Search found 69 matches

by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:53 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Week 2 Sapling Hw #2
Replies: 5
Views: 43

Re: Week 2 Sapling Hw #2

Percent Ionization =What you have made conjugate acid or base /initial base or acid *100. Therefore first you need to find all the ingredients for it. So first set up the equilibrium table and find the values. then plug them in. Hence, I look at it as a post percentage of how much was converted.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:43 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Le Chatelier's principle #9 week 2 HW
Replies: 4
Views: 23

Re: Le Chatelier's principle #9 week 2 HW

If we added more to the reactants it is basically the same just the initial amount would change. Set up the equation as normally and have the right initials and the math will be different because we have different numbers and R will be more than P. Hence, we will just get more product because R>P an...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:40 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Increase in Pressure
Replies: 15
Views: 43

Re: Increase in Pressure

It only applies to gasses so don't worry about in another context. Also, it follows the least moles. One of the crazier ideas is if the moles are the same is that there is no direct change rather it just decrease equally.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:34 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Quotient
Replies: 12
Views: 421

Re: Quotient

Q is basically K at a time of the reaction that is not an equilibrium. Use the term Q to basically indicate that it is not at equilibrium. Therefore, they are entirely the same, it helps to describe the state of the reaction.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:33 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Kw equation
Replies: 9
Views: 47

Re: Kw equation

in a short way, Kw is the Kc when water breaks down into H30 and OH. Therefore, this is extremely important. It creates the PH and POH scale it also allows us to convert from KA to KB and visa versa when we need it. SO therefore it is very important and it defines the whole base and acids concepts. ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:26 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Endothermic vs Exothermic
Replies: 7
Views: 20

Re: Endothermic vs Exothermic

Yes, delta H is a perfect and most direct way to tell if it's endothermic or exothermic. endothermic being negative(absorbed) and exothermic positive(released). Another way to tell is where the heat is. If heat is in the product then it's exothermic and if it's a reactant it's endothermic.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 17, 2021 11:18 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: q vs k
Replies: 62
Views: 162

Re: q vs k

Yeah, q will eventually become K. Q is the product and reaction ratio at a certain time of the reaction. However, as we can infer that it takes a while to get to K. so q is the intermediate until we reach it. Therefore, Q is just a notion of a certain time before it hits K.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 10, 2021 7:39 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Adding more of only one reactant
Replies: 4
Views: 39

Re: Adding more of only one reactant

In terms of the formula, k=P/R. So, as you increase R It would increase P. However I would also like to know whether two reactants play a role as we learned limiting reactions in 14a. However, my basic understanding is that as long as R as a whole increase so P will decrease to balance
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 10, 2021 7:10 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Change in Pressure
Replies: 9
Views: 38

Re: Change in Pressure

Not every time does a change in pressure mean a change in concentration, only when compressed or expanded. We Can agree that concentration is made by n/V which means it is dependent on moles and volume. If we compress the system we are changing the pressure but we are also changing the volume. This ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 10, 2021 6:52 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Direction of a non-equilibrium reaction
Replies: 11
Views: 56

Re: Direction of a non-equilibrium reaction

I learned this in LS7A but it has to do with the amount of product and reactants and le chalifer principal. So if Q is really big we have a lot of product. We know from le chalifer that the reaction wants to be at equilibrium. So, it must adapt and produce the reverse so it returns to its stable sta...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 10, 2021 6:47 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: K=1
Replies: 8
Views: 49

Re: K=1

K=1 means that reactants and products literally have the same concentration. Lavalle describes this as rare because think about how rare that has to be that they are perfectly the same, and in terms of the reaction, it is hard for the reaction to flow and create a product or vice versa. Also, means ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 10, 2021 6:37 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Increasing the Yield of the Product.
Replies: 5
Views: 23

Re: Increasing the Yield of the Product.

The Le chandelier principles basically are trying to readjust back to normal. So if you remove the product, then there is an imbalance and it is key to remember there are still reactants. So, we still need to obtain that K ratio value, and the K value is constant. So, the product formation is favore...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Jan 10, 2021 6:24 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Kc vs Kp
Replies: 109
Views: 913

Re: Kc vs Kp

Well to begin it has to be said that Kc refers to concentration and Kp is referring to pressure. With that, the first note is that Kp sorely can be used for gases. Whereas, Kc can be used universally. so one asks when do you pick which one? Well, remember it is based on the equation states and what ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:24 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Acidic, basic, or neutral?
Replies: 8
Views: 72

Re: Acidic, basic, or neutral?

I think the main way to focus on the equation that makes the salt. So, for example, NaCl is made of NaOH and HCl strong base and acid so they cancel to be neutral. As for the others if we have a strong acid and weak basic is a acid salt and another is a if a strong base and weak acid therefore, its ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:22 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Titration Graphs
Replies: 6
Views: 70

Re: Titration Graphs

I would focus on the stiochemistry point on the graph and why it matters.This point will tell you what type of acids and base you have and the ph of the overall solution.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 11:00 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Hemoglobin vs. Myoglobin
Replies: 29
Views: 221

Re: Hemoglobin vs. Myoglobin

The huge difference between the two is that hemoglobin is 4 myoglobin complexes which 1 myoglobin is one heme structure. Therefore, hemoglobin can carry 4 oxygen because it has 4 heme structures. Whereas, the myoglobin can only carry one O2. Hence, there is 4 histones and 4 o2 on the hemoglobin. The...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:41 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: question about cisplatin
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Re: question about cisplatin

I think it is key to note that the NH3 on the cisplatin has already filled its self and doesn't have any lone pairs or space for it binds. Therefore, when we look at the Cl- we have 3 pairs of lone pairs on both and its is also has a dipole movement. Hence, it is more likely that we bind at this sit...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:28 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Neutral Salts
Replies: 7
Views: 55

Re: Neutral Salts

How I like to think of neutral charts is to think of the things that made the salt so I work backward. SO for example, NaCl is a neutral salt. How would I know if it's neutral I'm gonna make the acid and the base that makes the salt. Hence, we have a strong base of NaOH and a strong HCL. How do I kn...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:17 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Titration
Replies: 4
Views: 23

Re: Titration

So Titrations are not usually known before, Like we said we use it to see if it balanced, acid or basic. We are focusing on that stoichiometric point, Which means that the two moles of bases and acids are the same. This will let you know if the sample is acid or basic. Furthermore, it can help in th...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:07 pm
Forum: Identifying Acidic & Basic Salts
Topic: Sapling HW 10 Question 11
Replies: 6
Views: 44

Re: Sapling HW 10 Question 11

So, because the oxo-acids have the H attached to the O and not the halogen this causes a great difference in the stability of the molecule. Therefore, we look at the induction - which is the spread of the charge across the anion: which I really mean is the stability of the anion. It is key to note t...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 9:55 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Why is CO (carbon monoxide) monodentate?
Replies: 6
Views: 46

Re: Why is CO (carbon monoxide) monodentate?

CO is monodentate for many reasons to begin with the structure of CO-. Its one lone pair on C with a triple bond and a lone pair on O. Therefore, the O is negatively charged. Hence, since the structure is only 2 molecules long there are not enough spacers. Usually, you need 2 spacers because it woul...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Tue Dec 15, 2020 9:50 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Ligand use -ate
Replies: 18
Views: 108

Re: Ligand use -ate

The suffix -ate is used in the case that the whole complex of the coordination compound is actually negative. Therefore, its anions and hence it will commonly be found at the end of a compound. I say this because the anions are followed after cations. For example Na Cl- therefore, cations than anion...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:26 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Sapling Week 9
Replies: 6
Views: 47

Re: Sapling Week 9

You are right in a way. Octahedral is the most common coordination number 6 geometry for most. The hexagonal planner is not common in most structures because the repulsion is not great for it is a regular structure so that's why it gets ruled out. The others are not coordination number 6 they are 5....
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:14 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Sapling 5
Replies: 6
Views: 46

Re: Sapling 5

yeah for sure, this question is a little tricky in the sense that you have to know you ligands. SO we have 2 different ligands en and we have two of them and we have two CO. For this problem it seems like oh there is simply a coordination number of 4 but wait. En is bidentate so we have to add 2 for...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:07 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Tips for Coordination #
Replies: 4
Views: 19

Re: Tips for Coordination #

the coordination number is just the number of bonds that the TM has made. So, for your example when we check the we see that next to the TM we have a ligand with F4 so the 4 monodentate ligands make 4 bonds so the coordination bond is 4. It is key to check that they are not bidentate or polydentate ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:03 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: "(en)" Sapling
Replies: 19
Views: 108

Re: "(en)" Sapling

En is a ligand which is the short name for ethylenediamine. The key thing to remember here is that ethylenediamine or en is bidentate. Therefore, when counting for coordination number count this as 2 ligands. Confusing but check out the ligand page Lavalle has it helps a lot.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:01 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Hemoglobin
Replies: 12
Views: 226

Re: Hemoglobin

Hemoglobin is used in our blood to transfer oxygen and myoglobin is used in our muscles to transfer o2 too. Hence, both are made of the same structure the heme structure with the same protein and 02 Hence, one is just more complex than the other. For example, the hemoglobin is 4 myoglobin which comm...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Dec 06, 2020 10:57 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Hemoglobin Subunits
Replies: 3
Views: 50

Re: Hemoglobin Subunits

I think the best way of thinking of this in this class. Is that the heme structure, the histine, and the oxygen make the complete complex of myoglobin. Therefore, it answer your question the protein is attached to the bottom of the Fe so it is part of the heme structure in a way. So the 4 NH3 and o2...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 29, 2020 11:11 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of Carbon
Replies: 10
Views: 81

Re: Hybridization of Carbon

comes from the fact there are four bonds that can be made from carbon and therefore, there are 4 regions of electron density. This correlates to sp^3 because it's a combination of 1s and 3p's which makes 4 regions. Likewise, with the other 2 regions is sp and 3 regions would be sp^2. 4 regions goes ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: sigma vs pi bonds
Replies: 33
Views: 185

Re: sigma vs pi bonds

Sigma is a correlation of one bond. It is also one bond in the double bond and so in always one sigma bond. Furthermore, pi bonds are the spots onwards on the double bonds and triple. the big difference is that sigma bonds can rotate by the feature of them being tied in less rigid way in comparison ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:40 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: hybridization of phosphorus (Sapling Q.11)
Replies: 21
Views: 96

Re: hybridization of phosphorus (Sapling Q.11)

Hi! This is another part of Sapling Q.11. I understood how your answers applied to the other diagram, but this diagram threw me for a loop. If any of you have advice on how to better understand and complete these questions it would be much appreciated! Thank you! for this one there are multiple str...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:37 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: sapling #11
Replies: 11
Views: 64

Re: sapling #11

the most prevalent hybridization is the regions of electron density which stems from lone pairs and bonding regions. If you ask for hints it gives you a really good chart that explains which hybridization matches with which orbitals. 2 region---> sp 3 region---> sp^2 4 region---> sp^3 5 region---> s...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:30 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Lecture #23
Replies: 13
Views: 115

Re: Lecture #23

yes, it is delocalized. I think of it as for the sake of the structure having multiple figures for the double bonds. The overall bond lengths for one of the bonds in each of the carbons have to be different from the rest of the hybridized other bonds. Therefore, these represent that pi bond in the d...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 29, 2020 4:27 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Single Bonds and Sigma Bonds
Replies: 23
Views: 111

Re: Single Bonds and Sigma Bonds

Every covalent bonding region has a sigma bond. This is to also add that one bond in a double bond is a single bond and the other is sigma. Also, there is no difference rather it describes the character of a single bond. It also can rotate, unlike PI bonds.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:41 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Ionic radius
Replies: 18
Views: 114

Re: Ionic radius

yeah, iconic radius is dependent on a charge. Think of it as when something is a more negative or more negative charge that means there are more electrons in it. Also, in iconic compounds. Follow the trend lavelle gave us that bigger molecules are going to have more radius so as we move down on the ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:36 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Polarity
Replies: 30
Views: 152

Re: Polarity

yes, this is very common and it has to do with dipole movements. An easy one is C02. co bonds are polar bonds. but for co2 its two double bonds on either side of the c. Hence, they both move their dipole towards the c so the movement is actually counteracting each other and therefore, it is even and...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:34 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Phosphate
Replies: 7
Views: 37

Re: Phosphate

Phosphate can have an extended octet because it is the first row of p block before the introduction of the 3d block. Therefore, it is open to be used. Hence, that is why phosphorus and elements in the p block below the 3 p are able to open and sue the 3d block. Also, it is low energy so it's not too...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:24 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Expanded Octets
Replies: 11
Views: 85

Re: Expanded Octets

Yeah, they can a common one is S. S is commonly seen with over 10 valence electrons. SF6 has 12 electrons on the one sulfur molecule and it is seen to be found and a molecule so yes.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 22, 2020 11:22 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: How to determine which molecule is more ionic?
Replies: 11
Views: 106

Re: How to determine which molecule is more ionic?

to figure out which is more iconic it depends on what the molecule is made out of. For example, more iconic is going to have smaller anions like fluorine because they are less covalent and more negative charges. Whereas, for cations, they are gonna be bigger such as K instead of NA because the small...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:45 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Boiling/Melting Points
Replies: 15
Views: 112

Re: Boiling/Melting Points

For melting and boiling points lavelle talked about polarizability being the main factor. So, the common element that add to polarizability is the size of the molecule. So when you compare two elements look at the size. when I mean size atomic radius is a key trend or number of electrons.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:40 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Sapling W 5/6 #17
Replies: 10
Views: 108

Re: Sapling W 5/6 #17

I think a big part of the question has to do with polarity. Therefore, it has to be shown that if you its polar it can make the dipole connections. SO there no polar molecules that are likely to have only London. And London happens in all molecules so the answers are BCL Br2 and c2h6
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:37 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Sapling #13 Hydrogen Bonds
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: Sapling #13 Hydrogen Bonds

Hey, I think the point of focus is on the lone pairs. You were right about the other pairs being possible but the two you may the miss were the lone pair on nitrogen and the 2 lone pairs on oxygen. I missed this part too. It also depends on lone pairs. Since, o has 2 there are two bonds that can for...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:29 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Sapling #9 week 5/6
Replies: 13
Views: 92

Re: Sapling #9 week 5/6

I also found this idea questionable. I had a very hard time. However, the best way to think of it is we are trying to minimize the formal charge to create a neutral atom. So, with resonance, the best way to get the best answer is by having the lowest formal charge more neutral more stable more likel...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 15, 2020 10:26 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Exceptions for electron configuration
Replies: 3
Views: 38

Re: Exceptions for electron configuration

I think for this question it is very important to remember that there are certain rules that must be remembered. One of which is the energy levels the D block has more energy than the s block therefore, when we fill the d block rather than filling the s block the element becomes more stable. Similar...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:43 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Fluorine
Replies: 7
Views: 40

Re: Fluorine

Since fluorine has 7 electrons it has a uncatering ability to get to that filled valence electrons therefore, it battles for that extra one electron and is willing to go the mile to get it, it makes sense that it wants that last electron. Also it for that sake it has the highest in its column becaus...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:41 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Why do we use formal charge?
Replies: 14
Views: 115

Re: Why do we use formal charge?

Thank you for posting this after reading Chem mods discussion this is what I retain because I am also having a hard time understanding. That formal charge is due to the stability of the element/molecule. hence, the FC is to be lowered for the sake of stability. And formal charge gives certain charac...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:35 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Atomic Radius
Replies: 38
Views: 222

Re: Atomic Radius

Atomic radius decreases as we move to the right of the periodic table because more electrons we have a closer outer shell because of the attraction of the inner nuclear charge is increasing at the same right while the shielding of electrons is remaining the same so there is a short radius by a stron...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:27 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Sapling Question #3
Replies: 6
Views: 60

Re: Sapling Question #3

For a phosphate ion, the most important thing to remember is it breaks the common rules of the octate its has more than 8 electrons and can enter electrons into the d block for the sake of stability Therefore, it can break standard rules. Therefore, use that, Also other elements that due this are P ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 08, 2020 11:20 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Size of Bonds
Replies: 28
Views: 99

Re: Size of Bonds

I think this is a good idea to think about. So the difference between the double bond and single bonds is the number of electrons in the bond. 2 for single and 4 for double bonds. Therefore, with more electrons, there is a greater force of attraction to the atom center. Hence, the length of the bond...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:56 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: difference in p orbitals
Replies: 8
Views: 54

Re: difference in p orbitals

its a rule that we will fill all orbitals first before we double up on orbitals. In the p section, there is 3 orbitals. So he gives different variable names x, y, z which can coordinate with any of them. it is referred to as the hundi rule.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:50 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: sapling 13
Replies: 7
Views: 64

Re: sapling 13

For me, the best way to think of this is the shell all of a certain amount of electrons like 5d block holds 2 per 5 orbitals. Therefore, the periodic table is a really good place to count electrons because electrons match the atomic number. Also, Ml is one electron in an orbital. So my advice uses t...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:44 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Textbook 1E #1
Replies: 4
Views: 31

Re: Textbook 1E #1

Hey so here is what I got A) so since it moving into a higher energy bracket 1s to 2p that means that the energy will increase. B) we know that n is represented by the first number so 2p means n=2 not 1 C) so l is based off the n number so if n increased in part B then it will increase likewise in L...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:33 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: d orbitals
Replies: 17
Views: 97

Re: d orbitals

yeah so the d block is known for being 10 elements. So it easy to think of these questions as to the periodic table as a reference. SO the d block is 5 orbital because each orbital 2 electrons each and therefore, we get 10 electrons shown in the d block of the periodic table
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Nov 01, 2020 11:30 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Sapling #4
Replies: 8
Views: 75

Re: Sapling #4

So the work function is found using the basic equation Ek=ep-work function. So to E of the photon convert the frequency to energy as we have been doing with the e=hv. Then basic math. As we arrange the value to the correct spot. Then to get the photons remember E of the photon is J/Photon so when yo...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:49 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: HW problem #25
Replies: 4
Views: 55

Re: HW problem #25

Hey this one is weird but dont worry i got you. So since you are given wave length as stated in the problem the first step is to find the energy per photon which is e=hc/lamanda. Then for the electron the relationship we have for velocity of Electron is debroglies which we take the h/lamanda =mv. Al...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:40 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Sapling #5
Replies: 7
Views: 101

Re: Sampling #5

At first it not a usually problem we see but just think what we are given. We are given the energy in the water and wavelength in nm. SO first convert nm to m by mutiplying by 10^9. Then find the amount of energy per photon. E=hc/lamanda. Here we are given the joules/photon. Now we can divide the en...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:37 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Sapling hw #7
Replies: 2
Views: 36

Re: Sapling hw #7

Im going to walk you threw this conceptually. By the equation goes as E(electron)=E(photon)-work function. We are given the work function and they want to know the wave length. The longest wave length is going to be the least amount of energy need to emit this electron meaning that Kintic energy has...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:33 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: 1B.26
Replies: 3
Views: 39

Re: 1B.26

So the velocity uncertainty is 10? What if the value was given as 10 +- 0.04? What would be the velocity uncertainty then? If the values was 10+- .04 then our uncertainty would be the difference in the .04 *2 (for both postive and negative). Hence the uncertainty in the velocity would be .08. The i...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 25, 2020 11:30 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: n1 and n2
Replies: 15
Views: 56

Re: n1 and n2

Yeah so n1 is final and n2 is initial. A better way to remember it for me is the overall energy is derived from the equation change in E=E(final)-E(intial). Therefore the n1 comes from the final and by the way dont use the ryberg equation makes it harder on yourself.
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:57 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: HW 1a 7b
Replies: 4
Views: 34

Re: HW 1a 7b

This problem is simple rearrangement of the equation c=wavelength times frequency. Thus, to relate frequency to wavelength we get wavelength=c/v. so now we just plug in the wave length we got and then we get it in meters. From here we must convert m to picom. Which is 1m is 10^12 pico meters. so mul...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:30 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Sapling Week 2-4 HW Question 1
Replies: 8
Views: 82

Re: Sapling Week 2-4 HW Question 1

This question is very conceptual. The wave length and the frequency are both properties of light so no matter the number of photons this number is not going to change whether there are a thousand or million or one. This is the same idea that was presented on the phoetonic effect when they increased ...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:06 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module Question 28
Replies: 9
Views: 73

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module Question 28

Joules actually has Kg in it so we dont need to convert it. And Kg is the si unit of mass so we are good there. And yes the work function is not need because we are talking about Kinetic energy of the electron which only needs the mass of an electron and the velocity of it which were both given to u...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 18, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: 1B.15a DeBroglie or KE equation
Replies: 3
Views: 57

Re: 1B.15a DeBroglie or KE equation

i actually had the same question in my discussion this week. And yeah you don't use it for the sake of it being a good representation of wave.

I showed the work to incase you need directionality. you just need to find the electron mass which is a constant and rearrange the equation of lamada= h/p ;)
by rhettfarmer-3H
Sun Oct 18, 2020 4:29 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Post module #38
Replies: 3
Views: 34

Re: Post module #38

Hey, I like this problem. Quite simple as we get use to the equation. however, I agree to do this problem you must understand the constant of electron which is 9.11X10^-31 Kg. Furthermore, the equation goes as p=h/lamanda. We are luckily given the wave length which makes it easy since everything els...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Fri Oct 09, 2020 3:37 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: concentration of the solution
Replies: 6
Views: 67

Re: concentration of the solution

This problem demonstrates a little confusion because we have basically 2 problems that take place which causes 3 volume to be there. We have the first problem that is a simple M=n/v to give us the molarity for the second problem which is a MV=MV. Therefore, we see slight hardships. But first convert...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Fri Oct 09, 2020 1:59 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Week 1 Question 6 Help Sapling
Replies: 3
Views: 35

Re: Week 1 Question 6 Help Sapling

I just did the problem but yes i think you are on the right idea. Use the molar mass to be 125.556 g/mol. Convert from G to Moles. should get .03090255. Then from here we use M=n/v for our sake we need V=n/M. plugging in accordingly. we should V=.03090255 (from conversion)/(.880)
by rhettfarmer-3H
Fri Oct 09, 2020 12:44 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: L35 Fundamentals Textbook Problem
Replies: 2
Views: 51

Re: L35 Fundamentals Textbook Problem

oh wow, this is a long one. First balance the equation we are using. By doing so should look like Fe3Br8 + 4Na2CO3 =8NaBr +4CO2 +Fe3O4. We know we have 2.5 tons of NaBr so we must work backwards to Fe. Get out of tons. We want grams! So 1 ton is 10^6 grams. So convert. Then convert to moles so we ca...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Fri Oct 09, 2020 12:09 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Sapling Hw Week 1 #10
Replies: 20
Views: 283

Re: Sapling Hw Week 1 #10

Hey, so to start this problem there is some information you have to find: the molar mass of both 2-butanone and 3-methyl-3hexanol which ill give as 72.11 and 116.2. Granted they also give a density for me it was .81g/ml might be different. But I attach my work. To explain, convert the ML of butanone...
by rhettfarmer-3H
Fri Oct 09, 2020 11:54 am
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: L.39 Textbook question
Replies: 3
Views: 54

Re: L.39 Textbook question

I also found this problem troublesome. The start is tough and there is enough information that is extra and very irrelevant or can be discard after a quick subtraction. Furthermore, I attached my work that follows the steps first get the amount of product by subtracting the mass of the crucible and ...

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