Search found 64 matches

by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 6:48 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Sapling HW
Replies: 7
Views: 38

Re: Sapling HW

Aliya Roserie 3I wrote:I did not have this issue. Try emailing your TA to ensure that your grade is accounted for !


Thanks! I'll make sure to do that.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 6:46 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Sapling HW
Replies: 7
Views: 38

Re: Sapling HW

I'm confused about this too. I think I have the same problem. I finished today and on sapling it shows I have a 100% but on ccle it shows I have a 97%. Does it take a while to load or update frequently? CCLE does take a while to catch up to Sapling; to make sure, I would take a screenshot or have s...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 6:32 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Sapling HW
Replies: 7
Views: 38

Sapling HW

I was just checking CCLE and looked at my grade for Week 1's Sapling HW. I completed it during Week 1; I remember because I remember seeing the cute little hopping bunny. Anyways, my grade was a 90% and I was confused as to why. I also faintly remember logging onto CCLE and checking my grade about a...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Sun Jan 17, 2021 5:59 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: endothermic vs exothermic
Replies: 10
Views: 21

Re: endothermic vs exothermic

Endothermic reactions require heat while exothermic reactions release heat. In a given problem you can look for those words or look for the enthalpy of the reaction (denoted by the change symbol/triangle with H). A positive enthalpy is endothermic and negative enthalpy is exothermic.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Jan 13, 2021 2:52 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Left vs. Right
Replies: 29
Views: 90

Re: Left vs. Right

"Favors" or "lies to" the right/left side refers to the K value by itself (either more reactants or more products are present at equilibrium. "Shifts to" the right/left refers to when there is a change in parameters or concentration since the system has to "shift&q...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:19 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Amphoteric vs Amphiprotic
Replies: 5
Views: 20

Re: Amphoteric vs Amphiprotic

You are right in that amphoteric substances can act as an acid or a base. Amphiprotic substances, I think, are just a bit more specific because amphiprotic means that a substance (such as water) can either donate or accept H+ ions. Amphiprotic substances are always amphoteric, but not all amphoteric...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:07 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Ka and Kb
Replies: 3
Views: 33

Ka and Kb

Is it correct to say that we pKa should only be used for measuring the dissociation of weak acids (and pKb for weak bases) while using pH for strong acids (and pOH for strong bases)? If not, what would be the correct way to define pKa vs pH. I was just a bit confused on the distinction between pKa v...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Jan 12, 2021 12:21 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kc and Kp
Replies: 5
Views: 22

Kc and Kp

I was doing a textbook problem and wrote the K expression in terms of concentration but the answer key puts it in terms of partial pressure. Looking back at the reaction, all species are in gas phases so it makes sense why use partial pressure. Is there any instance where we could use Kc instead of ...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Jan 11, 2021 6:10 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: change in K
Replies: 22
Views: 62

Re: change in K

Only temperature will change the K value. Any other change in parameters such as pressure/volume will result in a change in concentration.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 1:39 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Change in Pressure
Replies: 4
Views: 28

Re: Change in Pressure

To find which side has more moles of gas, you just need to look at the coefficients of all gas species. Take for example N2(g) + 3H2(g) <-> 2NH3(g). By counting the coefficients there are 4 moles of gas on the reactant's side (one N2 and three H2) and 2 moles of gas on the product's side (two NH3). ...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Jan 08, 2021 11:57 am
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: ICE Tables with quadratics
Replies: 3
Views: 19

ICE Tables with quadratics

When using the quadratic formula, there should be two values of X if solved correctly. Is there a general rule to which one we should use and the reasoning for why that particular one?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Jan 06, 2021 2:20 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: H2O as a Gas
Replies: 53
Views: 369

Re: H2O as a Gas

If H20 was a pure substance in the reaction (either a liquid or solid) it should not be included. But as a gas (water vapor), always include it in the ICE table.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Jan 04, 2021 12:14 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Module 1A True/False question
Replies: 8
Views: 39

Re: Module 1A True/False question

a. Remember that when a system reaches equilibrium, there is a constant, K. This constant is the ratio of products and reactions ([P]/[R] or P(products)/P(reactants)). Since the forward and reverse reactions are the same at equilibrium, there should be no instance in which products increase or decre...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Jan 04, 2021 12:04 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: KC vs KP [ENDORSED]
Replies: 6
Views: 44

Re: KC vs KP [ENDORSED]

I would always check what units are given. As you stated, if given concentration (Molarity) usually you would be calculating for Kc, and if given atm/bars usually you would be calculating for Kp.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Dec 09, 2020 11:36 am
Forum: Conjugate Acids & Bases
Topic: Conjugates and Charge
Replies: 8
Views: 46

Re: Conjugates and Charge

I guess the safest way to figure out a problem like this is to draw it out. In Lavelle's last lecture, he drew out the Lewis structure of the acid H2SO4. When placed with water, the hydrogens will dissociate and form hydronium with water, then you will first have HSO4^-1 then SO4^-2. These are the c...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Dec 09, 2020 11:27 am
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Deprotonation of a polyphonic acid
Replies: 1
Views: 30

Re: Deprotonation of a polyphonic acid

I'm not sure what you mean by polyphonic, but I am going to assume that you mean polyprotic acid. To tell if the acid is completely deprotonated, you just have to look for H+. Take for example carbonic acid, H2CO3. The neutrally charged species is obviously not deprotonated because it has two H+. Li...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Dec 07, 2020 8:52 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Chelates
Replies: 2
Views: 47

Chelates

I am trying to understand the concept of chelates, so please correct me if I'm wrong. All chelates must be polydentate, but not all polydentates can be chelates? If so, why is that? And what are some major chelates that we should be aware of?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Dec 07, 2020 8:36 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Coordination compounds vs. complexes
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Coordination compounds vs. complexes

Though used interchangeably, the textbook distinguishes the two. If I recall correctly, the complex consists of the ligands and transition metal (or as the textbook says "one or more of the ions or neutral species present in the compound") while the compound is the overall neutrally charge...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Dec 07, 2020 8:29 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: 9C.3d
Replies: 2
Views: 29

9C.3d

I was doing a textbook problem that asks to write the formula of "sodium bisoxalato(diaqua)ferrate(iii)". I almost got the right answer, but the "bis" confused me a bit. I ended up writing "Na [Fe(C2O4)2(OH2)4]" instead of "Na [Fe(C2O4)2(OH2)2]". I was under t...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 12:04 pm
Forum: Properties & Structures of Inorganic & Organic Acids
Topic: Relative Acidity and stability
Replies: 4
Views: 35

Relative Acidity and stability

Can someone explain the significance of having a stable anion in order to have a strong acid? Why does it matter if it is stable or not?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Dec 04, 2020 10:02 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 6
Views: 65

Re: Naming

The prefix "ferr" comes from Latin. "Ferrate" is used because the coordination complex is an anion (has a negative charge). There are other elements that share this characteristic: Silver (Ag) becomes argentate, gold (Au) becomes aurate, and copper (Cu) becomes cuprate.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Dec 02, 2020 12:57 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Strong Acid vs. Weak Acid
Replies: 7
Views: 59

Re: Strong Acid vs. Weak Acid

All you can really do is memorize the strong versus weak acids. There doesn't seem to be a clear trend in identifying them . For example, HCl and HBr are both strong acids and halogens, but HF is a halogen but not a strong acid. The same goes with strong bases and weak bases.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:47 pm
Forum: Biological Examples
Topic: Myoglobin Structure
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Re: Myoglobin Structure

The ligand itself is tetradentate (it can form 4 bonds with the metal (iron). The iron, you are correct, likes to form an octahedral structure (6 bonds). The other two bonds come from the histine and the O2 molecules.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Dec 01, 2020 5:43 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Ba[FeBr4]2
Replies: 3
Views: 24

Ba[FeBr4]2

I was doing some Sapling learning problems and I came across this coordination compound. It's name is barium tetrabromoferrate(iii). I'm a bit confused on the process on how to name it. Can someone tell me how they would approach naming this compound? Thanks.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:57 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: sapling #18
Replies: 1
Views: 45

Re: sapling #18

Two adjacent carbon atoms with a double bond between then will cause the hydrogens to be parallel to each other (on the same plane). Attaching another carbon to either end of the two carbon chain will cause the new carbon and its hydrogens to become perpendicular to the previous two carbons; this th...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:39 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Sp3d or dsp3
Replies: 22
Views: 852

Re: Sp3d or dsp3

As Lavelle mentioned, it does not really matter. It will be accepted either way.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Nov 26, 2020 10:38 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sapling 16
Replies: 6
Views: 54

Re: Sapling 16

Whenever I hear "delocalized" I immediately think resonance. So if a structure has resonance (the double or triple bond can be "placed" between some other atom and the central one), it should have delocalized pi bonds (pi bonds appear in double and triple bonds).
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 11:41 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Cisplatin vs. Transplatin
Replies: 4
Views: 41

Cisplatin vs. Transplatin

Since cisplatin has the chlorines on the same side and transplatin has the chlorines on the opposite sides, is there a reason why the difference in structure happens? I remember that the difference in cis-/trans-dichloroethene from the VSEPR section is due to the double bond and the restrictive forc...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Nov 25, 2020 11:30 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: EDTA example in 11/25 lecture
Replies: 5
Views: 63

EDTA example in 11/25 lecture

Hi, I think I understand the concept of ligands and chelates, but can I get some clarification on why the example at the end of the 11/25 lecture (the EDTA -4) is a hexadentate as opposed to a tridentate or any other polydentate?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:56 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: trans- & cis- Molecules
Replies: 6
Views: 60

trans- & cis- Molecules

I think Lavelle said something about how sigma and pi bonds have an effect on how a molecule like dichloroethene can be either in a fixed shape (cis-dichloroethene = polar) or loose shape (trans-dichloroethene = nonpolar). Are there any other kind of molecules that can help further emphasize and vis...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:42 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: VSEPR notation
Replies: 9
Views: 30

Re: VSEPR notation

Yes VSEPR notation definitely helps with figuring out the shape of a molecule. A is the central atom and X & E are the two different types of electron regions. Counting the number of Xs and Es, you can find the arrangement (tetrahedral, octahedral, etc), but to find the exact shape you got to ta...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:36 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Shape of sigma and pi bonds
Replies: 2
Views: 11

Shape of sigma and pi bonds

I'm having a bit of trouble visualizing the shape of sigma and pi bonds. In Friday's lecture, Lavelle's slides said that sigma bonds allow bound atoms to rotate and pi bonds don't allow rotation. What does that mean and how does that relate to the shape of the bonds?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:29 pm
Forum: Sigma & Pi Bonds
Topic: Sigma and pi
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Sigma and pi

I was wondering, are there only three situations we will be getting in identifying the sigma and pi bonds? Like single = one sigma, double = one sigma & one pi, triple = one sigma & two pi. There wouldn't be any other combination?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Fri Nov 20, 2020 11:24 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Boiling vs. Melting Point
Replies: 15
Views: 102

Re: Boiling vs. Melting Point

Boiling point is the transition of matter from a liquid to a gas while melting point is the transition from a solid to a liquid. I wouldn't worry too much about the difference at the moment, but in relation to intermolecular forces, they trend mostly the same way.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Nov 10, 2020 5:12 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dissociation Energy Trend
Replies: 2
Views: 25

Re: Dissociation Energy Trend

I'm not sure if dissociation energy is a trend like the way we think of electronegativity and atomic radius (someone please correct me if I'm wrong). But generally, dissociation energy increases as the bond between two atoms becomes shorter and therefore harder to break; single bonds are weaker than...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Nov 10, 2020 5:03 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Dipole
Replies: 7
Views: 23

Re: Dipole

Dipoles refer to polar covalent bonds, which is the unequal sharing of electrons between two atoms in a molecule. This occurs when you have an atom (take for example F) has a higher electronegativity than another atom that it is covalently bonded to (for this example H). When F pulls the electrons c...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:51 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: Delta negative and delta positive?
Replies: 8
Views: 56

Re: Delta negative and delta positive?

Putting delta positives or delta negatives indicate that something has a partial positive or negative charge. Something with a delta negative is the more electronegative atom and therefore electrons from the atom it is covalently bonded to will be attracted to the partial negative atom. The best exa...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:46 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: Hydrogen Bonding
Replies: 20
Views: 492

Re: Hydrogen Bonding

Yes. Hydrogen atoms must be polarized by F, O, or N in order for a hydrogen bond to occur.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Tue Nov 10, 2020 1:44 pm
Forum: Dipole Moments
Topic: London (dispersion) force
Replies: 1
Views: 16

Re: London (dispersion) force

Although we haven't learned this yet, BCl3 has a symmetric shape (trigonal planar). You can kind of think of each Chlorine equally pulling Boron in separate directions, so therefore there is no polar movement of the molecule. You can also apply this thinking to I2; the Iodines are equally repelling ...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 4:16 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Chemical Formulas
Replies: 8
Views: 55

Re: Chemical Formulas

There doesn't seem to be a clear requirement to memorize all the molecules and compounds that Lavelle uses, but it is very useful to memorize quite a bit of them. For example, theres a big difference between nitrate and nitrite. I personally think everyone should know how to derive a chemical formul...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 4:13 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Shortcut for Formal Charge
Replies: 19
Views: 583

Re: Shortcut for Formal Charge

I personally just count the number of lone pair electrons (or dots) and the individual bond. After added those two up, I subtract the valence electrons by that number.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Nov 05, 2020 1:40 pm
Forum: Resonance Structures
Topic: Resonance Lecture Question
Replies: 10
Views: 75

Re: Resonance Lecture Question

L stands for the actual number of electrons (or dots, if you will), not the total amount of lone pairs. For example, there may be two lone pairs of electrons, but L will be 4 because there are four individual electrons.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Nov 04, 2020 11:56 am
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Exceptions List
Replies: 4
Views: 57

Exceptions List

I don't know if this is too much to ask, but can someone provide a comprehensive list of the octet guideline exceptions. No detail is needed, but just to kind of wrap my head around everything, a list would be greatly appreciated :) Thanks!
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Nov 04, 2020 11:07 am
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Formal Charge and Stability
Replies: 7
Views: 20

Formal Charge and Stability

Given the formal charge of each atom in a Lewis structure that has resonance, how do you tell which structure will be more/less stable than the other?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:31 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Electron Affinity
Replies: 2
Views: 35

Electron Affinity

Can someone explain why elements in the top right of the periodic table (like group 17) have high electron affinity?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:27 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Rydberg's
Replies: 7
Views: 56

Re: Rydberg's

Rydberg's equation can only be used for H-atoms. Since the whole experiment with exciting an electron to a higher energy level takes into account only a single electron, that is what the equation is modeled after. There would be more complex mathematical equations to deal with multi-electron systems.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 29, 2020 12:23 pm
Forum: Trends in The Periodic Table
Topic: Elements with a low ionization energy
Replies: 6
Views: 62

Re: Elements with a low ionization energy

Elements with a low ionization energy have low ionization energy because electrons on their outer shells are easily removed from the atom. For example, Na has a single electron in its outer shell, and because of electron repulsion that electron is easily removed; it does not take a lot of energy to ...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Oct 26, 2020 4:04 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Is c always the speed of light?
Replies: 88
Views: 455

Re: Is c always the speed of light?

Lavelle emphasized that c is a constant. In the equation c=wavelength.frequency, c is the constant and should always be the speed of light.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Mon Oct 26, 2020 10:37 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Orbitals vs. States
Replies: 1
Views: 16

Orbitals vs. States

Professor Lavelle always mentions that orbital and state are sort of interchangeable. What is the distinction between the two?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:02 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: Electron Density
Replies: 5
Views: 35

Re: Electron Density

Electron density (which is represented as psi^2) refers to the probability of finding an electron in a certain area.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 7:58 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Advice for studying
Replies: 92
Views: 2030

Re: Advice for studying

So what I'm doing is going through all my notes that I've been taking during Lavelle's lectures and modules, making sure I am highlighting the things he emphasizes. For practice problems, Sapling questions are a good way of studying the types of questions could be on the test (the hints and full sol...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:42 pm
Forum: Heisenberg Indeterminacy (Uncertainty) Equation
Topic: delta V
Replies: 4
Views: 53

delta V

This may have been answered already, but I just wanted clarification because I am a bit uncertain (hehe :D). If a question gives you +/- (a number) m/s as delta V, do you use that exact number and plug it into the equation or do you multiply it by 2 to account for both the positive and negative valu...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:35 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: d- Orbitals
Replies: 1
Views: 27

d- Orbitals

Since there are numerous d- orbitals, is there a good way to, not necessarily memorize them, but distinguish them from each other. For example, what would the difference be between d-yz and d-xz and d-xy, both conceptually and on a diagram?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 22, 2020 4:29 pm
Forum: *Shrodinger Equation
Topic: The Hamiltonian
Replies: 8
Views: 119

The Hamiltonian

What is the significance of the Hamiltonian in Schrodinger's equation? I understand that E is the energy of the election and the psi symbol represents the wave function (or the orbital) of the electron, but how does the Hamiltonian relate to any one of these variables?
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 7:33 pm
Forum: Properties of Electrons
Topic: Ephoton > or = to Eremove(e-)
Replies: 7
Views: 81

Re: Ephoton > or = to Eremove(e-)

As a general rule: E(photon)>=E(remove electron) [also called the threshold energy] then the electron will be ejected from the metal. Otherwise the photon will pass through and not interact with the electron.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 7:17 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: finding Ek
Replies: 4
Views: 46

Re: finding Ek

The energy of an ejected electron is kinetic energy. The formula E=hv should probably be only used for the energy of the light source (UV, visible) that will be used to eject that electron. The "left over" energy from the light source will be the ejected electron's kinetic energy (conserva...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 6:55 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Wavelengths and DeBroglie
Replies: 7
Views: 87

Re: Wavelengths and DeBroglie

While the baseball, with appropriate calculations, does technically have a wavelength, it is so incredibly small (some examples have its wavelength at 1.9x10^-39) that it is basically undetectable; it would only be measured through high specialized equipment. Such an object, with it's high mass as c...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 6:35 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Light Intensity
Replies: 8
Views: 66

Re: Light Intensity

Intensity is simply the number of photons. While frequency will determine wether or not an electron will be ejected, intensity actually does determine how many electrons will be ejected, if at all. Increasing intensity allows for more electrons to be ejected, but if every photon's energy is lower th...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Thu Oct 15, 2020 6:28 pm
Forum: Bohr Frequency Condition, H-Atom , Atomic Spectroscopy
Topic: Atomic Spectroscopy
Replies: 5
Views: 45

Re: Atomic Spectroscopy

Atomic spectroscopy falls under the experiments that support quantum mechanics. I think you meant "photons have either wavelike or particle-like properties." When a source of light has the energy matches/exceeds the energy difference between energy levels, it will excite the electron and m...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 8:08 pm
Forum: SI Units, Unit Conversions
Topic: Rounding in Between Steps [ENDORSED]
Replies: 22
Views: 202

Re: Rounding in Between Steps [ENDORSED]

In the middle of calculations, it is important to use exact numbers if those calculations will be used again later in another calculation. If converted to sig figs, there will be differences in what is suppose to be the actual answer. Conversion to sig figs should be done at the end of an answer; al...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:43 pm
Forum: Balancing Chemical Reactions
Topic: Fractions
Replies: 34
Views: 566

Re: Fractions

While using fractions when balancing out chemical equations is totally fine and in many cases useful/easier, it is always best to convert it into an integer.
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 7:40 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: Which number determines sig figs of the answer?
Replies: 26
Views: 179

Re: Which number determines sig figs of the answer?

In chemistry, there are two sets of operations with different rules when it comes to significant figures. With multiplication/division, the resulting answer will depend on the value of the least amount of sig figs; in this case, two significant figures (9.2). With addition/division, the resulting an...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:56 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: mmol/mL vs. mol/L
Replies: 6
Views: 70

Re: mmol/mL vs. mol/L

Yes, mmol/mL can be represented as (M) for molarity because both units have the prefix of "milli." Since molarity has the units "mole/L," the "milli" would, to put it simply, cancel out. It could be unlikely we would see such units for the sake of accuracy and simplicit...
by Jonathan Batac - 2D
Wed Oct 07, 2020 5:50 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Actual and Theoretical yields
Replies: 14
Views: 123

Re: Actual and Theoretical yields

It is very unlikely that actual yield will equal theoretical yield. A percent yield of 100% can be approachable, but due to impurities, side reactions, and substances sticking to sides of experimental equipment as stated in the professor's lectures and modules, it can probably never be fully reached.

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