Search found 66 matches

by Leyla Anwar 3B
Tue Jan 26, 2021 12:18 am
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Problem 8.45
Replies: 2
Views: 1732

Re: Problem 8.45

There is no reason to use the deltaH = nCpdeltaT equation for this problem since the reaction enthalpy is given and you are simply asked for how much heat is absorbed (or in part c, given the amount of heat absorbed and asked to find the amount of CO2 produced). To calculate part a, simply multiply...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:21 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: standard states
Replies: 6
Views: 33

Re: standard states

The ones I can remember he saying in class were graphite, O2, and H2. Were there any others he explicitly mention? He also mentioned C and I think N2. Hopefully he will supply all bond enthalpies with any question requiring it and if it is not on the list then you can most likely assume it is 0 and...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:15 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Polyprotic Acids
Replies: 8
Views: 38

Re: Polyprotic Acids

Does polyprotic mean that it can donate more than one proton? And therefore make monoprotic mean there can only be a subtraction of one proton? (or addition of many/one electron)
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Jan 24, 2021 4:12 pm
Forum: Applying Le Chatelier's Principle to Changes in Chemical & Physical Conditions
Topic: Increasing pressure
Replies: 23
Views: 66

Re: Increasing pressure

What is an inert gas and could someone please give an example?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 23, 2021 7:49 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling week 2 #9 and 10
Replies: 3
Views: 25

Re: Sapling week 2 #9 and 10

Basically all you have to do is compare the pKa and the pH. If you are dealing with an acid: pH > pKa then it is charged because there is more A- (which is charged) pH < pKa then it is neutral because there is more HA (which has no charge) If you are dealing with a base: pH > pKa then it is neutral ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 23, 2021 5:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling 2 #5
Replies: 2
Views: 32

Sapling 2 #5

Hey! I was able to solve this problem: "The Kb for an amine is 9.254×10−5. What percentage of the amine is protonated if the pH of a solution of the amine is 9.204 ? Assume that all OH− came from the reaction of B with H2O" but had one question. The feedback of the problem said "To de...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Jan 17, 2021 2:53 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Strong vs Weak Acids and Bases
Replies: 7
Views: 30

Re: Strong vs Weak Acids and Bases

Here is a list of the strong bases:
LiOH - lithium hydroxide
NaOH - sodium hydroxide
KOH - potassium hydroxide
RbOH - rubidium hydroxide
CsOH - cesium hydroxide
*Ca(OH)2 - calcium hydroxide
*Sr(OH)2 - strontium hydroxide
*Ba(OH)2 - barium hydroxide
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Jan 17, 2021 2:50 pm
Forum: Non-Equilibrium Conditions & The Reaction Quotient
Topic: Q and K
Replies: 46
Views: 159

Re: Q and K

Yes, Q is any time. You would measure Q at that moment to determine the direction of the reaction. If Q<K, the reaction is going right; more products are made If Q>K, the reaction is going left; more reactants are made Does this mean there can be multiple Q values for different times during the rea...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 16, 2021 3:16 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling #5
Replies: 5
Views: 53

Re: Sapling #5

This problem can be solved in the way we solve simultaneous linear equations in algebra. So in this particular question, you will have to add the first reaction equation and the REVERSE of the third reaction equation. Also you might have multiply one of the equations by a constant and don't forget ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 16, 2021 2:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling Question #4
Replies: 6
Views: 47

Re: Sapling Question #4

I have tried this problem and I believe I am setting up my ICE table correctly. When you are setting up the Kp equation, are Ppcl5, Ppcl3 and Pcl2 the same thing as the equilibrium values for PCl5, PCl3, and Cl2? I guess I'm wondering if their partial pressures are the same as their equilibrium val...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 16, 2021 2:13 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling Question #4
Replies: 6
Views: 47

Re: Sapling Question #4

I have tried this problem and I believe I am setting up my ICE table correctly. When you are setting up the Kp equation, are Ppcl5, Ppcl3 and Pcl2 the same thing as the equilibrium values for PCl5, PCl3, and Cl2? I guess I'm wondering if their partial pressures are the same as their equilibrium valu...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:43 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Textbook Problem 5G. 1
Replies: 4
Views: 32

Re: Textbook Problem 5G. 1

Something to remember here is that, yes while temperature causes a change in K, if the pressure is changed by a change in volume, then K would change as well (because concentration is changing). That is not the case for C but just to remind you. And for D, like others have stated, because of Le Chat...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:34 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Kp vs. Kc
Replies: 3
Views: 16

Re: Kp vs. Kc

They are essentially the same, you use the same equation to solve for both so with that they are interchangeable. Like they have said above, you can use the ideal gas law for that conversion. The equation is PV=nRT and since you would be changing from concentration to pressure or vice versa, you can...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:27 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling Question 4
Replies: 5
Views: 51

Re: Sapling Question 4

For this question how do you solve for P? I don't really understand what P is when you are using the K equation?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:16 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Calculating concentrations using ICE Chart
Replies: 8
Views: 33

Re: Calculating concentrations using ICE Chart

When using an ICE chart do you always do "-x" for the products and "+x" for the reactants? That was a pattern I noticed but I don't know for sure.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Jan 09, 2021 4:08 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Sapling #5
Replies: 11
Views: 86

Re: Sapling #5

I'm struggling to get the right answer for this question. I know you have to use Hess's Law, but I think I'm uncertain on how to manipulate the separate K values for the different equations when you have to, say, flip the reaction or multiply it by 3. Can someone please explain. What is Hess's Law?...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:40 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization with coefficients
Replies: 3
Views: 37

Hybridization with coefficients

What does it mean when a hybridization is something like 2sp3? Someone told me it meant a higher n state but I don't know to figure that out when looking at the lewis structure of a compound. If anyone understands that and could explain, I would be grateful : )
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Dec 12, 2020 11:36 pm
Forum: Calculating pH or pOH for Strong & Weak Acids & Bases
Topic: Sapling 10
Replies: 6
Views: 43

Re: Sapling 10

For strong acids and bases is the only way to know by memorizing them? How do we figure it out without memorization?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Dec 12, 2020 10:30 pm
Forum: Air Pollution & Acid Rain
Topic: Final Exam
Replies: 5
Views: 357

Re: Final Exam

Is this still true? Do we need to know how to calculate with acid rain formulas for the final?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Dec 12, 2020 10:28 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Titration Diagram
Replies: 4
Views: 63

Re: Titration Diagram

To be clear, we don't really have to know tritration for the final do we? Is what we have to know basically the stoichiometric point where moles acids added = moles of base sample?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Dec 12, 2020 10:24 pm
Forum: Calculating the pH of Salt Solutions
Topic: Solving PH/PoH
Replies: 11
Views: 86

Re: Solving PH/PoH

Image

This is what the square looked like and helps if only given one value you're trying to find the other.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:59 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Oxidation State
Replies: 16
Views: 74

Re: Oxidation State

The oxidation state is the number of electrons gained or lost by the atom in question (usually, the question will ask about the central atom). For example, the oxidation state of Al in [AlF4]- is +3. Basically, in order to find the oxidation number, just find the charge of the other atom (multiplie...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:54 am
Forum: Naming
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 8
Views: 58

Re: Polydentate

How would you identify a monodentate and a bidentate? If you are shown a picture you would be able to see if an atom or molecule is bonded to the central TM atom one time or if it bonds multiple times. Bidentate would mean two bonds and it would look almost like a flower petal, attachments at two s...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:44 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Ligand names
Replies: 6
Views: 46

Re: Ligand names

I think it is important to remember that the final is closed book so we wont be able to use the table provided on Dr. Lavelle's website which means that you will have to memorize the names. It would be best to get a lot of naming practice beforehand :) .
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:42 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Coordination Number Question
Replies: 12
Views: 119

Re: Coordination Number Question

Hi! I agree with the above post. I also think it's important to keep in mind the denticity of the ligands in the coordination complex. For example, if one of the ligands is bidentate, then it could form 2 coordinate covalent bonds with the central atom (it would count as 2 instead of 1 towards the ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Dec 06, 2020 11:38 am
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: coordination number
Replies: 13
Views: 80

Re: coordination number

Can someone explain more in detail of what bidentate means in a coordination compound and how it is different from a monodentate? Bidentate ligands are able to attach/bond to the transition metal twice. (Tridentate= three times, polydentate= multiple bonds) Sorry, forgot to add this. This means tha...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:09 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Ligands
Replies: 4
Views: 72

Re: Ligands

Are ligands specific to transition metals/metals or can they be applied to all elements?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:07 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Bond Order
Replies: 11
Views: 193

Re: Bond Order

Does that mean that the bond order is the number of electrons between two bonded atoms?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:06 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Delocalized Pi Bond/Resonance
Replies: 2
Views: 42

Re: Delocalized Pi Bond/Resonance

This would be true with any bond that is more than just a single bond because a double bond and triple bond mean that a pi bond is present. You can't have a pi bond with single bonds (because those are sigma). Any structure with resonance, means there is at least one bond greater than a single bond ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 29, 2020 10:01 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Bond angles
Replies: 8
Views: 72

Re: Bond angles

Given that Lavelle has said we don't need to really know but to have the general understanding, especially with basic angles that we see a lot, like 109.5, how did you all solve #17 on sapling (asking for the bond angles of the C3H4 diagrams)? I don't really understand how to do it.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 29, 2020 9:56 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: angle size
Replies: 11
Views: 76

Re: angle size

For me, the only stuff I memorize is the names of the different shapes and how all angles in a tetrahedral shape are 109.5. For the rest of the shapes, I just go back to freshman geometry days and solve for the angles by dividing 360 by the number of bonds in each plane (x, y, z). How do you know h...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 22, 2020 10:12 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Polarity through shape
Replies: 8
Views: 70

Re: Polarity through shape

How would lone pairs affect the ability for dipole moments to cancel out? Would it at all? I know it changes the shape by repelling other bonds and pushing them down so would that make their symmetry off?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 22, 2020 10:02 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: book problem 2E.5
Replies: 3
Views: 30

Re: book problem 2E.5

An ion by definition will have lost or gained electrons, so this can result in a change of the number of electron densities, therefore ions tend to be angular shaped. For OClO there are 3 regions of electron so the electron domain geometry will be trigonal planar, but since only 2 of the 3 position...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:59 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: Sapling #10
Replies: 5
Views: 46

Re: Sapling #10

Although both O and F have higher electronegativities than C, the net vector would be between the F atoms because difference in electronegativity of C and F is greater than that of C and O. The easiest way to look at this problem in my opinion is through the net vector. It shows what would cancel a...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:54 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: double bonding
Replies: 8
Views: 74

Re: double bonding

Like everyone else has stated, not all molecules with a double bond are bent. CO2 is a good example of this. When there are no lone pairs on the C then the O's want to be as far away from each other as possible because of their electronegativity (I think). CO2 is a linear molecule with two double bo...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 22, 2020 9:50 pm
Forum: Determining Molecular Shape (VSEPR)
Topic: memorizing VSEPR models
Replies: 13
Views: 79

Re: memorizing VSEPR models

When trying to memorize the VSEPR models, do we also need to memorize the angles since we cannot calculate them?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:08 pm
Forum: Octet Exceptions
Topic: Textbook 2C.1
Replies: 5
Views: 50

Re: Textbook 2C.1

How would you arrange OH in order to make it a total charge 0 and a radical? I figure you just take away one electron from O (7 valence e- instead of 8)? Can you just do that?
If anyone could please explain for CH3 as well I would appreciate it so much.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 15, 2020 6:01 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: C and H electronegativity
Replies: 7
Views: 67

Re: C and H electronegativity

To determine the difference in electronegativity, you can use a periodic table that displays electronegativity values. For a C-H bond, the difference would be: 2.55 - 2.20 = .35 (electronegativity of C minus electronegativity of H). In this case, the difference is too small for the compound to be r...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:59 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: London Dispersion Forces
Replies: 9
Views: 87

Re: London Dispersion Forces

I have found the answer to be A, B, and E. I understand I2 but I don't understand C2H6 or BF3. How do C and H not have a difference in electronegativity and why would BF3 and NF3 have similar forces applied to them? They both have different electronegativity between the atoms in their molecules and ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 15, 2020 5:38 pm
Forum: Electronegativity
Topic: London Dispersion Forces
Replies: 9
Views: 87

Re: London Dispersion Forces

I have a similar question from sapling:
Which molecules exhibit only London (dispersion) forces?

a. C2H6

b. BF3

c. NF3

d. CH3Cl

e. I2

I have tried almost every combination. I thought it was just I2 (E) but it tells me I'm wrong. I really don't know the answer. Could someone please explain?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 15, 2020 2:26 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: LDF Bond Strength
Replies: 11
Views: 93

LDF Bond Strength

One of the sapling question asks us to list the order from strongest to weakest LDF bond. The molecules were I2, Br2, and Cl2 and placed in that order. The reasoning was that the larger and heavier the atom, the stronger the bond length. I thought it would be the opposite because the larger the atom...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 08, 2020 8:00 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: formal charge and stability
Replies: 8
Views: 55

Re: formal charge and stability

If you can't get the total charge to 0 (FC=0 for all atoms) then would you want any specific atom to be the one that can get FC=0 (if possible at all)? Like, would it be the atom in the center of the lewis structure? Or the atom with the highest or lowest electronegativity?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 08, 2020 7:55 pm
Forum: Formal Charge and Oxidation Numbers
Topic: Oxidation number?
Replies: 8
Views: 77

Re: Oxidation number?

For this problem I was confused as well. Just knowing that the O oxidation number was 2- helped because the total oxidation number should equal total charge. Count up the total oxidation number for all the Os and then subtract to what you need to reach the total charge of the molecule and that will ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Nov 07, 2020 10:31 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Nitrite and Nitrate Lewis Structures
Replies: 3
Views: 20

Nitrite and Nitrate Lewis Structures

One of the Sapling questions asked us to draw the lewis structures for nitrite and nitrate but did not give us the compounds' formulas. Are we supposed to have the polyatomic ions memorized for this class? I didn't realize it was one of those for awhile and thought I was missing something. I guess i...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Nov 07, 2020 10:27 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Atomic Radius
Replies: 38
Views: 224

Re: Atomic Radius

Does the atomic radius being smallest at the top right have anything to do with the more complete octet those elements have? Because as you move down the radius increases but it has extra valence electrons that need to be balanced. I guess I'm just wondering if the octet has anything to do with it.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Nov 07, 2020 10:13 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Formal Charge Equation
Replies: 10
Views: 52

Re: Formal Charge Equation

Does this mean that, for example (not real)
..
H-N-H (pretend the dots are on top and below N, not the first H)
..

the equation for FC of N would be: 5 - (2/2 - 4) instead of 5 - (4/2 - 4)?
I thought that you count each line (-) as two? But you all are saying you count it as one?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:14 am
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: N levels for electron configurations
Replies: 6
Views: 50

Re: N levels for electron configurations

In short, having the l=1 is in there places a limitation on the whole thing. So it no longer the entire n=5 shell, its the l=1 sub-shell number of electrons which is less than the entire n=1 shell.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Nov 01, 2020 12:06 am
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: d orbitals
Replies: 17
Views: 97

Re: d orbitals

So 5 d means there are 5 different orbitals in the d-block? Then this means there are 1 for s, 2 for p, 5 for d, and 7 for f? I have been confused on this myself. And the orbitals are the shapes that they (are 'they' electrons?) can take?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Oct 31, 2020 11:57 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Orbital vs. Subshell
Replies: 13
Views: 93

Re: Orbital vs. Subshell

What is the difference between a shell and a sub-shell? And which is the orbital within?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Oct 31, 2020 6:14 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Sapling Question on number of electrons
Replies: 6
Views: 87

Re: Sapling Question on number of electrons

I actually think I understand more clearly now. The n=3 shell can hold up to 18 electrons because: 1s = 2 electrons 2s = 2 electrons, 2p = 6 electrons 3s= 2 electrons, 3p = 6 electrons, 3d = 10 electrons since n=3 is the row of the 3s^ the amount of electrons is 18: 2+6+10 = 18 As for n=6, l=3, the ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sat Oct 31, 2020 6:05 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Sapling Question on number of electrons
Replies: 6
Views: 87

Re: Sapling Question on number of electrons

For a similar problem, "How many electrons in an atom could have these sets of quantum numbers?" n=3 n=4,l=3 n=6,l=3,ml=−1 I am unable to figure out how to solve this. I calculated 14 for n=4, l=3 because I counted 2 electrons per orbital up to the f-block in the 4th shell and I said 2 for...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Oct 25, 2020 4:06 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Fundamental M.9
Replies: 3
Views: 53

Re: Fundamental M.9

Will ion equations be covered in Midterm 1? I realize it is part of the fundamentals so does that mean we should know how to solve these types of problems?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Oct 25, 2020 4:00 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamentals F
Replies: 2
Views: 54

Re: Fundamentals F

For this problem why would the Na be multiplied by 2. Also, do the charges of the elements affect how this problem is solved?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Oct 25, 2020 3:50 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Stuck on Sapling HW
Replies: 14
Views: 201

Re: Stuck on Sapling HW

Why do we need to convert from g to moles here? Does the molarity equation need to have the compound in moles instead of grams? I just don't know the reasoning for needing moles. Thanks.
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Oct 25, 2020 3:32 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: E1
Replies: 9
Views: 1238

Re: E1

This answer would be 3 sig figs because in the question, the smallest number of sig figs given was 3 (144 pm and 1.00 mol both have 3 sig figs). When you do calculations with multiplication or division, to determine how may sig figs your answer has, you use the same number of sig figs as the number ...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Fri Oct 23, 2020 9:59 pm
Forum: Accuracy, Precision, Mole, Other Definitions
Topic: Molar Mass and Metal/Sulfides
Replies: 4
Views: 3747

Re: Molar Mass and Metal/Sulfides

Hi, where does the 32.05 come from? Is that how to make any metal a sulfide? Or is that specific to Ca?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Sun Oct 18, 2020 5:43 pm
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Diatomic Molecules
Replies: 2
Views: 21

Diatomic Molecules

A question on sapling says: "The average speed of a diatomic chlorine molecule at 25 degrees C is 323.9 m/s^-1. What is the wavelength of a chlorine molecule at this temperature? Assume that the molecule acts as a single particle." In order to solve this problem it was necessary to note th...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:42 pm
Forum: DeBroglie Equation
Topic: Quantum Help
Replies: 5
Views: 206

Re: Quantum Help

Personally, I always write down all the equations I know. For example, on the top of my page I would write "E=hv", "c=v(lamba)" and the same for the rest. You should also do this with constants (ex: h= 6.626 x 10^-34). Then, after reading the question, write down your known value...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:34 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Einstein Equation
Replies: 10
Views: 223

Re: Einstein Equation

In E=hv,
h = planck's constant --> 6.626 x 10^-34 ; since this is a constant it will always be this value
v = frequency (Hz)
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:32 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: m vs nm
Replies: 66
Views: 462

Re: m vs nm

The difference between m and nm is usually that when solving for wavelength your result would be an answer similar to (for example), (7.14 x 10^-7)m. I have noticed that it is usually 10^-7m and since nm = 10^-9, the only thing you have to do to convert is move the decimal over two more spaces to th...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Wed Oct 14, 2020 5:26 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Photoelectric Effect Energy and Excess Energy
Replies: 9
Views: 89

Re: Photoelectric Effect Energy and Excess Energy

Something important to keep in mind to help you remember is that increasing the intensity only increases the number of photons, not the incident energy. The electron won't be emitted without enough energy to overcome the threshold energy and to combat this issue, the frequency must be increased. The...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Wed Oct 07, 2020 11:00 am
Forum: Properties of Light
Topic: Infrared radiation and Wavelength
Replies: 3
Views: 1495

Re: Infrared radiation and Wavelength

For this same question, how do you find how many photons of infrared radiation the lamp generates in 1.0 s? You take the total energy (11J) and divide it by the energy per photon? I'm not really sure. If someone could explain I would appreciate it. Additionally, I am not sure how to configure the &q...
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:09 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: E(Photon) to Electron Ejection
Replies: 3
Views: 22

Re: E(Photon) to Electron Ejection

So within a specific example that could be the case? I think I understand. Thank you for helping!
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Mon Oct 05, 2020 10:40 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Electron Mass
Replies: 2
Views: 16

Electron Mass

When asked to solve the kinetic energy of an ejected electron in a photoelectric effect centered question, if the mass of the electron is not stated do we assume it is a constant (9.11 x 10^-31 kg)? I worked on a problem where I needed to solve for the Ek but I did not know the mass of the electron....
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Mon Oct 05, 2020 10:37 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: Long Wavelength Light
Replies: 3
Views: 75

Long Wavelength Light

If long wavelength light is not ejecting electrons from a metal surface, how come increasing the intensity would not help eject electrons? Why would the wavelength being "long" prevent the light from acting like a "wave"?
by Leyla Anwar 3B
Mon Oct 05, 2020 10:33 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: E(Photon) to Electron Ejection
Replies: 3
Views: 22

E(Photon) to Electron Ejection

Hi. When watching the video module centered around photoelectric effect, I became under the impression that one photon could have enough energy to eject one electron but Dr. Lavelle at one point stated that "no one photon has enough energy to remove one electron because it is a one photon to on...

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