Search found 25 matches

by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Fri Mar 11, 2016 11:04 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkenes
Topic: Numbering
Replies: 2
Views: 454

Re: Numbering

It cannot be 1,2-dichlorocyclohexene because of the double bond. Naming it that way would actually result in an incorrect name of 1,2-dichlorohex-2-ene.
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Wed Mar 09, 2016 3:59 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Detailed Midterm Solutions
Replies: 1
Views: 222

Re: Detailed Midterm Solutions

The detailed midterm solutions are posted on the Chem14B class website
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Fri Mar 04, 2016 1:59 am
Forum: *Nucleophiles
Topic: Is CO2 a nucleophile or electrophile?
Replies: 1
Views: 5316

Re: Is CO2 a nucleophile or electrophile?

Carbon dioxide is an electrophile. If you draw out the Lewis structure for CO2, you can see that carbon is central and is bound to two oxygen atoms. The electronegativity of oxygen gives carbon a partial positive charge, making carbon dioxide an electrophile (Carbon is electron deficient).
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Feb 25, 2016 10:37 am
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 891015

Re: Chemistry Jokes

Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 10.18.19 AM.png
Titrations:)
Screen Shot 2016-02-25 at 10.18.19 AM.png (127.49 KiB) Viewed 102211 times
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:59 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Midterm distribution
Replies: 3
Views: 496

Re: Midterm distribution

When will the midterm solutions be available?
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Feb 11, 2016 6:40 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 891015

Re: Chemistry Jokes

Screen Shot 2016-02-11 at 6.35.14 PM.png
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:44 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Standard Reduction Potential as Intensive Property
Replies: 2
Views: 1136

Re: Standard Reduction Potential as Intensive Property

Also, with regard to density, it is an intensive property since it is independent of the amount/size of the material/sample. Density is mass (extensive property) divided by volume (extensive property). An extensive property divided by an extensive property is an intensive property. State properties ...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:33 pm
Forum: Work, Gibbs Free Energy, Cell (Redox) Potentials
Topic: Standard Reduction Potential as Intensive Property
Replies: 2
Views: 1136

Re: Standard Reduction Potential as Intensive Property

Standard reduction potential is an intensive property. You might multiply a half reaction by 2 to balance the electrons, but the standard reduction potential is constant and does not need to be multiplied by 2 (unlike bond enthalpies).
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Fri Jan 29, 2016 5:09 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Oxidation state
Replies: 1
Views: 253

Oxidation state

Are oxidation state and oxidation number interchangeable terms, or is there any difference between them?
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Jan 21, 2016 6:19 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Picking up the final
Replies: 1
Views: 535

Re: Picking up the final

You pick them up at 4006 Young Hall. Finals should be available this week, but I'm not sure what their hours are, sorry.
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Wed Jan 13, 2016 6:45 pm
Forum: Calculating Work of Expansion
Topic: Reversible and Irreversible
Replies: 3
Views: 473

Re: Reversible and Irreversible

I think we have to know that a reversible process is a system at equilibrium (infinitely small changes in a variable can reverse the process) and that maximum work is achieved in a reversible process.
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Jan 07, 2016 8:05 pm
Forum: Concepts & Calculations Using First Law of Thermodynamics
Topic: Equipartition theorem
Replies: 1
Views: 317

Equipartition theorem

Just out of curiosity, how high does the temperature have to be to use the equipartition theorem in calculations of vibrational motion? Thank you in advance!
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:31 am
Forum: *Making Buffers & Calculating Buffer pH (Henderson-Hasselbalch Equation)
Topic: Henderson-Hasselbach equation
Replies: 1
Views: 353

Henderson-Hasselbach equation

Are we only allowed to use the Henderson-Hasselbach equation for questions involving buffers, thereby using (R)ICE boxes for every other calculation of pH?
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Tue Nov 24, 2015 12:22 pm
Forum: Photoelectric Effect
Topic: equations for the photoelectric effect
Replies: 1
Views: 352

equations for the photoelectric effect

On Question 3b of the midterm, the question asks for the energy required to remove the electron from the metal surface. I calculated the work function (energy of the photon - kinetic energy of the electron). Why is the answer (1.66 x 10^-17 J) equivalent to only the energy of the photon if informati...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Wed Nov 18, 2015 1:24 pm
Forum: Ideal Gases
Topic: When to use atm or bar
Replies: 2
Views: 473

When to use atm or bar

When calculating Kp, does it matter whether we use atm or bar? In the Fall 2014 Quiz 3 Preparation Q8, I understand that the answer should be given in atm since that is the unit provided in the question, but for Q10, is the answer in atm because we use the ideal gas law? Also regarding Q10, why do t...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:53 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Bisoxalato vs. Dioxalato
Replies: 1
Views: 573

Re: Bisoxalato vs. Dioxalato

If the ligand is polydentate, you use the prefixes bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, pentakis, etc. Oxalate is a bidentate ligand; therefore, you use bisoxalato, not dioxalato.
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Sat Nov 14, 2015 6:48 pm
Forum: Shape, Structure, Coordination Number, Ligands
Topic: Polydentate Ligands
Replies: 1
Views: 213

Re: Polydentate Ligands

Yes, if a ligand is polydentate and there is more than one in a coordination compound, you use the prefixes bis-, tris-, tetrakis-, pentakis-, etc.
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Sun Nov 08, 2015 8:48 pm
Forum: Naming
Topic: Naming Coordination Compounds
Replies: 1
Views: 196

Re: Naming Coordination Compounds

I think you can write aqua as either H2O or OH2 when naming coordination compounds. Some people write aqua as OH2 to emphasize the order of bonding since oxygen (not hydrogen) is the one binding to other elements, but writing H2O shouldn't be wrong either.
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Fri Oct 30, 2015 9:20 am
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Lewis Sturcture of (CH3)2Be
Replies: 1
Views: 486

Re: Lewis Sturcture of (CH3)2Be

You would draw (CH3)2Be as a linear molecule. Beryllium would be your central atom, and it forms two bonds, one to each Carbon of the CH3. Each Carbon is thus bonded to Beryllium and to 3 hydrogens so it achieves octet. There are a total of 16 valence electrons ( C: 4*2=8, Be:2, H: 1*6=6.......... 8...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Fri Oct 30, 2015 8:53 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: How many significant figures does this question require?
Replies: 1
Views: 380

Re: How many significant figures does this question require?

I think you would use one significant digit because that is the least precise measurement given in the question. In general, I believe you evaluate the number of significant figures before you convert units accordingly so I would decide based on the numbers provided in the problem. The answer using ...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Sat Oct 17, 2015 12:43 pm
Forum: Electron Configurations for Multi-Electron Atoms
Topic: Aufbau Princple
Replies: 2
Views: 313

Re: Aufbau Princple

Silver is in the same group as Copper, which is an exception to the Aufbau Principle (the building-up principle), the other being Chromium. In these two cases, half full d^5 and full d^10 subshells have lower energy. For Chromium, the electron configuration would be [Ar] 3d^5 4s^1 instead of [Ar] 3d...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Sun Oct 11, 2015 12:17 am
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]
Replies: 91
Views: 8994

Re: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]

The purpose of using significant figures is to make sure that the answer you calculated isn't more precise than the number(s) you started with. If one rounds off numbers too soon, errors in calculations may occur, and significant margins of error can affect data collection. Also, the number of signi...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Thu Oct 08, 2015 12:34 pm
Forum: Student Social/Study Group
Topic: Post All Chemistry Jokes Here
Replies: 7348
Views: 891015

Re: Chemistry Jokes

What do you call Iron blowing in the wind?

Febreeze
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Wed Sep 30, 2015 10:10 pm
Forum: Significant Figures
Topic: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]
Replies: 91
Views: 8994

Re: All students read this sig fig post [ENDORSED]

If there is a multistep problem, do we maintain four significant figures per step, even for the following step? For example, if part A requires an answer with only four significant figures (example: 1.178), and part B uses that answer to solve for another variable, should we use 1.178 or the extende...
by Michelle Dela Rosa 1D
Fri Sep 25, 2015 8:34 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Homework
Replies: 5
Views: 603

Re: Homework

Doing all the reading before jumping into the practice problems does take some time, but even though there's no way to truly check if we use the textbook chapters as a resource, I think that reading the assigned chapters could only help us understand the conceptual side of the course material more f...

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