Search found 13 matches

by Eduardo Torres 3G
Tue Dec 02, 2014 12:47 am
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: Calculating partial pressure using concentration
Replies: 3
Views: 764

Re: Calculating partial pressure using concentration

Normally for these kinds of problems you are also given temperature. With this information PV=nRT can be readjusted to P=cRT (since concentration=n/V). Now you can find the partial pressure of that molecule and use the formula for Kp to find the partial pressure of another reactant or product. I hop...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sun Nov 30, 2014 8:33 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Determining number of ligands
Replies: 7
Views: 2044

Re: Determining number of ligands

In this type of problems, first you look at the number of areas that are bonded around the central atom. Since it wants a square planar complex, it will have four bonding areas (compared to octahedral which has six). Next, we learned that en ligands bond to an atom at two sites (it is bidentate beca...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:36 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Chloride for both Cl and Cl2
Replies: 2
Views: 715

Re: Chloride for both Cl and Cl2

Since Cl is the anion of the complex when it is outside the brackets, it is called chloride regardless of the number. For example, NaCl is sodium chloride and MgCl2 is magnesium chloride. The amount is implied through the charge of the cation (you use as many as you need to make the molecule neutral...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:25 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Quiz 3 Preparation #8 atm^2 for Kp
Replies: 3
Views: 549

Re: Quiz 3 Preparation #8 atm^2 for Kp

Although the equilibrium constants are unit less, they are a result of multiplying values with units. The problem is trying to let you know that your final answer will in units of atm and it can be solved. Since you start off with pure NH4HS(s), and NH3(g) and H2S(g) have a mole ration of 1 to 1, th...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 11:00 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Temperature in Homework Problems
Replies: 2
Views: 451

Re: Temperature in Homework Problems

Usually the temperature is a piece of information that you can just skip over, but this is not true if you have to use the equation PV=nRT. This would be the case if, for example, the moles of a gas are given and the volume of the container. Then, you would need the temperature to find the partial p...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:51 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: 2012 quiz 3 prep #1
Replies: 5
Views: 1228

Re: 2012 quiz 3 prep #1

As for the original question, when it comes to ions, the nonmetal at the end is not given a prefix because the number of atoms is assumed according to charge. For example, for MgCl2 you write magnesium chloride and it is assumed that there are 2 Cl because of the charges. Since H2O has a charge of 0...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:42 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming two complex ions in one compound
Replies: 1
Views: 329

Re: Naming two complex ions in one compound

I believe the naming would be two separate words because in all the examples we've seen we write the name of what is in the brackets as one words and anything before or after it as a separate word. As for the oxidation numbers of the metals, my initial guess would be to make each compound have a net...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 10:27 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: naming complexes vs. coordination compounds
Replies: 3
Views: 601

Re: naming complexes vs. coordination compounds

From the examples in the workbook it seems like the order does not seem to matter as long as you write the ligands after the metal atom. There are examples where the anion ligand is before the neutral ligands and vice versa.
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:21 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: naming complexes vs. coordination compounds
Replies: 3
Views: 601

Re: naming complexes vs. coordination compounds

No, when naming a coordination compound, whatever is within the brackets is always named in alphabetical order and anything before or after is named before and after the compounds. For example, [Cr(en)2(H20)Cl]Cl2 is aquachlorbisethylenediaminechromium(III) chloride. The ligands are named in alphabe...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:10 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 3
Views: 392

Re: Naming

And say the complex were [CoCl(NH3)5]Cl2-, the Co will have a +2 charge because the complex has to have a net charge of -1. So this time we have cobalt(II). I hope this answers your question.
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:07 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming
Replies: 3
Views: 392

Re: Naming

To calculate the oxidation number of the metal in the compound first you must look at the other elements and compounds that are attached to it and determine its charge from there. For example, in [CoCl(NH3)5]Cl2, you are expected to know that Cl has a charge of -1 and NH3 has a charge of 0. Since th...
by Eduardo Torres 3G
Thu Nov 27, 2014 3:43 pm
Forum: Equilibrium Constants & Calculating Concentrations
Topic: Equilibrium Composition
Replies: 1
Views: 289

Re: Equilibrium Composition

You may be thinking about the moles of molecules rather than the moles of atoms. The amount of moles of atoms on each side of the equation must be the same, but the same is not necessarily true for the number of molecules. For example, in the reaction H+ + I- --> HI, one can use 0.100 moles of H+ an...

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