Search found 10 matches

by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:39 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: d-orbitals in MO diagrams
Replies: 1
Views: 353

d-orbitals in MO diagrams

How would we represent d-orbitals in an MO diagram? Are they irrelevant so we don't have to do them?
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Sat Dec 13, 2014 3:12 pm
Forum: *Titrations & Titration Calculations
Topic: Chapter 12.23
Replies: 8
Views: 941

Re: Chapter 12.23

The problem with the question is it didn't give any final mL values for added HCl. The manual referenced the 30mL, which obviously isn't where we'd get the absolute minimum pH possible, but the question itself did not. I think it's a problem with the question itself. That being said, it would be a s...
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Fri Dec 12, 2014 8:57 pm
Forum: *Titrations & Titration Calculations
Topic: 12.35
Replies: 2
Views: 464

12.35

For part f, when it asks about the pH of the solution at the stoichiometric point, since there are no moles of ammonia left, does that affect the equation? I tried working it out and got a totally wrong pH.
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Thu Dec 11, 2014 4:48 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Br 2+
Replies: 7
Views: 2561

Re: Br 2+

The d-orbital shouldn't matter because it doesn't affect the valence electron count, which is what determines bond order and magnetism in the MO diagram. That being said I'd be interested to see how the d-orbital affects MO diagrams as well.
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Wed Dec 10, 2014 10:26 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: 10.69
Replies: 1
Views: 307

Re: 10.69

I'm assuming this is because K is extremely small. This means the reactant is heavily favored, so the reaction would likely shift as much to the left as possible.
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Wed Dec 10, 2014 9:56 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: H2O Being a monodentate
Replies: 1
Views: 382

Re: H2O Being a monodentate

Both lone pairs are on the oxygen. This makes it so that H2O only has one point on it that can bind to the central metal atom, so it's monodentate.
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Wed Dec 10, 2014 5:18 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Cobalt vs Cobaltate
Replies: 3
Views: 4577

Re: Cobalt vs Cobaltate

I'll pitch in a little and list some curveball "-ates".

Iron - Ferrate
Copper - Cuprate
Lead - Plumbate
Silver - Argentate
Gold - Aurate
Tin - Stannate
Platinum - Platinate
Cadmium - Cadmate

Hope that helps!
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:57 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Br 2+
Replies: 7
Views: 2561

Re: Br 2+

Br has 7 valence electrons, so Br2 should have 14. Br2 2+, however, should have 2 less electrons.

Br2 2+ should be paramagnetic because when you remove the 2 electrons, the 3pi-x and 3pi-y will be unpaired, like Shreyesi said. I'm pretty sure it's a typo, you could check with Lavelle.
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:40 pm
Forum: Hybridization
Topic: Hybridization of lone pairs
Replies: 3
Views: 554

Re: Hybridization of lone pairs

Sorry for the fairly late reply. The lone pairs would be denoted the as O 2sp^2, which is just what the O is hybridized as. Lone pairs are denoted the same way as the atom they're on. Hope that helps.
by Sohaib Kazmi 4H
Wed Dec 10, 2014 4:33 pm
Forum: Lewis Acids & Bases
Topic: H2O - Weak Acid or Strong Base?
Replies: 2
Views: 8472

Re: H2O - Weak Acid or Strong Base?

Water is considered amphoteric, meaning it can act as either an acid or a base depending on what it's working with.

That being said, it's usually considered a Lewis base because of the lone pair electrons on the O.

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