Search found 18 matches

by Nathan Cai 1J
Sat Mar 12, 2016 9:35 pm
Forum: *Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes (Staggered, Eclipsed, Gauche, Anti, Newman Projections)
Topic: Substituent Positions on Cyclohexane
Replies: 2
Views: 357

Substituent Positions on Cyclohexane

If we have 1,1-dimethylcyclohexane, do the methyls have to be pointing the same direction? For example, does they have to be equatorial up and axial up/equatorial down and axial down, or can they be equatorial up and axial down?
Thanks!
by Nathan Cai 1J
Sat Mar 12, 2016 9:28 pm
Forum: *Constitutional and Geometric Isomers (cis, Z and trans, E)
Topic: Different Isomers
Replies: 1
Views: 250

Different Isomers

What's the difference between geometric isomers, constitutional isomers , and isomeric isomers? All three terms have showed up on previous finals, and I still can't tell the difference.
Thanks!
by Nathan Cai 1J
Thu Mar 10, 2016 3:53 pm
Forum: *Cycloalkenes
Topic: Winter 2011 Final Exam Q7A
Replies: 1
Views: 304

Re: Winter 2011 Final Exam Q7A

Because the alcohol functional group has priority.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Thu Mar 03, 2016 9:20 pm
Forum: *Alkenes
Topic: Correct naming
Replies: 1
Views: 303

Re: Correct naming

both are correct
by Nathan Cai 1J
Thu Feb 25, 2016 5:15 pm
Forum: *Alkanes
Topic: Benzene shaped and molecular formula
Replies: 2
Views: 422

Re: Benzene shaped and molecular formula

Benzene is C6H6, so there will be only one H atom/carbon atom. Remember that carbons in benzene have a single bond and a double bond which leaves only one spot for hydrogen.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Tue Feb 09, 2016 5:53 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Number of electrons in the oxidation of glucose
Replies: 1
Views: 192

Number of electrons in the oxidation of glucose

Hi

For Q8 part c of MT2015, the solution says that 24e- are used in the oxidation of glucose. The 24e- involved come from 6CO2. Why don't we include the electrons from water? Because the products are 6H2O + 6CO2.

Thank you
by Nathan Cai 1J
Tue Feb 09, 2016 5:48 pm
Forum: Entropy Changes Due to Changes in Volume and Temperature
Topic: Cp vs Cv use in entropy changes due to changes in V and T
Replies: 2
Views: 309

Cp vs Cv use in entropy changes due to changes in V and T

In the 2015 MT Q4/5 part B, .15 moles of Helium gas in a balloon expands from 3.3 L to 9.2 * 10^5 L and goes from 298K to 333K. I understand to calculate dS for the change in volume we have to use nRln(v2/v1). But for the temperature, the solution says to use nCvln(T2/T1). Why do we use Cv? The volu...
by Nathan Cai 1J
Fri Feb 05, 2016 4:45 pm
Forum: Galvanic/Voltaic Cells, Calculating Standard Cell Potentials, Cell Diagrams
Topic: Calculating Standard Cell Potentials
Replies: 1
Views: 218

Re: Calculating Standard Cell Potentials

Usually you flip the one where if you add both potentials up, you get a positive number. For example if you two half reactions that E=2.15 V and E=1.25 V, you would flip the E=1.25 V.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Thu Jan 28, 2016 4:02 pm
Forum: Balancing Redox Reactions
Topic: Identifying Oxidation or Reduction first
Replies: 1
Views: 240

Re: Identifying Oxidation or Reduction first

You can choose either reaction to work with.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Sat Jan 23, 2016 12:20 pm
Forum: Gibbs Free Energy Concepts and Calculations
Topic: Gibbs Free Energy
Replies: 2
Views: 329

Re: Gibbs Free Energy

A negative gibbs free energy means that the reaction will be spontaneous.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Thu Jan 21, 2016 5:16 pm
Forum: Administrative Questions and Class Announcements
Topic: Practice Workbook
Replies: 3
Views: 597

Re: Practice Workbook

yes
by Nathan Cai 1J
Mon Jan 11, 2016 5:04 pm
Forum: Reaction Enthalpies (e.g., Using Hess’s Law, Bond Enthalpies, Standard Enthalpies of Formation)
Topic: System Vs. Surrounding
Replies: 2
Views: 693

Re: System Vs. Surrounding

The system is the reaction itself. The surrounding is EVERYTHING else.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Sun Nov 22, 2015 8:02 pm
Forum: Bronsted Acids & Bases
Topic: Bronsted and Lewis Acids and Bases
Replies: 3
Views: 588

Re: Bronsted and Lewis Acids and Bases

What makes a Lewis acid an acid is that it is an electron acceptor. On the other hand, a lewis base is an electron donator. A bronsted acid, however, is a proton donator while a bronsted base is a proton acceptor. A lewis acid can be seen as a bronsted acid.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Fri Nov 06, 2015 8:25 pm
Forum: Lewis Structures
Topic: Acetate Structure
Replies: 1
Views: 474

Re: Acetate Structure

Carbon does not have a long pair. There are two lone pairs on the double bonded oxygen and three lone pairs on the single bonded oxygen.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Fri Oct 30, 2015 10:06 pm
Forum: Ionic & Covalent Bonds
Topic: Dissociation energy
Replies: 1
Views: 262

Re: Dissociation energy

O-H will have a higher dissociation energy because it has a higher electronegativity. Thus, oxygen will hold onto the H's e- stronger than sulfur. Furthermore, oxygen has a smaller radius which means less shielding of the nucleus by electrons.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Sat Oct 17, 2015 7:56 pm
Forum: Bond Lengths & Energies
Topic: Removing electrons
Replies: 2
Views: 445

Re: Removing electrons

The difference between the second and third ionization energy will also be drastic because there will be the same amount of protons pulling on fewer electrons.
by Nathan Cai 1J
Sat Oct 10, 2015 1:10 pm
Forum: Molarity, Solutions, Dilutions
Topic: Fundamental G
Replies: 1
Views: 390

Re: Fundamental G

molarity = mol/L
since you are given the molarity and volume, plug those into the equation (don't forget to convert mL>L) and solve for moles
by Nathan Cai 1J
Sat Oct 10, 2015 1:01 pm
Forum: Einstein Equation
Topic: Value of Planck's Constant
Replies: 1
Views: 376

Re: Value of Planck's Constant

no, it was just how the book rounded. h will be 6.626x10^-34 j/s

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