Search found 10 matches

by DrewGomberg_1D
Sat Mar 12, 2016 3:30 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Why is F electrophile?
Replies: 5
Views: 847

Re: Why is F electrophile?

F is a halogen which have high electronegativity and want to gain a single electron to complete a full octet of valence electrons. However, in some reactions involving diatomic halogens F (and other halogens) can act as an electrophile and nucleophile (in this case it'd be two different F atoms.
by DrewGomberg_1D
Sat Mar 12, 2016 2:45 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Why is F electrophile?
Replies: 5
Views: 847

Re: Why is F electrophile?

F is a halogen which have high electronegativity and want to gain a single electron to complete a full octet of valence electrons. However, in some reactions involving diatomic halogens F (and other halogens) can act as an electrophile and nucleophile (in this case it'd be two different F atoms.
by DrewGomberg_1D
Sun Mar 06, 2016 6:21 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Determining Half Reactions
Replies: 1
Views: 221

Determining Half Reactions

When given two electrodes and two different solutions (with multiple ions) how are we supposed to determine which molecules take part in the redox reaction vs. what molecules are simply transported over the salt bridge to make sure the solutions remain neutral. One of the practice finals has a quest...
by DrewGomberg_1D
Thu Mar 03, 2016 1:08 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Diatomic as Electrophile and Nucleophile
Replies: 1
Views: 348

Diatomic as Electrophile and Nucleophile

In one question of our quiz prep Br2 acts as both an Electrophile and a Nucleophile. I was wondering the mechanism behind this.
by DrewGomberg_1D
Thu Feb 25, 2016 9:40 pm
Forum: Kinetics vs. Thermodynamics Controlling a Reaction
Topic: Spontaneousness
Replies: 2
Views: 417

Spontaneousness

I'm confused how a reaction can be spontaneous yet still have an activation energy. I understand the difference between exergonic and endergonic but doesn't a reaction still always have to breach an energy barrier to proceed.
by DrewGomberg_1D
Thu Feb 11, 2016 12:55 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Effects of Adding Reactants and Products
Replies: 1
Views: 274

Effects of Adding Reactants and Products

I'm confused on how the addition of products and reactants effects the potential difference of a voltaic cell. How does the concentration of these reactants and products effect the cell's ability to create a flow of electrons?
by DrewGomberg_1D
Sat Feb 06, 2016 8:11 pm
Forum: Interesting Applications: Rechargeable Batteries (Cell Phones, Notebooks, Cars), Fuel Cells (Space Shuttle), Photovoltaic Cells (Solar Panels), Electrolysis, Rust
Topic: Electrodes
Replies: 1
Views: 280

Electrodes

I'm wondering the roles of an inert electrode in a galvanic cell. I don't understand how you could have the same type of cells we have been talking about in class without an electrode. I also don't understand how rechargeable batteries could function with a standard electrode.
by DrewGomberg_1D
Sun Jan 31, 2016 6:05 pm
Forum: Phase Changes & Related Calculations
Topic: Heat curve problem 1 in page 10 of workbook
Replies: 4
Views: 450

Re: Heat curve problem 1 in page 10 of workbook

I struggled with the idea of which heat capacity / phase change involved greater heat to raise in temperature per mole as well. I believe the easier way to think about it is that the higher the slope of the line is the more temperature increase you get per mole with a given amount of heat added. So ...
by DrewGomberg_1D
Fri Jan 22, 2016 1:00 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Reversible Processes
Replies: 1
Views: 293

Reversible Processes

I'm having trouble conceptually understanding the difference in between a reversible and irreversible process. It makes sense that the work done for reversible process should be the same to undo but algebraically, however, I don't really understand how this could be accomplished in an experimental s...
by DrewGomberg_1D
Thu Jan 14, 2016 6:22 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: HW Problem 8.61
Replies: 1
Views: 259

Re: HW Problem 8.61

You can calculate the total reaction enthalpy by summing up the all enthalpies of the bonds formed and subtracting them from the bonds that are created. This is because breaking bonds is endothermic (takes energy) and creating bonds is exothermic (gives off energy). For this problem we break one H-H...

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