Search found 40 matches

by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:36 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Axial and Equatorial atoms
Replies: 6
Views: 27

Re: Axial and Equatorial atoms

I also had this same question. I believe that axial atoms are ones that form about a 90º angle; equatorial atoms are ones that form an angle smaller than 90º. However, what I'm confused on is whether the angle is to the central atom or to another molecule.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:29 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: CH3F Molecular Shape
Replies: 7
Views: 29

Re: CH3F Molecular Shape

Since the radius of F is much larger than that of H, it would take up more space and therefore push the other H molecules closer together.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:27 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Shape of XeF2
Replies: 2
Views: 22

Re: Shape of XeF2

The two lone pairs on top of the Xe would push the Xe-F bonds into a liner position, and that one remaining lone pair would be on the bottom!
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:21 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bonds in depictions of molecular shape
Replies: 3
Views: 14

Re: Bonds in depictions of molecular shape

Yes, I believe that is correct. This website says the same thing too: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/wedge-and-dash.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:19 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Polar and non polar elements
Replies: 9
Views: 32

Re: Polar and non polar elements

Yes, I would say it is possible. For example, in the molecule CH3O, the three C-H bonds would be considered nonpolar, and the C-O bond would be considered polar. Whether or not the whole molecule is polar depends on the symmetry of the polar bonds.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 22, 2020 7:17 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: BOND ANGLES FOR CERTAIN MOLECULAR SHAPES
Replies: 4
Views: 20

Re: BOND ANGLES FOR CERTAIN MOLECULAR SHAPES

Bond angles are basically the space between each individual bond; they can be affected by lone pairs, number of molecules, and many other factors. As Catie said, however, it isn't the best idea to just memorize the angles because they might not always be the same, even in two molecules with the same...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:23 am
Forum: Interionic and Intermolecular Forces (Ion-Ion, Ion-Dipole, Dipole-Dipole, Dipole-Induced Dipole, Dispersion/Induced Dipole-Induced Dipole/London Forces, Hydrogen Bonding)
Topic: Interaction potential energy application?
Replies: 2
Views: 12

Re: Interaction potential energy application?

When I went to Justin's workshop today, he just said that you just need to know the equation conceptually and what it means in terms of polarizability.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:20 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: nuclear charge vs effective nuclear charge
Replies: 1
Views: 14

Re: nuclear charge vs effective nuclear charge

Nuclear charge is, as the name says, the charge of the nucleus (basically the protons); effective nuclear charge takes into account the effect of electrons on nuclear charge (nuclear charge minus the number of core electrons). Nuclear charge increases with the number of protons, so it increases acro...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:11 am
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Predicting elements based on ionization energy
Replies: 2
Views: 7

Re: Predicting elements based on ionization energy

Ionization energy is the amount of energy it takes to remove an electron. It increases across a period and up a column (meaning it is the greatest in the top right of the periodic table). The reason it increases across a period is because there's more valence electrons in the shell, meaning that the...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:04 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Central atom in NH4Cl
Replies: 7
Views: 24

Re: Central atom in NH4Cl

I also agree that they'd be drawn separately. However, as a general rule, the least electronegative atom is usually the one in the middle. Also, based on the way the molecule is written, the first atom tends to be the central one; basically, the way the molecule is written is also a clue about how t...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 15, 2020 12:01 am
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Confusion on Potential Resonance Structure Diagram
Replies: 6
Views: 15

Re: Confusion on Potential Resonance Structure Diagram

Hi! I'm not exactly sure about the dashed lines in this specific case, but I believe that you're right about them representing resonance. The "in-between" is essentially referring to the fact that when there is resonance, the bond length is in between two whole numbers. For example, when t...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:23 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Homework Problem 2A.11
Replies: 2
Views: 14

Re: Homework Problem 2A.11

For both of these, it is important to note that there will be a 4s 1 instead of a 4s 2 because this allows for the d orbital to be as stable as possible. (a) 3d 6 would initially be Fe, but since we take one of the electrons from 4s and essentially add it onto the d orbital, this electron configurat...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:17 am
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Electronegativity vs. Electron Affinity
Replies: 8
Views: 34

Re: Electronegativity vs. Electron Affinity

Electronegativity is how well an atom can attract an electron. Electron affinity is the energy released when an electron is attracted. They are very related, but this is the slight difference
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:15 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Homework Problem 2A.13
Replies: 1
Views: 13

Re: Homework Problem 2A.13

(a) Zn has a full 3d orbital, which is extremely stable. Therefore, when removing an electron, it would be removed from the next shell, which in this case would be the 4s orbital. (b) The electron configuration of Cl ends in the 3p orbital. Therefore, to remove an electron, it would be removed from ...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:09 am
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Homework Problem 2A.1
Replies: 2
Views: 18

Re: Homework Problem 2A.1

Hi Talia! Sb has 5 valence electrons because valence electrons are those in the outermost shell that are able to bond. If we go off of the electron configuration for Sb, we would have [Kr]4d 10 5s 2 5p 3 . The valence shell in this case is 5, which has 2+3 (or 5) valence electrons. The reason it isn...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Nov 08, 2020 1:05 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence Electrons vs. Outer Electrons
Replies: 4
Views: 26

Re: Valence Electrons vs. Outer Electrons

Hi Stella, I believe there is a difference when it's outer shell electron vs. valence electrons. Outer shell electrons refer to all the electrons in the outermost shell of that atom, so for example, copper would have 2+6+10=18 outer shell electrons. However, valence electrons refer to the electrons...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sat Oct 31, 2020 8:29 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Atomic radii
Replies: 2
Views: 20

Re: Atomic radii

Going down a group would increase the atomic radii more because you're adding a whole new energy level (a new shell). Going across a period decreases the atomic radii because of the attractions between the electrons in the valence shell and the protons in the nucleus; although it does decrease the a...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sat Oct 31, 2020 8:26 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Periodic Table & Electron Affinity
Replies: 11
Views: 39

Re: Periodic Table & Electron Affinity

The main goal of elements regarding electrons is that they want to achieve a full valence shell (all the electrons they can have in their last energy level) to be stable. If the element is towards the right side of the periodic table, that means it has more electrons in its valence shell, so it's ea...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sat Oct 31, 2020 8:11 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Ionization Energy
Replies: 3
Views: 18

Re: Ionization Energy

It is important to note that the second ionization energy of an atom won't always be a lot bigger than the first ionization energy; it depends on the identity of the element. The basic idea is that, the closer the electron is to the nucleus of the atom, the more difficult it is to remove because the...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sat Oct 31, 2020 8:07 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: eV to Joules (Defining these Units) Question
Replies: 12
Views: 59

Re: eV to Joules (Defining these Units) Question

The definition of an electron volt is the amount of Ek that an electron gains by accelerating through a volt (in vacuum) of electric potential difference.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 30, 2020 12:44 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: 1E 25
Replies: 4
Views: 14

Re: 1E 25

I think what they're asking for is just the configuration of the valence shell (so, basically the last energy level, or the last n). I'm not sure though; this is a great question!
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Sun Oct 25, 2020 9:49 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: what can we have during the midterm?
Replies: 5
Views: 26

Re: what can we have during the midterm?

Dr. Lavelle linked in one of his emails an equation sheet and a periodic table that we should print out for the exam. This email was sent on October 21!
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:14 am
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: h/4pi
Replies: 7
Views: 60

Re: h/4pi

I agree with Ashley! When you plug pi into a calculator, it uses more than just 3.14 (it's easier to type in pi as well).
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:08 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Finding Formula of Unknown Molecule (Workshop)
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Finding Formula of Unknown Molecule (Workshop)

Here is how I would do it: 1) Find the moles of CO 2 and then use dimensional analysis to find the moles of C. 0 0.88g CO_{2} \times \frac{1 mol CO_{2}}{44.01 g CO_{2}} \times \frac{1 mol C}{1 mol CO_{2}} = 0.020 g C 2) Find the moles of H 2 O and then use dimensional analysis to find the moles of H...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 23, 2020 12:40 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic vs Molecular Spectroscopy
Replies: 2
Views: 12

Re: Atomic vs Molecular Spectroscopy

I believe that it's just regarding the difference between atoms and molecules, but I might be mistaken.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 23, 2020 12:37 am
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Amphetamine Formulas (Workshop Question)
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Re: Amphetamine Formulas (Workshop Question)

Going off what Jasmine said, the ratio between the empirical and molecular formula would be one. So, think of it as multiplying each subscript in the empirical formula by 1.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 23, 2020 12:34 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: question about circular wave model
Replies: 2
Views: 29

Re: question about circular wave model

I think the reason the peaks and troughs look different is because it is stretched into the circle. Imagine a slinky: when it's not stretched out, it looks like each "wave" is equal. However, when you stretch that slinky out into a circle, it sort of ends up looking like it's unequal.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:09 am
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Energy Gaps
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Re: Energy Gaps

The energy levels are basically the rings of an atom where the electron exists in. The smaller the energy level, the closer it is to the nucleus. Now, we know that the nucleus has protons in it. Since electrons and protons have opposite charges, their attraction is quite strong. The closer the energ...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Wed Oct 14, 2020 8:45 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic Spectra Lecture question
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: Atomic Spectra Lecture question

Does anyone have a video that will summarize the atomic spectra. I am very lost on this topic. https://youtu.be/oxtAeJL-iog This is a video from my high school AP Chem teacher that I referred back to for help with understanding this topic. I believe there are also good Crash Course and Bozeman Scie...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Wed Oct 14, 2020 8:41 pm
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: Balancing equations
Replies: 17
Views: 120

Re: Balancing equations

Like Evie, I also usually start with the elements in the highest quantity. For combustion analysis, I usually end with balancing the O2, whose coefficient is in a decimal a good amount of the time. After that, I just multiply by a factor that gets the coefficient of O2 to a whole number.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:47 am
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic Spectra Lecture question
Replies: 5
Views: 49

Re: Atomic Spectra Lecture question

Yes, each atom does require a different amount of energy! If you think about the Bohr model, every atom has a different number of electrons; to remove the electrons, it will take an amount of energy specific to that element.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Wed Oct 14, 2020 11:45 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Sig Fig Process
Replies: 13
Views: 103

Re: Sig Fig Process

Like everyone else said, unless the problem specifically states to round after each step (this is rare, but I've seen one question like it before), I would just round at the very end! Usually, if we round too early, the final answer could be slightly off from the correct answer.
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:46 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Module Atomic Spectra Post Assesment Question 42
Replies: 5
Views: 61

Re: Module Atomic Spectra Post Assesment Question 42

To do this problem I actually used a different formula. I used v=R(1/(n1)^2 - 1/(n2)^2) where R is Rydberg's constant = 3.29 * 10^15 Hz. Using the given frequency I plugged each number into the given formula (v=1.14*10^14 Hz, and n1=4). From there I solved for n2 and ended up getting an energy leve...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:22 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Tips for counting sig figs?
Replies: 9
Views: 82

Re: Tips for counting sig figs?

Another tip for counting sig figs that helped me was the Atlantic-Pacific rule. Basically, the central decider to how you count your sig figs is the decimal point. The P in Pacific refers to present (there is a decimal point), and the A in Absent refers to Absent (there is no decimal point). If ther...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:13 am
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Reactants vs. Reagents
Replies: 5
Views: 46

Re: Reactants vs. Reagents

I believe the two can be used interchangeably. But, to be more specific, a reagent is a chemical used in a reaction, and a reactant is a chemical that is consumed during the reaction. So, I guess a reagent becomes a reactant when it undergoes some sort of chemical change during a reaction. Also, on ...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Tue Oct 06, 2020 11:10 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: 1A.9 Units in Answer?
Replies: 2
Views: 44

Re: 1A.9 Units in Answer?

What I'm thinking is that, since they're using MHz for frequency instead of the standard Hz, you would need to use nm for wavelength instead of m. Since frequency and wavelength are both inversely proportional, when the units of one becomes bigger (in this case, frequency), the units of the other wo...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:45 am
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Advice from a Medical Student [ENDORSED]
Replies: 221
Views: 116068

Re: Advice from a Medical Student [ENDORSED]

Thank you so much for this, wow!
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:43 am
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Mol VS Mole
Replies: 17
Views: 201

Re: Mol VS Mole

Another thing to note is that M does not stand for mole. M is used for molarity and stands for mol/L. Adding to this, they sometimes use "c" for molarity as well(like they did in the textbook), and it stands for concentration which is what molarity essential is. To be honest, though, I so...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:04 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Module Quiz
Replies: 5
Views: 68

Re: Photoelectric Effect Module Quiz

I believe the threshold energy pertains to the work function for sodium (which is the amount of heat it takes to remove one electron from a metal — in this case, from a mole of a metal). However, the question is asking for the energy required to remove an electron from one sodium atom. Therefore, yo...
by Jayasree Peri 3D
Fri Oct 02, 2020 9:01 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Emprical Formulas Ever Larger than Molecular? [ENDORSED]
Replies: 26
Views: 436

Re: Emprical Formulas Ever Larger than Molecular? [ENDORSED]

I had a quick question regarding this subject. Does anyone know if when the empirical formula is the same as the molecular formula, does it matter which one you call it? Or should you state that it's both at the same time? I believe it makes no difference but I just want to make sure Hey, I'm prett...

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