16, 2021 2:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Difference between ionization and protonation
Replies: 5
Views: 25

Re: Difference between ionization and protonation

Like the previous posts have said, ionization refers to the lost of proton which can also be considered as how much it dissociates in water, therefore it refers to the acid; protonation is the addition of proton and it refers to the base. The calculation process is the same, and you just need to kee...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Jan 16, 2021 2:21 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: ka vs kb
Replies: 20
Views: 60

Re: ka vs kb

Yes, Ka of an acid multiplies with the Kb of its conjugate base is equal to Kw and vice versa. Ka and Kb can be calculated through that relationship between a pair of acid and its conjugate base but the naming is remained unique to its chemical properties as an acid or base.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Jan 10, 2021 4:38 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Stability
Replies: 8
Views: 46

Re: Stability

Like most posts have mentioned Q compares to K in a reaction does not tell you the stability of reactant or product. However, the value of K does tell you which side of the reaction is favored(large K favors product and small K favors reactant) and when we talk about favored side it is generally mor...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Jan 10, 2021 3:56 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Units
Replies: 27
Views: 84

Re: Units

Bar is the SI unit for the gas pressure and 1 bar is very close to 1 atm so we can use either of them, when the gas is presented in mols per liter it is showing its concentration and can be converted to pressure through ideal gas law.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:17 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Temp Increase on Exothermic Reactions
Replies: 3
Views: 16

Re: Temp Increase on Exothermic Reactions

You can think of heat as a product of an exothermic reaction, therefore when you increase temperature, it is the same as adding heat to the product side of the reaction therefore more reactants will be produced. Same with endothermic reaction, you can think heat as a reactant required for the reacti...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:10 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Calculating concentrations using ICE Chart
Replies: 8
Views: 33

Re: Calculating concentrations using ICE Chart

Yes because when you solve for x in the equation you usually multiply the K constant and the x together to form one term in the quadratic formula, if x itself cannot be larger than the initial concentration(in your case 0.1) and K is very small <1*10^-4 their product will be less then 1*10^-5 which ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Jan 09, 2021 3:59 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Le Chatelier's Principle
Replies: 4
Views: 21

Re: Le Chatelier's Principle

It is possible that when you suddenly add a lot of N2, all the H2 in the system will react with those N2 and become the limiting reactant. However, if you wait for the equilibrium to be reestablished some of the newly formed NH3 will eventually break down back to N2 and H2, since the concentration o...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Mon Jan 04, 2021 3:12 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: 14B Discussion Sections
Replies: 4
Views: 56

Re: 14B Discussion Sections

On my ccle site although I can see all the names of TAs, only one of them has its name connected to a link to the zoom meeting. I think whoever's name you are able to click on and join the meeting, that is your TA for discussion.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Dec 12, 2020 4:54 pm
Forum: Amphoteric Compounds
Topic: Textbook Question 6A.17
Replies: 3
Views: 34

Re: Textbook Question 6A.17

Metal oxides contain ionic bonds so they will split into ions in water BaO into Ba2+ and O2-, and that O2- causes water to be basic. Nonmetal oxides mostly stays in water as a single molecule, you don't see SO3 splits into S6+ and O2-, and SO3 can accept more electrons, therefore it makes an acid.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Dec 12, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Aqua vs Hydrate
Replies: 12
Views: 83

Re: Aqua vs Hydrate

Claire_Kim_2F wrote:What happens if it is anionic is it still aqua or would it be aquate?

It will still be aqua, -ate is only added to the end of metal name if the complex is an anion.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Dec 12, 2020 4:42 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg equation
Replies: 4
Views: 27

Re: Rydberg equation

It's always the final energy state minus the starting energy state. If the electron is raised to a higher energy level, n1 will be greater than n2; if the electron emits light and falls back to a lower energy level, n1 will be smaller than n2.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Thu Dec 10, 2020 8:36 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: AX3E2
Replies: 7
Views: 60

Re: AX3E2

I still don't quite understand why the molecule will form T-shape instead of trigonal planar. I know that if there is one lone pair it will form seesaw because the electrons don't want to be at axial forming three 90 degree bonds with atoms, but when there are two lone pairs won't they try to stay f...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Dec 09, 2020 12:07 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Lecture Videos Not Playing [ENDORSED]
Replies: 16
Views: 128

Re: Lecture Videos Not Playing [ENDORSED]

The lectures are working for me now but not before 11am. I guess it's due to some problems of ccle and we just need to watch the lectures when we can :)
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 8:35 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Effect of Electronegativity on the Strength of Acids
Replies: 4
Views: 50

Re: Effect of Electronegativity on the Strength of Acids

Is the acid itself being more electronegative make it a stronger acid or is it the conjugate base ? This is where equilibrium comes into play, a more electronegative atom means the proton will more likely to break off, and whether that proton stays with water or bind back to the atom is also up to ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 8:28 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Negative pH of acid
Replies: 16
Views: 68

Re: Negative pH of acid

It is possible if the molarity of hydrogen ion is greater than 1. If you have 5M HCl solution, -log(5)=-0.7
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 6:33 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Number and Regions of density
Replies: 8
Views: 43

Re: Coordination Number and Regions of density

Coordination numbers are numbers of bounds the central metal formed in a coordination compound; regions of electron density is different, it is used while determining the molecule shape therefore electron lone pairs also count as regions of density.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 6:23 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Lectures not loading
Replies: 13
Views: 90

Re: Lectures not loading

The lectures was working for me around 5:30pm but suddenly stopped loading. Now it is just showing error code.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Dec 06, 2020 6:18 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Thoughts on Switching Majors?
Replies: 30
Views: 240

Re: Thoughts on Switching Majors?

A tip if you are thinking about switching into a different life science major. I am currently in biology major and my department counselor strongly suggested me to think about changing major after taking LS7ABC. LS7 series was basically an intro class to biology which corresponds to different topics...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 5:17 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: EDTA example in 11/25 lecture
Replies: 5
Views: 63

Re: EDTA example in 11/25 lecture

Thank you Silvi, that is an excellent visual aid and it helps a lot for me to imagine the interaction!
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 5:12 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelating Ligands
Replies: 2
Views: 17

Re: Chelating Ligands

Dr Lavelle mentioned in the lecture that a common structure for bidentate molecules is a lone pair + two spacing atoms + another lone pair. In the example of EDTA4-, if you choose lone pair on nitrogen as the first lone pair, then tracing the structure with spacing atoms(2 carbon), you will find ano...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:33 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Lecture #23
Replies: 13
Views: 115

Re: Lecture #23

Yes, the electrons in unhybridized 2p orbitals are delocalized; those delocalized electrons form delocalized pi bonds perpendicular to the molecule. Essentially delocalized pi bonds will only appear when there are resonance structures for molecules which involves double or triple bonds.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:26 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization orbitals
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: hybridization orbitals

it depends on its ground state electron configuration. Since C ends at 2p. the hybridization orbital is 2sp Is the hybridization of ground state C 2sp because of the 2 electrons in the 2p shell? If it is could someone explain why because I thought the other valence electrons of C could still contri...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:08 am
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization of phosphorus (Sapling Q.11)
Replies: 21
Views: 96

Re: hybridization of phosphorus (Sapling Q.11)

Like most people have mentioned, double bond still counts as one region of electron density in hybridization. Also don't forget lone pairs as region of electron density as well.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:20 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Determining polar molecules
Replies: 7
Views: 50

Re: Determining polar molecules

Yes, if the molecule is symmetrical then it is nonpolar regardless of the difference in electronegativity. However, you do need to make sure that the atoms attached to the central molecule are all the same. CHCl3 is in a tetrahedral shape which is considered symmetrical, but the dipole moments does ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:16 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization
Replies: 7
Views: 47

Re: Hybridization

Do the electrons in hybrid orbitals have different properties/characteristics compared to electrons in their normal orbitals? Will hybridized electrons behave differently? Also, does hybridization and the mixing of orbitals affect the shape of an atom or molecule? Electrons are electrons and they d...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:11 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization General Question
Replies: 2
Views: 14

Re: Hybridization General Question

I'm going to use this answer I provided for a similar question about hybridization. Like Dr. Lavelle mentioned at the very end of the lecture, we find out the shape of the molecule through VSEPR model first and then use hybridization to explain the bond in that shape. In the case for carbon, we foun...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:29 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Net Vector
Replies: 4
Views: 21

Re: Net Vector

Yes, the net vector is the end product of all the vectors combined in a molecule. It is the vector that ultimately matters and will lead an overall effect on the molecule. Just like net weight you see on a bag of chip, the total weight of that bag of chip is 200g, but the bag is 20g, therefore the n...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Fri Nov 20, 2020 9:22 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization
Replies: 7
Views: 47

Re: Hybridization

Like Dr. Lavelle mentioned at the very end of the lecture, we find out the shape of the molecule through VSEPR model first and then use hybridization to explain the bond in that shape. In this case for carbon, we found that there needs to be 4 sigma bonds distributed all equally around carbon so we ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 8:21 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Sapling Weeks 5/6 HW #18
Replies: 7
Views: 58

Re: Sapling Weeks 5/6 HW #18

The potential energy of london dispersion force is directly proportional to the polarizability of an atom. And the polarizability of an atom is related to the size of the atom. Larger atoms means the outer electrons are more loosely held, therefore they can be polarized more easily to create a tempo...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 8:10 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Formal Charge vs. Oxidation number vs. Bond Length
Replies: 3
Views: 17

Re: Formal Charge vs. Oxidation number vs. Bond Length

I definitely agree with the explanations that have been posted, oxidation number is usually not a good way to determine the resonance structure because it is treating a bond as if the bond is completely ionic: the more electronegative atom will get a -1 charge, and the less electronegative atom will...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 15, 2020 7:55 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Drawing the lone pairs on the central atom
Replies: 5
Views: 45

Re: Drawing the lone pairs on the central atom

We definitely need to consider electron lone pairs while determining the shape of a molecule, the shape of NH3 molecule is actually trigonal pyramidal because the electron lone pair will push the other bond away. 4 electron pairs are distributed as a tetrahedral shape, but since one of them is lone ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Nov 14, 2020 10:44 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrocarbons
Replies: 3
Views: 17

Re: Hydrocarbons

You can definitely use all these terms interchangeably and there is nothing special about the hydrocarbons. I think professor prefer induced dipole-induced dipole because it actually describes what is going on to create the attraction, instead of just showing someone's last name :)
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Nov 14, 2020 10:37 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Effect of size on IMF and intramolecular
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: Effect of size on IMF and intramolecular

For intermolecular force, larger size means more electrons can be polarized, leading to a greater induced dipole-induced dipole attraction (At room temperature, I2 is solid, F2 is gas). For intramolecular force, larger size means longer bond length, leading to a weaker bond strength (HF bond is stro...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:37 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Silver Halides
Replies: 5
Views: 16

Re: Silver Halides

This is a great example of how ionic bond containing characteristic of covalent bond due to polarization since you will expect ionic compound to dissolve in water and covalent compound don't. The result of this experiment is also easily observed as you see obvious difference in solubility in test tu...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:25 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: London dispersion forces
Replies: 12
Views: 55

Re: London dispersion forces

I totally agree with all the explanations that have been posted, just to make things clearer: London dispersion force is caused by the temporary polarization of the electron in atoms, therefore the more electrons an atom has a stronger London dispersion force it will possess, which means that the bi...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:15 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Electron spin
Replies: 12
Views: 47

Re: Electron spin

Like most people have said the electron spin is not found by the mathematical equation. In fact it was a property that is not confirmed until the experiment of electron beam passing through the magnet. The scientist found that when an beam of electron passes through the magnet it splits into two, on...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Nov 04, 2020 8:43 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Structure
Replies: 7
Views: 49

Re: Lewis Structure

If you are still unsure, you could compare the formal charge when the atoms are placed differently. what do you mean by comparing the formal charge when the atoms are placed differently? For example if you have a CO2 molecule, putting an O in the middle and forming two double bonds on both sides wi...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Nov 04, 2020 8:32 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic Bonding Question
Replies: 6
Views: 58

Re: Ionic Bonding Question

Yes, ionic bonds are typically formed by elements from two sides of the periodic table. Different types of bonds between atoms are determined by their difference in electronegativity, halogens usually have very high electronegativity so they gain electrons and metals have low electronegativity there...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 01, 2020 8:53 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Midterm Question
Replies: 11
Views: 166

Re: Midterm Question

Karen Elrayes 1L wrote:We don't need to do any problems from section topic 1C right?

Nothing for 1C, for testing topics and textbook problems related to each topic there is an outline on Dr. Lavelle's Chemistry 14A website under "learning outcomes".
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 01, 2020 8:45 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Sapling Question (Bohr and Broglie Models of Electrons)
Replies: 4
Views: 63

Re: Sapling Question (Bohr and Broglie Models of Electrons)

Basically 2 things you're looking for in each wave:
1. The frequency and amplitude need to be constant
2. In the given segment of wave it must complete whole number of cycles (each cycle is where it begins to repeat itself)
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Nov 01, 2020 8:38 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Dimensional Analysis
Replies: 7
Views: 72

Re: Dimensional Analysis

Dimensional analysis is basically writing out all the units for numbers during calculation and trying to cancel them out at the end. It always starts with a "start unit", the unit you are given in problem; and it ends with the "end unit", the unit of the answer you are looking fo...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Fri Oct 30, 2020 2:28 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: intermolecular vs intramolecular
Replies: 17
Views: 298

Re: intermolecular vs intramolecular

Intramolecular bonds are bonds within a single molecule, in others words it is bond between atoms which forms that one molecule. Intermolecular bonds are attraction forces between two molecules, a classic example will be Hydrogen bond: a hydrogen atom attracting to an electronegative atom from anoth...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Fri Oct 30, 2020 2:05 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Nonpolar and polar
Replies: 16
Views: 278

Re: Nonpolar and polar

Whether a bond is polar covalent or nonpolar covalent or iconic can be determined by the difference in electronegativity between the atoms. Typically less than 0.5 is nonpolar, between 0.5 and 2 is polar covalent, greater than 2 is ionic. The electronegativity value of elements can be found easily b...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 9:19 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Conceptual understanding of the photoelectric experiment
Replies: 5
Views: 57

Re: Conceptual understanding of the photoelectric experiment

My TA said for concept about the topics just understand everything Dr. Lavelle mentioned in class lecture. If you are reading extra information from the book then it is good for further understanding but they won't be applied to specific question on the exam.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 9:13 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg Equation and Negative Signs
Replies: 11
Views: 88

Re: Rydberg Equation and Negative Signs

Yes, it still stay positive and wavelength is always positive. Think about the problem in this way: electron loses energy while dropping from a higher number of n to a lower one, therefore the energy is negative for electrons; the light that got emitted gains energy from the electron, therefore the ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Oct 25, 2020 9:05 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg Equation and Negative Signs
Replies: 11
Views: 88

Re: Rydberg Equation and Negative Signs

If you're plugging in the energy to solve for other components then you should use the same sign that is given by the problem. The number n and frequency v is always positive in the answer.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Oct 21, 2020 2:19 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: dx^2-y^2 orbital
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Re: dx^2-y^2 orbital

Pranav Daggubati 1A wrote:I think that its because the orbital is very similar looking to a hyperbolic functions

My mistake! I do find in other videos that people call it "x square minus y square" orbital, I think you are right about it has something to do with the hyperbolic function.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Oct 21, 2020 2:02 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: dx^2-y^2 orbital
Replies: 4
Views: 38

Re: dx^2-y^2 orbital

I don't see any reason why the y should be negative in the orbital expression. I'm believe that it is just a dash connecting x^2 and y^2 to indicate them being a term together. dxy orbital locates in-between axis and dx^2-y^2 orbital locates along the x and y axis.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:49 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Energy Levels
Replies: 11
Views: 92

Re: Energy Levels

I am still confused by electron skipping energy levels. To put in the context of orbital, if an electron is excited from level 1 to level 4, does it travels through p and d orbital and finally enter the f orbital, or it goes straight from s orbital to f orbital.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sun Oct 18, 2020 2:34 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: m vs nm
Replies: 66
Views: 434

Re: m vs nm

I will assume that as long as the problem does not specify, we can use which ever makes more sense in the context of the problem. For me personally I like to use nm only for wavelength that are in or fairly close to the visible region. Also most of the questions will be online in form of multiple ch...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Fri Oct 16, 2020 1:09 pm
Forum: *Black Body Radiation
Topic: What is Black Body?
Replies: 35
Views: 565

Re: What is Black Body?

A black body is not really black, in fact you can never see it because it absorbs the lights of all frequencies and nothing will be reflected into your eyes. We call it a "black" body simply because black is the color that absorbs all the visible lights in our daily life which best resembl...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:56 am
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric effect
Replies: 9
Views: 108

Re: Photoelectric effect

Just like you stated in the question, increasing frequency increases energy per photon according to E = hv. Increasing intensity only increases number of photon which does increase the total energy of the light beam. However, as long as individual photon doesn't have enough energy to knock out the e...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:45 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic Spectra Lecture question
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: Atomic Spectra Lecture question

Yes, the energy required for each element to excite its electron from ground state to the next level is different. There are different numbers of protons in different atom of elements. As the proton number increases, the attraction between proton and its electron also increases which gives each elem...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Oct 10, 2020 3:29 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: What Value to Use for Sig Figs
Replies: 4
Views: 25

Re: What Value to Use for Sig Figs

If the calculation is addition in the first case your will round to one decimal place 5.9 + 8.79 = 14.7 because 5.9 has one decimal place, and 8.79 has two decimal places(round to the least decimal number). For multiplication you need to count the total sig fig of each number in the given problem an...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Oct 10, 2020 3:08 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Electromagnetic Spectrum
Replies: 7
Views: 55

Re: Electromagnetic Spectrum

Wavelength decreases as you move from color red to color purple(700nm - 400nm). They are all classified as visible light and only takes up a very small part of the EM Spectrum which is between 1 micrometer to 100 nanometer. In the lecture the EM spectrum includes other lights as well and their wavel...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Oct 10, 2020 2:52 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Sapling HW Question
Replies: 2
Views: 67

Re: Sapling HW Question

Totally agree with Arti's explanation, the key to solving this problem is to find the mass of C and H atoms first in order to determine how much O is involved in this reaction. The rest of the problem just becomes finding the molecular formula after knowing the empirical formula.
by Yichen Fan 3A
Sat Oct 10, 2020 2:42 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Temperature
Replies: 14
Views: 111

Re: Temperature

Kelvin(K) is the SI base unit for temperature; therefore, it is most commonly used in scientific context such as experiment and formula. However, using something such as 298 degree is just very inconvenient for our life and that's why Celsius and Fahrenheit are introduced. Celsius uses the same scal...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Oct 07, 2020 10:12 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamentals G.25
Replies: 4
Views: 57

Re: Fundamentals G.25

Just a little to add to the explanations already posted. After 90 times of dilution, there will only be 8.1*10^-31 moles of x left in the solution of 10 ml. Remember for each mole of anything there are 6.02*10^23 molecules in it. Therefore, a solution with 8.1*10^-31 moles of x won't even has close ...
by Yichen Fan 3A
Wed Oct 07, 2020 9:53 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Sapling Textbook Access Code
Replies: 10
Views: 69

Re: Sapling Textbook Access Code

I heard it may take a few weeks for the store to get more access codes. Hopefully they will come before the end of our free trial.

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