Search found 18 matches

by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Mar 12, 2016 7:12 pm
Forum: *Alcohols
Topic: Intro to O-Chem 2.40
Replies: 1
Views: 254

Intro to O-Chem 2.40

In the Intro to O-Chem book #2.40, how come come we don't go through the complete double bond when naming? The answer starts numbering from 1 at the end of the double bond.

Thank you.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:36 am
Forum: *Alcohols
Topic: 2014 Final 5D
Replies: 1
Views: 360

2014 Final 5D

The name of the reactant is given as prop-2-en-1-ol. In this case, the alcohol is given a higher priority over the double bond. I thought the rule was that double bonds have higher priority? Is it the other way around? For the second half of the question, do functional groups always require lower nu...
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:30 am
Forum: Method of Initial Rates (To Determine n and k)
Topic: 2014 Final Exam 5A
Replies: 1
Views: 317

2014 Final Exam 5A

How was the rate constant found? Do we have to use ln[A]=kt + ln [A0]?
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:49 am
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: half reactions
Replies: 2
Views: 426

Re: half reactions

Based on previous exams, usually the unbalanced reaction formula is given and so we have to write out the half reactions, then balance them.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:41 am
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Alkenes and alkynes?
Replies: 1
Views: 332

Re: Alkenes and alkynes?

I think cis/trans only applies to alkenes because the double bonds allow for each carbon to have one substituent (which I think is the requirement for cis and trans).

If you have an alkyne, I think you can only add one subtituent. So the cis and trans doesn't apply.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Mar 12, 2016 12:24 am
Forum: General Science Questions
Topic: 3 Substituents
Replies: 3
Views: 647

Re: 3 Substituents

I think cis and trans will only be relative to two substituent problems when double bonds are given.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Tue Mar 01, 2016 12:01 am
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Identifying substituents in the molecular formula
Replies: 3
Views: 401

Re: Identifying substituents in the molecular formula

So for CH3CH=CHCH(CH3)2, their is only one substituent which is the CH3 and that is connected to the second carbon from the right, correct? Also, the textbook answer is 4-methyl-2-pentene. Does the number of the shape have higher priority over the number of the substituent? Is that why it is counted...
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Mon Feb 29, 2016 11:17 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Identifying substituents in the molecular formula
Replies: 3
Views: 401

Identifying substituents in the molecular formula

When given the molecular formula, sometimes the substituents are given in parentheses. However, sometimes that just indicates another atom in the molecule that determines the overall shape. How do you know when the atom in the parentheses is a substituent vs a carbon atom part of the main chain?
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Fri Feb 26, 2016 5:01 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkanes
Topic: Dimethyl
Replies: 2
Views: 362

Re: Dimethyl

When you have two methyls in your hydrocarbon, you should use the prefix "di" so that you won't have to use methyl twice because it seems redundant. So if the methyls are bound to the second carbon in the chain, then it would be 2,2 - dimethyl.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Feb 20, 2016 12:05 pm
Forum: *Electrophiles
Topic: Friedal-Crafts alkylation
Replies: 3
Views: 452

Re: Friedal-Crafts alkylation

Nu is a nucleophile. It grabs onto carbon to a form a new bond, but in doing so, there will be an excess amount of electrons. So to get rid of some electrons, it's easiest to break the bond between C-Cl. Cl is an electrophile so it needed electrons from Carbon, but it became full after the transfer ...
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Feb 20, 2016 11:31 am
Forum: *Nucleophilic Substitution
Topic: double/single-headed arrows
Replies: 6
Views: 1214

Re: double/single-headed arrows

I think that the half headed arrow is one of those uncommon circumstances. For the most part, the double headed arrow will be used since I believe we will be dealing with lone pairs most of the time.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Thu Feb 11, 2016 8:32 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Salt Bridge
Replies: 5
Views: 720

Re: Salt Bridge

I don't think they are mandatory. It may depend on certain reactions, but I think almost all reactions require it. Because if most reactions don't have a salt bridge, then eventually there will be a build up of of electrons in the Cathode. The electrons from the anode will continue to send electrons...
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Tue Feb 09, 2016 8:09 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Review session video does not load
Replies: 1
Views: 321

Review session video does not load

I was watching Professor Lavelle's review session video and once I get to the 7:00 mark, the videos stops and does not continue.

I've been using Internet Explorer and it has always worked fine until now.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Wed Feb 03, 2016 6:07 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Correct Formula for Standard Reduction Potential
Replies: 1
Views: 266

Correct Formula for Standard Reduction Potential

In the very first example for calculating the standard reduction Potential, it says in the course reader that E^o = Cathode - Anode. Zinc and Copper were used, giving (0.34V)-(0.76V)=1.10 Volts However, in the example after when we are balancing half reactions of Fe^3+Cu-->Cu^2+Fe^2 ...
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Jan 30, 2016 5:32 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Heat in an isothermal reaction
Replies: 2
Views: 520

Re: Heat in an isothermal reaction

Internal energy is a state function.

The usual formula for finding Internal Energy is Delta U = q + w. In an isothermal situation, change in internal energy (Delta U) is 0 since there is no change, but there can still be work/heat applied by the system. I believe that value is given from q=-w.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Sat Jan 23, 2016 12:07 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using Second Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: The Change in Entropy Equation
Replies: 1
Views: 261

Re: The Change in Entropy Equation

I believe that the rule is that when volume doubles, then degeneracy doubles because there are 2x the number of positions available.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Fri Jan 15, 2016 4:31 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Internal Energy
Replies: 1
Views: 326

Re: Internal Energy

I believe when there is constant pressure, Internal energy is equal to change in enthalpy - Pressure times change in volume. So \Delta U=\Delta H-P\Delta V And if moles are involved, then P\Delta V is important, so it won't be zero. If it is zero, then internal energy is just equal to enthalpy.
by Albert Agabekyan 1A
Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:42 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: Hess's Law
Replies: 2
Views: 486

Re: Hess's Law

I believe you can view "additive" as being another way of stating that the overall state enthalpy of chemical equations are found through summations, such as taking the enthalpy of the reactants and the enthalpy of the product in order to figure out the Standard Enthalpy Change of Formatio...

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