Search found 11 matches

by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Sat Dec 13, 2014 11:37 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: Br 2+
Replies: 7
Views: 2546

Re: Br 2+

So just double checking.... it is a typo right?
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Fri Dec 12, 2014 11:18 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Octahedral
Replies: 2
Views: 816

Octahedral

Hi! Just out of curiosity, when naming molecular shapes, why are molecular compounds with six pairs of electrons or bonds are called octahedral? Isn't the prefix octa- means 8? haha just wondering! Thanks :)
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Thu Dec 11, 2014 1:27 pm
Forum: Acidity & Basicity Constants and The Conjugate Seesaw
Topic: Fall 2009 Practice Final, Problem 7
Replies: 1
Views: 404

Re: Fall 2009 Practice Final, Problem 7

I have the same question! And also, why do they use 10^-7 for H3O+ instead of 10^-6?
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:25 pm
Forum: Empirical & Molecular Formulas
Topic: Converting from moles of H20 to moles of H, Fall 2009 Exam
Replies: 2
Views: 499

Re: Converting from moles of H20 to moles of H, Fall 2009 Ex

You use the molar ratio! So after you convert H2O to moles, you know that for 1 mole of H20, there are 2 moles of H and then you do conversions from there! :)
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Mon Dec 08, 2014 11:14 pm
Forum: *Molecular Orbital Theory (Bond Order, Diamagnetism, Paramagnetism)
Topic: How to draw MO
Replies: 1
Views: 561

Re: How to draw MO

Hello :) There is only one! because the total number of electrons for N2+ is 9, so in the sigma2p orbital, there is one unpaired electron. The other MO orbitals each have 2 electrons, thus the total number of electrons in the MO orbitals should add up to 9 electrons. I hope that helps! :)
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Wed Nov 26, 2014 1:24 pm
Forum: Coordinate Covalent Bonds
Topic: Polydentate
Replies: 1
Views: 605

Polydentate

On one of the homework problem, the question asks: Which of the following ligands can be polydentate? If the ligand can be polydentate, give the maximum number of places on the ligand that can bind simultaneously to a single metal center. a.) HN(CH2CH2NH2) b.) CO3^2- c.) H2O d.) oxalate For this pro...
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Fri Nov 21, 2014 10:35 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Textbook HW problem #1c
Replies: 1
Views: 335

Re: Textbook HW problem #1c

The equillibrium constant does not change when there are changes in pressure or concentration. It only changes when there are changes in temperature. This is because when there are changes in pressure or concentration, the reaction will shift itself to either to the left or right to produce enough r...
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Thu Oct 16, 2014 2:22 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Valence-shell configuration [ENDORSED]
Replies: 3
Views: 1859

Re: Valence-shell configuration [ENDORSED]

Hi Erica! This problem is just asking for the generalized electron configuration of the groups of elements. For instance, in (a) it asking for the electron configuration of all the alkali metals. Since all alkali metals only have 1 valence electron and is in the s-obrital, we know that the configura...
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Thu Oct 16, 2014 2:06 pm
Forum: Wave Functions and s-, p-, d-, f- Orbitals
Topic: Electron Spins
Replies: 5
Views: 811

Re: Electron Spins

I'm wondering the same question too!
I think it's because these electron 'spins' are actually electromagnetic fields with the positive field paired with a negative field and not positive and positive or negative and negative. I'm not sure though. :/
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Thu Oct 16, 2014 1:52 pm
Forum: Quantum Numbers and The H-Atom
Topic: Shell vs Subshell vs Orbital...Scale?
Replies: 2
Views: 674

Re: Shell vs Subshell vs Orbital...Scale?

n, l, and m are quantum numbers. The n is related to the size and energy of the orbital. The higher the number n, the larger the atom. This is because there are more orbits and thus the electrons are farther away from the nucleus. Likewise, the larger the number n, the more energy is absorbed and ev...
by Chelsea Zeng 4E
Thu Oct 16, 2014 1:18 pm
Forum: Limiting Reactant Calculations
Topic: Finding how many grams are left of the excess reactant
Replies: 1
Views: 1384

Finding how many grams are left of the excess reactant

Q: A reaction vessel contains 5.77g of white phosphorus and 5.77 g of oxygen. The first reaction to take place is the formation of phosphorus(III) oxide: P4(s)+3O2(g)->P4O6(s). If enough oxygen is present, the oxygen can react further with this oxide to produce phosphorus(V) oxide: P4O6(s)+2O2(g)->P...

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